A History of Women's Writing in Russia


A History of Women's Writing in Russia
  • Edited by Adele Marie Barker


    Edited by Jehanne M. Gheith

  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press

    Online Publication Date:September 2009

    Online ISBN:9780511485930

    Hardback ISBN:9780521572804

    Paperback ISBN:9780521576109

  • Book DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511485930

    Subjects: European literature

A History of Women's Writing in Russia traces comprehensively the lives and works of Russia's women writers from the Middle Ages to the present. Contributors have addressed the often surprising contexts within which women's writing has been produced. Chapters reveal a flourishing literary tradition where none was thought to exist, looking at how Russia's women writers articulated their own experience, and re-assesing their relationship to the dominant male tradition. The volume is supported by extensive reference features including a bibliography and guide to writers and their works.


 Reviews:

"...an excellent, much-needed and informative study...an impressive combination of intellectual rigor and stylistic brilliance." Slavic and European Journal

"...a valuable addition to the growing corpus of serious scholarship on Russian women's writing." Slavic Review

"The editors convincingly argue that by ignoring the women writers, earlier scholars have presented an incomplete, even distorted, picture of the course of Russian literature, especially in the last two centuries.... The combination of jargon-free style, nonpolemical stance, and intelligent, informed analysis renders this book necessary for everyone interested in Russian literary history and women's studies, from general readers to specialized scholars." Choice

"Well-conceived and handsomely realized, it includes contributions from almost all 'the usual suspects' and brings the collected wisdom of scholars in the field to new levels of completeness and sophistication. A History of Women's Writing in Russia is an indispensable source for anyone concerned with women's writing in Russia." The Russian Review


 Prizes:

