International Public Goods and Transfer of Technology Under a Globalized Intellectual Property Regime


International Public Goods and Transfer of Technology Under a Globalized Intellectual Property Regime

This volume considers the effects of the increasingly globalized protection of intellectual property rights on the ability of countries to provide their citizens with basic research, education, public health, and environmental protection. The contributions of distinquished economists, political scientists, and legal experts accordingly assess public processes and inputs. They reveal what an emerging transnational system of innovation needs to promote technical progress, economic growth and welfare for all participants.


 Reviews:

"This edited volume is the first major study to address comprehensively ways to minimize the social costs and enhance the beenfits of the emerging globalized intellectual property regime for the less developed countires. It is the first serious attempt to show how the expansion of intellectual property rights affects public goods. This is a ground-breaking instant classic that will be useful to social scientists, lawyeres, and legal academics interested in development."
-Michael L. Rustard, Suffolk University Law School Law and Politics Review

"Maskus and Reichman's collection provides important insights into the costs and benefits of strengthening IPRs. The evidence they provide challenges notions that increased IPRs will provide international public goods or increase ITT."
-Sarah Tireney, Stanford Journal of International Law

No references available.