The Language and Logic of the Bible

The Earlier Middle Ages

The Language and Logic of the Bible

This study looks at the assumptions within which students of the Bible in the West approached their reading, from Augustine to the end of the twelfth century, when new skills in grammar and logic made it possible to develop more refined critical methods and to apply fresh tools to the task.


 Reviews:

"The presuppositions, methods and habits of Latin writers of the eleventh and twelfth centuries learnedly examined and lucidly expounded, with a glance back to Augustine and Gregory...The interplay of philosophy and tradition with sacred text makes fascinating reading." Society for Old Testament Study Booklist

'The presuppositions, methods and habits of Latin writers of the eleventh and twelfth centuries are learnedly examined and lucidly expounded, with a glance back to Augustine and Gregory … The interplay of philosophy and tradition with sacred text makes fascinating reading.' Society for Old Testament Study Booklist

'Constant allusions to particular persons at concrete moments keep the narrative down to earth and unremote … individuals are not subsumed beneath grand general categories … The story is rather traced honestly, receptively, and flexibly from the works, practices, and life-histories of recognizable persons.' Journal of Theological Studies

No references available.