The Heldt Book Prize Committee of American Women in Slavic Studies - Winner
Heldt Prize of the Committee of American Women in Slavic Studies
“Ol'nem, O. N.” (Tsekhovskaia, Varvara Nikolaevna; b. Men'shikova, 1872, Bobrov, Voronezh province; d. 1941). Daughter of officer from gentry; mother, daughter of priest, died 1886, while she was still studying at Kremenchug Women's Gymnasium. Became journalist in Kiev, 1889. Published first story, 1899; published regularly for only 15 years. Ed. journal Russkoe bogatstvo (later renamed Russkie zapiski), 1914—16. Last publication: 1923 biography of writer Elizaveta Vodovozova
“Staryi i novyi zavet zhenshchiny. (‘Bez zaveta O. Runovoi),” Biulleteni literatury i zhizni 7 (1913)
Gumilevskii sbornik. Harbin, 1937
Harbin and Manchuria: Place, Space, and Identity. Special issue of South Atlantic Quarterly, ed. Thomas Lahusen, 99:2 (2000)
In translation: Fever and Other New Poems, tr. Geoffrey Dutton and Igor Mezhakoff-Koriakin. New York, 1969; The Garden, tr. F. D. Reeve. New York, 1990; poems in Smith, Gerald S. (ed.), Contemporary Russian Poetry. Bloomington, IN, 1993, 124—37; Todd, Albert C. and Max Hayward (eds.) An Anthology of Twentieth Century Russian Poetry, selected by Evgenii Evtushenko. New York, 1993., 873—94; prose in Metropol’. New York, 1982; selected poems and “To My Readers,” tr. Christine Rydel in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II
In translation: Poems, The Trial, Prison, tr. Daniel Weissbort. Oxford, 1972; Red Square at Noon, tr. Alexander Lieven. Harmondsworth, 1972; Smith, Gerald S. (ed.), Contemporary Russian Poetry. Bloomington, IN, 1993, 100–11
In translation: “‘The Human Document’ and the Formation of Character,” in The Semiotics of Russian Cultural History, ed. Alexander D. Nakhimovsky and Alice Stone Nakhimovsky. Ithaca, ny, 1985; On Psychological Prose, tr. Judson Rosengrant. Princeton, nj, 1991; Blockade Diary tr. Alan Myers. London, 1995; from The Journals, tr. Jane Gary Harris in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II
In translation: “A Glimpse of Diplomacy from the Sideline,” International Affairs (Moscow); “I Stand as Witness,” Soviet Life 7 (1989); “So Shall My Life Proceed,” Soviet Literature (Moscow) 3 (1981); Kremlin Wives, tr. Cathy Porter. London, 1994
In translation: “A Vision of the War,” and “Deborah,” tr. J. D. Duff in The Soul of Russia, ed. Winifred Stephens Whale. London, 1916; “First Ball,” tr. Melissa Merrill, in Bisha et al
In translation: “Alina's Seagull,” tr. Vladimir Korotky. Soviet Literature (Moscow) 9 (1989); “In Memoriam,” tr. Catharine Nepomnyashchy, in Decter, Jacqueline (ed.), Soviet Women Writing Writing. New York, 1990. “A Bus Driver Named Astap,” and “The Phone Call,” tr. Helen Burlingame, in Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Lives in Transit. Ann Arbor, MI, 1995.; “Speak, Maria !” tr. Masha Gessen in Half a Revolution
In translation: “An Uphill Battle,” in Women and Russia, ed. Tatyana Mamonova. Boston, 1984: 93—106
In translation: “Anna Akhmatova in the Last Years of her Life,” Soviet Studies in Literature (Fall, 1977), 27—76; “Five Feuilletons,” tr. N. V. Galichenko and C. Partridge, Russian Literature Triquarterly 14 (1976), 193—223; “A Haunting Spectre,” in The Best of Ogonyok, tr. Cathy Porter. London, 1990, 203—8; “Repairing Our Car,” tr. Steven W. Nielsen in Decter, Jacqueline (ed.), Soviet Women Writing. New York, 1990., 145–52
In translation: “Bolshaya Polyanka: A Childhood in Post-War Moscow,” tr. Ivan Chulaky, Women's View, Glas 3 (1992); “Home Address” (excerpt), tr. Raisa Bobrova, Glas 6 (1993); “Springtime in Broad Daylight,” tr. Jose Alaniz, Glas 13 (1996); Dim and Distant Days, tr. Kathleen Cook and Natalie Roy, Glas: New Russian Writing, 2000
In translation: “Coldness and Rationality,” Brodsky Through the Eyes of His Contemporaries, ed. Valentina Polukhina. London, 1992, 215—36; Paradise: Selected Poems, tr. Michael Molnar. Newcastle upon Tyne, 1993; poems in Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Lives in Transit. Ann Arbor, MI, 1995., 289—93; Smith, Gerald S. (ed.), Contemporary Russian Poetry. Bloomington, IN, 1993, 246—57; Women's View; Glas 3 (1992), 163—74; Johnson, Kent and Stephen M. Ashby (eds.), Third Wave: The New Russian Poetry. Ann Arbor, MI, 1992., 211—22; Mapping Codes, 56—57; “Sale of a Historian's Library,” in Kelly Anthology; poems, tr. Sibelan Forrester in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II
