The Politics of Moral Capital


The Politics of Moral Capital

John Kane argues that, despite appearances, politicians and governments care deeply about people's moral judgments, for these provide the moral capital they depend on for survival and effective functioning. Some famous leaders--Lincoln, de Gaulle, Mandela--illustrate the workings of moral capital in politics, and a study of the American presidency from Kennedy to Clinton shows how the moral capital of the United States has been eroded, with severe consequences for the nation's morale.


 Reviews:

"[John Kane's] thoughtful and well-written book. . . . stands as a refreshing effort to come to terms with the inescapably moral character of political life. It is also an important contribution to the academic study of statesmanship. It succeeds in its stated goal of helping to recover a truly capacious sense of political reality, and successfully demonstrates that moral capital is a fact with which any science of politics must come to terms if it is to do justice to the true efficacy of moral prestige and personal character in human affairs." Journal of Democracy

"[John Kane's] thoughtful and well-written book....stands as a refreshing effort to come to terms with the inescapably moral character of political life. It is also an important contribution to the academic study of statesmanship. It succeeds in its stated goal of helping to recover a truly capacious sense of political reality, and successfully demonstrates that moral capital is a fact with which any science of politics must come to terms if it is to do justice to the true efficacy of moral prestige and personal character in human affairs." Journal of Democracy

No references available.