Kant and the Metaphysics of Causality


Kant and the Metaphysics of Causality

Eric Watkins argues that a grasp of Leibnizian and anti-Leibnizian thought in eighteenth-century Germany helps one to see how Kant (in his critical period) argued for causal principles that have both metaphysical and epistemological elements. According to this interpretation, Kant's model of causality does not consist of events, but rather of substances endowed with causal powers that are exercised according to their natures and circumstances.


 Reviews:

"Eric Watkins' book is a substantial contribution to Kant scholarship, metaphysics, and the philosophy of science. Watkins' book makes an important difference and is among the most impressive works on Kant's early writings and their bearing on his Critiques."
Gary L. Cesarz, Southeast Missouri state University, Journal of the History of Philosophy

"Whether you agree with Watkin's reconstruction of Kantian causality or not, he defends the prospects of realistic casual analysis in a quantum world that would relegate causation to nothing less than an antiquarian curiosity." - Glenn Statile, St. John's University


 Prizes:

Cambridge University Press wishes to congratulate Eric Watkins, author of Kant and the Metaphysics of Causality, which has won the Journal of the History of Philosophy book prize.

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