In translation: “Confessional Days: In Anticipation of the End of the World,” tr. Masha Gessen in Half a Revolution: Contemporary Fiction by Russian Women
In translation: “Daytime Stars,” Soviet Literature (Moscow) 12(1961), 27—90; extract from “Daytime Stars” in Kelly Utopias; poems in Russian Poetry: The Modern Period, ed. John Glad and Daniel Weissbort. Iowa City, IA, 1978, 183—8; “In Memory of the Defenders,” in Three Centuries of Russian Poetry, ed. E. N. Bannikov. Moscow, 1980, 723; “February Diary,” in Land of the Soviets in Verse and Prose, ed. Galina Dzyubenko. Moscow, 1982, 201—3; “Conversation with a Neighbour,” Soviet Literature (Moscow) 5 (1985); prose and poetry, tr. Trina Mamoon in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II
In translation: “Equation with Two Knowns,” tr. Melissa Smith; “My Teachers,” tr. Joanne Turnbull. Glas 13 (1996); On the Road to Ourselves, in Russian Mirror: Three Plays by Russian Women, ed. and tr. Melissa T. Smith. Amsterdam, 1998
In translation: “Going After Goat-Antelopes,” tr. Elisabeth Jezierski in Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Lives in Transit. Ann Arbor, MI, 1995.; “Piggy,” tr. Andrew Bromfield in Kagal, Ayesha and Natasha Perova (eds.), Present Imperfect. Boulder, CO, 1996.; “Shamara,” tr. Andrew Bromfield, Women's View, Glas 3 (1992). Shamara and Other Stories, ed. and intro. Helena Goscilo. Evanston, IL, 2000
In translation: “Herbs from Odessa,” tr. Helena Goscilo in Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Balancing Acts. Bloomington, IN, 1989.; “Uncle Pasha,” tr. Lise Brody in “From the Soviets,” Special issue of Nimrod 33: 2 (Spring/Summer 1990); “Rush Job,” tr. Lise Brody in Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Lives in Transit. Ann Arbor, MI, 1995.; “Needlefish,” tr. Lise Brody in Aiken, Susan, Adele Barker, Maya Koreneva, and Ekaterina Stetsenko (eds.), Dialogues/Dialogi: Literary and Cultural Exchanges Between (ex-) Soviet and American Women. Durham, NC, 1994.
In translation: “In the Here and There,” tr. Masha Gessen, in Half a Revolution; In the Here and There, tr. Masha Gessen. Ann Arbor, MI 1997; Day Equals Night, tr. Seth Graham. Ann Arbor, MI, 1998
In translation: “Kozlov's Nights,” tr. Rachel Osorio in Kagal, Ayesha and Natasha Perova (eds.), Present Imperfect. Boulder, CO, 1996.
In translation: “March Second of That Year,” in Hoisington, Thomas H. (ed. and tr.), Out Visiting and Back Home. Evanston, IL, 1998.; “Lucky,” tr. Helena Goscilo, From the Soviets, Nimrod 33: 2 (special issue of spring/summer 1990) and Wild Beach; “The Chosen People,” tr. Isabel Heaman, and “Gulia,” tr. Helena Goscilo in Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Lives in Transit. Ann Arbor, MI, 1995.; “March, 1953,” tr. Arch Tait in Kagal, Ayesha and Natasha Perova (eds.), Present Imperfect. Boulder, CO, 1996. and Glas 6 (1993); “Barley Soup,” tr. Andrew Bromfield. Glas 6 (1993); Excerpt from “Sonechka,” tr. Cathy Porter. Glas 7 (1994); “Sonechka and Other Stories,” tr. Arch Tait in Glas 17 (1998); The Funeral Party, tr. Cathy Porter. New York, 2001
In translation: “Mirage,” in Pachmuss, 120—74; The Keys to Happiness, tr. Beth Holmgren and Helena Goscilo. Bloomington, 1999; from My Reminiscences: Youth. Dreams, tr. Natasha Kolchevska in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., I
In translation: “Mitigating Circumstances,” tr. Michele Berdy in Decter, Jacqueline (ed.), Soviet Women Writing Writing. New York, 1990. “The Pure Zone,” tr. Rachel Osorio and Joanne Turnbull, Glas 13 (1996); “The Clean Zone,” tr. Masha Gessen in Half a Revolution; “Where Did the Streetcar Go,” tr. Julie Barnes in Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Lives in Transit. Ann Arbor, MI, 1995.; “The Game,” tr. Ayesha Kagal and Natasha Perova in Kagal, Ayesha and Natasha Perova (eds.), Present Imperfect. Boulder, CO, 1996.
