Odd Markets in Japanese History

Law and Economic Growth

Odd Markets in Japanese History

Employing a rational-choice approach, Professor Ramseyer studies the impact of Japanese law on economic growth in Japan. Toward that end, the author investigates the way law governed various markets, and the way that people negotiated contracts within those markets. Findings reveal that the legal system generally promoted mutually advantageous deals, and that people generally negotiated in ways that shrewdly promoted their private best interests. Whether in the markets for indentured servants, prostitutes, or marriage partners, this study reports little evidence of either age- or gender-related exploitation.


 Reviews:

"This is a provocative and original book, one well worth reading and thinking about." Pacific Affairs

"J. Mark Ramseyer's Odd Markets in Japanese History is a stimulating, infuriating, and truculent series of essays..." David L. Howell, Monumenta Nipponica

"This is a provocative and original book, one well worth reading and thinking about." Stephan Salzberg, Pacific Affairs

"Viola's book opens a fascinating window on the peasant world....Viola forces us to ask new and different questions about collectivization. Her book will be a starting point for all serious thought on the subject." Book Reviews

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