Companions in Crime

The Social Aspects of Criminal Conduct

Companions in Crime

The idea of peer influence as a cause of delinquency has been around since the 1930s, when Edwin Sutherland offered his theory of differential association. Although that theory and similar ones remain popular and have strong empirical support, more recent theories reject the idea completely. This book surveys the research literature on peer influence, reveals that most offenders are imbedded in a network of friends and accomplices, and describes numerous possible mechanisms of peer influence.


 Reviews:

"Warr examines key questions concerning the relationship between peer influence and delinquent/criminal behavior. He develops in a systematic and sophisticated fashion concepts and relationships used to explain delinquency.... An excellent bibliography rounds out this valuable contribution. All levels and collections." Choice


 Prizes:

Michael J. Hindelang Award for the book that makes the most outstanding contribution to research in the field of criminology 2005 - Winner
Michael J. Hindelang Award for the book that makes the most outstanding contribution to research in the field of criminology 2005 - Winner
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