In translation: “Oh, How the Mist Came Stealing,” Soviet Literature (Moscow) 6 (1970); “On the Set,” Soviet Literature (Moscow) 3 (1975), 66—73; “That's How It Was,” Soviet Literature (Moscow) 3 (1978), 91—102; “Sidesteps,” Soviet Literature (Moscow) 6 (1986), 184—8; “Thou Shalt Not Create …” Soviet Literature (Moscow) 3 (1989), 48—65; “Between Heaven and Earth” and “The Happiest Day of My life (The Story of a Precocious Girl),” in The Image of Women in Contemporary Soviet Fiction, ed. Sigrid McLaughlin; “Between Heaven and Earth” and “Nothing Special,” tr. Helena Goscilo in Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Balancing Acts. Bloomington, IN, 1989.; “Dry Run,” tr. Michael Glenny. Granta 33 (1990); “The Happiest Day,” tr. Carol Lynn Ecale. Massachusetts Review 31 (Autumn 1990); “Hello,” Soviet Literature (Moscow) 8 (1990); “Centre of Gravity,” tr. Michael Glenny. Granta 30 (1990); “Five Figures on a Pedestal,” tr. Debra Irving in Decter, Jacqueline (ed.), Soviet Women Writing. New York, 1990.; The Talisman and Other Stories. London, 1993; “First Try,” in Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Lives in Transit. Ann Arbor, MI, 1995.; “One, Two, Three …” and “A Ruble Sixty Isn't Much,” in Soviet Literary Culture in the 1970s: The Politics of Irony, ed. A. Vishnevsky and M. Biggins. Gainesville, fl, 1993
In translation: “On Emigrè Russian Poetry, 1937,” in Russian Literature in the Baltic Between the World Wars, ed. T. Pachmuss. Columbus, 1987; poetry in Kelly Anthology; Pachmuss, Russian Literature in the Baltics, 394—422
In translation: “Parade of the Planets;” tr. Diane Nemec Ignashev in Decter, Jacqueline (ed.), Soviet Women Writing. New York, 1990.; “Lame Pigeons,” tr. Rosamund Bartlett in Dissonant Voices: The New Russian Fiction ed. Oleg Chukhontsev and Nina Sadur. New York, 1991; “Venetian Mirrors,” tr. Valentina Baslyk in Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Lives in Transit. Ann Arbor, MI, 1995.
In translation: “Peters,” tr. Mary Zirin in Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Balancing Acts. Bloomington, IN, 1989.; “Night,” tr. Mary Zirin in Glasnost: An Anthology of Literature under Gorbachev. Ann Arbor, mi, 1990; On the Golden Porch, tr. Antonia Bouis. New York, 1989; “Sleepwalker in a Fog,” tr. Jamey Gambrell in Decter, Jacqueline (ed.), Soviet Women Writing Writing. New York, 1990.; Sleepwalker in a Fog, tr. Jamey Gambrell. New York, 1990; for full cites see Ledkovsky, Marina, Charlotte Rosenthal, and Mary Zirin (eds.), Dictionary of RussianWomenWriters. Westport, CT, 1994. and Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II
In translation: “Pulkovo Meridian,” in Russian Literature since the Revolution, ed. Joshua Kunitz. New York, 1948 and in Land of the Soviets in Verse and Prose, ed. G. Dzyubenko. Moscow, 1982; “Nor-Bibi's Crime” and “Spring Cleaning,” in Loaf of Sugar and Other Stories, ed. Yvonne Kapp. London, 1957; Leningrad Diary, tr. Serge M. Wolff and Rachael Grieve. New York, 1971; “Garlic in His Suitcase,” tr. M. Schwartz, Literary Review 34 (Winter 1991), 259—66; from A Place in the Sun, tr. Mary Nichols in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II
In translation: “Rank and Money,” tr. Helena Goscilo in Russian and Polish Women's Fiction, ed. Helena Goscilo. Knoxville, TN, 1985; Slavic and East European Journal 30:2 (1986); Perkins, Pamela and Albert Cook (eds.), The Cook Burden of Sufferance:Women Poets of Russia. New York, 1993.; Kelly Anthology; poems and the play Chatsky's Return to Moscow excerpted in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999. I
In translation: “Recapitulation,” tr. Alex Miller, Soviet Literature (Moscow) 6 (1987); “That Strange Man Altukhov,” tr. June Goss and Elena Goreva, Soviet Literature (Moscow) 3 (1989); “The Double-Barreled Name,” tr. Marian Schwartz, From the Soviets, Special issue of Nimrod 33: 2 (Spring/Summer 1990); “The Blackthorn,” tr. Nicholas Short, Soviet Literature (Moscow), 1988; “The Blackthorn,” tr. Brittain Smith in Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Lives in Transit. Ann Arbor, MI, 1995.; “On Upper Maslovka,” tr. Marian Schwartz, Glas 13 (1996)
In translation: “She Who Bears No Ill,” tr. Masha Gessen in Half a Revolution
In translation: “Song” and twenty-one more poems, in Markov, Vladimir and Merrill Sparks (eds.), Modern Russian Poetry: An Anthology with Verse Translations. Indianapolis, IN, 1967, 56—89; “Heavenly Words” and twelve stories in Selected Works of Zinaida Hippius, ed. and tr. Temira Pachmuss, Urbana, 1972; Between Paris and St. Petersburg: Selected Diaries of Zinaida Hippius, tr. Temira Pachmuss. Munich, 1972; “Choosing a Sack,” in Kelly Utopias; poems, tr. Christine Borowec in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II. For more complete listing, see Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II and Ledkovsky, Marina, Charlotte Rosenthal, and Mary Zirin (eds.), Dictionary of RussianWomenWriters. Westport, CT, 1994.
