Economics in Nature

Social Dilemmas, Mate Choice and Biological Markets

Economics in Nature

Studies of sexual selection, interspecific mutualism, and intraspecific cooperation show that individuals exchange commodities to their mutual benefit. The exchange values of commodities are a source of conflict, and behavioral mechanisms such as partner choice and contest between competitors determines the composition of trading pairs or groups. These "biological markets" can be examined to gain a better understanding of the underlying principles of evolutionary ecology. In this volume scientists from different disciplines combine insights from economics, evolutionary biology, and the social sciences to look at comparative aspects of economic behavior in humans and other animals.


 Reviews:

"This book is a candid portrait of current knowledge about trad among all kinds of organisms." Michael Mesterton-Gibbons, Quarterly Review of Biology

"There are some excellent chapters and an intriguing cast of interdisciplinary contributers... this is a good book..." Monique Borgerhoff Mulder, American Journal of Human Biology

"Keddy has produced an engaging and readable text for both those interested in wetlands and ecologists who are unfamiliar with them." EcoScience

'This book deserves to be widely read, especially by those interested in cooperative behaviour, and so should increase awareness and stimulate more applications of the market approach.' International Society for Behavioural Ecology Newsletter

'The structure of the information presentation in the book is excellent. In addition, the authors and editors have been very successful in producing a writing style that combines the detail for specialists and the ease-of-reading necessary for the lay population. The information is not only scientifically thought-provoking but it can serve as a basis for advanced level discussion groups or seminars in behavioral science. In this sense one can only congratulate the authors and editors of the volume on their job well performed.' Ethology

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