In translation: “Special Troikas: A Corps,” Conjunctions 23 (1994), 145—49; Women's View, Glas 3 (1992), 151—61; Johnson, Kent and Stephen M. Ashby (eds.), Third Wave: The New Russian Poetry. Ann Arbor, MI, 1992., 89—100; Mapping Codes, Five Fingers Review 8—9. San Francisco, CA, 1990, 32—6, 174—85; Todd, Albert C. and Max Hayward (eds.) An Anthology of Twentieth Century Russian Poetry, selected by Evgenii Evtushenko. New York, 1993., 1019–22
In translation: “The Alarm in the Cupboard” (A Week Like Any Other), tr. Beatrice Stillman, Redbook, March, 1971; “The Retirement Party,” tr. Anatole Forostenko, Russian Literature Triquarterly 9 (1974); The Barsukov Triangle, the Two-Toned Blonde and Other Stories, ed. Proffer and Proffer; A Week Like Any Other: Novellas and Stories, tr. Pieta Monks. Seattle, WA, 1989; Just Another Week, ed. Lora Paperno, Natalie Roklina, and Richard Leed. Columbus, oh, 1989; “The Kiss,” tr. Wanda Sorgente in Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Balancing Acts. Bloomington, IN, 1989.; “Laine's House,” tr. Gerald Mikkelson and Margaret Winchell, in Decter, Jacqueline (ed.), Soviet Women Writing Writing. New York, 1990. excerpt from Day of Remembrance, tr. Maureen Riley in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II, 1284—97
In translation: “The Bloody Women's Ward,” tr. Arch Tait, Women's View, Glas 3 (1992); “The Losers’ Division,” tr. Jehanne Gheith in Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Lives in Transit. Ann Arbor, MI, 1995.; “The Day of the Poplar Flakes,” tr. Masha Gessen in Half a Revolution; “Rendezvous,” tr. Helena Goscilo in Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Lives in Transit. Ann Arbor, MI, 1995.. “Cabiria of the Obvodny Canal,” tr. Brian Thomas Oles (ms)
In translation: “The Customer” in Tellers of Tales: One Hundred Short Stories, ed. W. Somerset Maugham. New York, 1939
In translation: “The Dog”, tr. E. Haber, Russian Literature Triquarterly 9 (1974); “Time,” tr. E. Haber, in The Bitter Air of Exile. Berkeley, 1977; stories in Pachmuss, Temira (ed. and tr.),Women Writers in Russian Modernism. Urbana, IL, 1978 and A Russian Cultural Revival; All About Love, tr. D. Goldstein. Ann Arbor, 1985; one-act play, story in Kelly Anthology; “A Small Town on the Seine,” “Huron” in Kelly Utopias; “The Pipe,” in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II; poem in Todd, Albert C. and Max Hayward (eds.) An Anthology of Twentieth Century Russian Poetry, selected by Evgenii Evtushenko. New York, 1993.
In translation: “The Grandmother of Russian Poetry: A Self Portrait,” in Kelly Anthology; poems in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II
In translation: “The Ladies’ Hairdresser,” tr. L. Gregg, Russian Literature Triquarterly 5 (1973), 223—65; repr. Ardis Anthology of Recent Russian Literature. Ann Arbor, mi, 1975, 223—64; ibid., tr. Brian Thomas Oles in Aiken, Susan, Adele Barker, Maya Koreneva, and Ekaterina Stetsenko (eds.), Dialogues/Dialogi: Literary and Cultural Exchanges Between (ex-) Soviet and American Women. Durham, NC, 1994., 44—87; “One Summer in the City,” tr. Lauren Leighton, Russian Literature Triquarterly 11 (1975), 146—67; ibid., tr. Sigrid McLaughlin in The Image of Women in Contemporary Soviet Fiction, 18—48; “The Faculty,” tr. Melinda MacLean, Soviet Literature (Moscow) 9 (1979), 3—107; 10 (1979), 16—128; “The Hotel Manager,” tr. Michel Petrov, in Russian Women: Two Stories. New York, 1983, 65—304; The Ship of Widows, tr. and intro. Cathy Porter. London, 1985; “Real Life in Real Terms,” Moscow News 24 (1987), 11; “Masters of Their Own Lives,” tr. Dobrochna Dyrcz-Freeman, in Decter, Jacqueline (ed.), Soviet Women Writing. New York, 1990., 85—105; “Under the Street Lamp,” tr. Dobrochna Dyrcz-Freeman, in Russia According to Women: Literary Anthology, comp. and preface Marina Ledkovsky. Tenafly, NJ, 1991 45—66; “Rothschild's Violin”, tr. Maureen Riley in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II, 1338–48
In translation: “The Old Woman,” in Azure Cities. Stories of New Russia, ed. Joshua Kunitz. New York, 1929; “The Lawbreakers,” in Soviet Literature, ed. George Reavey and Marc L. Slonim. New York, 1934; excerpt from The Lawbreakers, tr. Lisa Taylor in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II
In translation: “The Profited Land,” in Hoisington, Thomas H. (ed. and tr.), Out Visiting and Back Home. Evanston, IL, 1998.; “The Barsukov Triangle,” tr. David Lapeza in The Barsukov Triangle, the Two-Toned Blond and Other Stories; “Between Spring and Summer” and “The Farewell Light,” tr. Helena Goscilo and Valeria Sajez in Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Balancing Acts. Bloomington, IN, 1989.; “The Monster,” tr. Bernard Meares in Decter, Jacqueline (ed.), Soviet Women Writing. New York, 1990.; “Victory,” in Soviet Literary Culture in the 1970s, ed. and tr. Anatoly Vishnevsky and Michael Biggins. Gainesville, fl, 1993; “Slowly the Old Woman …,” tr. John Beebe in Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Lives in Transit. Ann Arbor, MI, 1995.
In translation: “The Settlement,” in Kelly Anthology
In translation: “The Stone Mason,” Soviet Literature 1 (1981); “Rush Hour,” tr. Valentina Jacque, Soviet Literature 3 (1984); “Home,” tr. Marina Astman in Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Balancing Acts. Bloomington, IN, 1989.; “Vera Perova,” tr. Rebecca Epstein in Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Lives in Transit. Ann Arbor, MI, 1995.
In translation: “The Sulphur Spring,” in Andrew, Joe (ed. and tr.), Russian Women's Shorter Fiction: An Anthology, 1835–60. Oxford, 1996.; The Cavalry Maiden: Journals of a Russian Officer in the Napoleonic Wars, ed., intro., and tr. Mary Fleming Zirin. Bloomington, 1988; “From Notes of Aleksandrov: Supplement to A Cavalry Maiden,” tr. Christine D. Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999. in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., I
In translation: “The Wall,” tr. Helena Goscilo, in Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Balancing Acts. Bloomington, IN, 1989.; “Uncle Khlor and Koriakin,” tr. Mary Zirin, in Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Lives in Transit. Ann Arbor, MI, 1995.; “The Three ‘Loves’ of Masha Peredreeva,” tr. Rachel Osorio, Women's View, Glas 3 (1992) and in Kagal, Ayesha and Natasha Perova (eds.), Present Imperfect. Boulder, CO, 1996.
In translation: “Three Looms,” in Azure Cities, ed. J. Kunitz. New York, 1929; Creative Freedom and the Soviet Artist. London, 1953; Journey through Soviet Armenia. Moscow, 1954; Retracing Lenin's Steps. Moscow, 1974; “Seeing in the Twentieth Century,” in Always a Woman. Moscow, 1987; “Man and Time,” Soviet Literature (Moscow) 9 (1989); Mass Mend: Yankees in Petrograd. Ann Arbor, 1991; “The Corinthian Canal,” in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II
In translation: “Through Hard Times,” tr. Joseph Kiegel in Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Balancing Acts. Bloomington, IN, 1989.
In translation: “Touched: Little Stories,” tr. Masha Gessen in Half a Revolution; “Wicked Girls,” tr. Wendy Fornoff in Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Lives in Transit. Ann Arbor, MI, 1995.; “Worm-eaten Sonny,” tr. Wendy Fornoff in Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Lives in Transit. Ann Arbor, MI, 1995.; “Witch's Tears,” tr. Alexander Maidan in Kagal, Ayesha and Natasha Perova (eds.), Present Imperfect. Boulder, CO, 1996.; excerpts from “Witch's Tears,” tr. Alexander Maidan, Women's View, Glas 3 (1992); “Irons and Diamonds,” tr. Andrew Bromfield, Glas 6 (1993); Frozen (one-act play) in Kelly Anthology; Witch's Tears and Other Stories, tr. Cathy Porter. London, 1997
In translation: “Waiting for the Golden Age,” tr. Bob Greenall, Women's View, Glas 3 (1992)
In translation: A Conversation after Dinner, in Andrew, Joe (ed. and tr.), Russian Women's Shorter Fiction: An Anthology, 1835–60. Oxford, 1996.; An After-Dinner Visit, tr. Andrea Lanoux in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., I
In translation: A Double Life, tr. Barbara Heldt Monter. Ann Arbor, mi, 1978; 3rd, revised edn, Oakland, ca, 1996; poems in The Penguin Book of Russian Verse, ed. Dimitri Obolensky, 1962; repr. London, 1969; Perkins, Pamela and Albert Cook (eds.), The Cook Burden of Sufferance:Women Poets of Russia. New York, 1993.; The Portable Nineteenth-Century Russian Reader, ed. George Gibian. New York, 1993; Kelly Anthology; Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., I
In translation: Antonina, tr. Michael Katz. Evanston, 1996; excerpts from Crimean Letters, tr. Jehanne Gheith in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., I; “Reminiscences and Ruminations,” tr. Sibelan Forrester, http://ash.swarthmore.edu/Slavic/turr&r.html
In translation: Autobiography of a Sexually Emancipated Woman, tr. S. Attanasio, ed. E. Fetscher, preface by Germaine Greer. New York, 1971; The Love of Worker Bees, tr. Cathy Porter. London, 1977; Selected Writings of Alexandra Kollontai, ed. and tr. Alix Holt. Bristol and New York, 1977; A Great Love, tr. Cathy Porter. London, 1981; Alexandra Kollontai: Selected Articles and Speeches, ed. Cynthia Carlile. New York, 1984; “Thirty-Two Pages,” tr. Rimma Volynska in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II
In translation: Diary of a Schoolteacher, tr. Rose Prokofieva. Moscow, 1954; “Empty Eyes and Magic Eyes,” in Pages from Tarusa. Boston, 1964, 301—9; “The Trial of Iosif Brodsky,” New Leader (August 31, 1964), 6—17, and Encounter (September, 1964), 84—91; “A Question of Ethics,” tr. F. F. Snyder, Russian Literature Triquarterly 5 (1973), 406—13; “Five Lives and the Committee,” tr. Teresy Polowy in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II, 1093–1101
In translation: Four by Petrushevskaya, tr. Alma Law. Scarsdale, NY, 1984; Clarissa and Other Stories, tr. Alma Law. Scarsdale, NY, 1985; “Our Crowd,” tr. Helena Goscilo, Michigan Quarterly Review (Fall, 1998); “Nets and Traps,” tr. Sigrid McLaughlin, in The Image of Women in Contemporary Soviet Fiction, ed. McLaughlin. New York, 1989; Three Girls in Blue in Stars in the Morning Sky: Five Plays from the Soviet Union, tr. Michael Glenny. London, 1989; “Mania,” tr. Helena Goscilo in Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Balancing Acts. Bloomington, IN, 1989.; “The Violin,” tr. Marina Ledkovsky in Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Balancing Acts. Bloomington, IN, 1989.; “Our Crowd,” in Glasnost: An Anthology of Literature under Gorbachev. Ann Arbor, MI, 1990; “The Overlook,” tr. Dobrochna Dyrcz-Freeman in Decter, Jacqueline (ed.), Soviet Women Writing. New York, 1990.; “The New Family Robinson,” tr. G. Bird in Dissonant Voices: The New Russian Fiction, ed. Oleg Chukhontsev. London, 1991; Cinzano: Eleven Plays, tr. Stephen Mulrine. London, 1991. The Time: Night, tr. Sally Laird. London, 1994; Immortal Love, tr. Sally Laird. London; “That Kind of Girl,” tr. Lise Brody in Aiken, Susan, Adele Barker, Maya Koreneva, and Ekaterina Stetsenko (eds.), Dialogues/Dialogi: Literary and Cultural Exchanges Between (ex-) Soviet and American Women. Durham, NC, 1994., 1995. “Fairy Tales for Grownup Children,” tr. Jane Taubman in Glas 13 (1996). For more complete listing, see Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II and Ledkovsky, Marina, Charlotte Rosenthal, and Mary Zirin (eds.), Dictionary of RussianWomenWriters. Westport, CT, 1994.
In translation: Hope against Hope, tr. Max Hayward. New York, 1970; Mozart and Salieri, tr. Robert A. McLean. Ann Arbor, mi, 1973; Hope Abandoned, tr. Max Hayward. New York, 1974
In translation: It Actually Happened. A Book of Facts. Moscow, 1942; The Mother and the Stern Master: Selected Poems. Nottingham, 1998; “No Dream,” in Kelly Anthology; poems in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II
In translation: Ivan Ivanovich, tr. Margaret Wettlin. Moscow, 1952
In translation: Journey into the Whirlwind, tr. Max Hayward and Paul Stevenson. New York, 1967, 1989; Within the Whirlwind, tr. Ian Boland. New York, 1981, 1988
In translation: Les mains vides, intro. A. Kuprin. Paris, 1931; Les ailes blanches, tr. M. E. and W. Vogt. Paris, 1932
In translation: Love's Anvil: A Romance of Northern Russia, tr. Douglas Ashby. London, 1921; “After the Great Hunger” (extract from “Round the Villages: A Doctor's Memoir of an Epidemic,” 1896), in Kelly Anthology; from Notes of a Rural Doctor, tr. Mildred Davies in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II
In translation: Memoirs of the Empress Catherine II, Written by Herself with a Preface by Aleksandr Herzen. New York and London, 1859; also as Memoirs of Catherine the Great, tr. Katharine Anthony. New York, 1927; Voltaire and Catherine the Great: Selected Correspondence, tr. A. Lentin. Cambridge, 1974; Selections from Odds and Ends, tr. Marcus C. Levitt in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., I. For complete listing, see Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., I
In translation: No, I'm Not Afraid. Newcastle upon Tyne, 1986; A Tale of Three Heads, tr. Diane Nemec Ignashev. Tenafly, nj, 1986; Beyond the Limit, tr. Frances Padorr Brent and Carol J. Avins. Evanston, 1987; Pencil Letter. Newcastle upon Tyne, 1988; Gray is the Color of Hope, tr. Alyona Kojevnikov. New York, 1988; In the Beginning, tr. Alyona Kojevnikov. New York, 1991; Dance with a Shadow, tr. David McDuff. Newcastle upon Tyne, 1992; Wind of the Journey: Poems. Chicago, 2000
In translation: On the Way: A Sketch, in Andrew, Joe (ed. and tr.), Russian Women's Shorter Fiction: An Anthology, 1835–60. Oxford, 1996.; After the Flood; tr. Karla Thomas Solomon in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., I; The Boarding-School Girl, tr. Karen Rosneck. Evanston, IL, 2000
In translation: Out of Childhood, tr. D. Nachshen. New York, 1930; All Hope Abandon, tr. F. Reed. New York, 1949; poetry in “Days With Bunin,” tr. K. Gavrilovich, Russian Review (1971); Markov, Vladimir and Merrill Sparks (eds.), Modern Russian Poetry: An Anthology with Verse Translations. Indianapolis, IN, 1967; Pachmuss, A Russian Cultural Revival; and Todd, Albert C. and Max Hayward (eds.) An Anthology of Twentieth Century Russian Poetry, selected by Evgenii Evtushenko. New York, 1993.
In translation: Poems of Akhmatova, tr. S. Kunitz and M. Hayward. Boston, 1967; Tale Without a Hero and Twenty-Two Poems by Anna Akhmatova, tr. J. van der Eng-Liedmeier and K. Verheul. The Hague, 1973; Selected Poems, tr. Richard McKane. Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 1989; The Complete Poems of Anna Akhmatova, updated and expanded edn. tr. Judith Hemschemeyer, ed. Roberta Reeder. Edinburgh and Boston, 1992; “The Willow,” tr. Alan Myers in Kelly Utopias
In translation: Reminiscences of Institute Life, tr. Valentina Baslyk, in Clyman, Toby W. and Judith Vowles (eds.), Russia Vowles through Women's Eyes: Autobiographies from Tsarist Russia New Haven, CT and London, 1996.
In translation: Russian Boy. Fragment of an Autobiography from 1916—1924. London, 1942; “The Thief,” in Soviet Stories of the Last Decade, tr. Elizaveta Fen. London, 1945
In translation: Russian Literature Triquarterly 9 (1974); Perkins, Pamela and Albert Cook (eds.), The Cook Burden of Sufferance:Women Poets of Russia. New York, 1993.; poems in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., I
In translation: Sasha, tr. Pamela Chester in Bisha, Robin, Jehanne Gheith, Christine Holden, William Wagner (eds.), Russian Women, 1698–1917: Experience and Expression: An Anthology of Sources. Bloomington, IN, 2002. The Plaything, tr. Jane Costlow (unpubd.); Karmelyuk, tr. Oles Kovalenko (orig., 1863, tr. Dnipro, 1981); Ukrainian Folk Stories, tr. N. Pepan-Popil. Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, 1983; Katerina, tr. Lisa Taylor in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., I
In translation: Selected Poems, tr. E. Feinstein. Oxford, 1971, 1986 and New York, 1987, 1994; A Captive Spirit (essays), tr. J. M. King. Preface by Susan Sontag, London, 1983 and Ann Arbor, 1980, 1994; The Demesne of Swans, tr. R. Kemball. Ann Arbor, 1980; Letters, Summer 1926, tr. M. Wettlin and W. Arndt. San Diego, 1985; Selected Poems, tr. D. McDuff. Newcastle, 1987, 1991; Art in the Light of Conscience (essays), tr. A. Livingstone. Cambridge, MA, 1992; After Russia, tr. M. Naydan and S. Yastremski, ed. M. Naydan. Ann Arbor, 1992; “Staircase,” in Kelly Anthology; “Letter to the Amazon,” in Artes 3 (1996); poems and letters, tr. Jane Taubman and Sibelan Forrester in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II. Poem of the End. Selected Narrative and Lyrical Poetry, tr. Nina Kossman, Dana Point, CA. 1998; The Ratcatcher, tr. Angela Livingstone. London, 1999; “In Praise of the Rich,” tr. Mimi Khalvati in Kelly Utopias; The Letters of Marina Tsvetaeva (forthcoming); For complete listing, see Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II
In translation: Self-Sacrifice; from Evenings by the Karpovka: Baron Reichman, The Locket, in Andrew, Joe (ed. and tr.), Russian Women's Shorter Fiction: An Anthology, 1835–60. Oxford, 1996.; from My Acquaintances from Kursk, tr. Rebecca Bowman, in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., I
In translation: Soviet Poets and Poetry, ed. A. Kaun. Berkeley, 1943; The Little Camels of the Sky, tr. K. O'Brien Ann Arbor, mi, 1983; from her diary and from Hurdy-Gurdy, tr. Juliette Stapanian-Apkarian in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., I
In translation: The Deserted House, tr. Aline Worth. New York, 1967; Going Under, tr. Peter Weston. New York, 1972; Sofia Petrovna, tr. Aline Worth, revised edn, Eliza Kellogg Klose. Evanston, IL, 1988; To the Memory of Childhood, tr. Eliza Kellogg Klose. Evanston, IL, 1988; The Akhmatova Journals, vol. I, 1938—1941, tr. Milena Michalski, Sylva Rubashova, and Peter Norman. New York, 1994; excerpt from “The Process of Expulsion,” tr. Christine D. Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999. in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II, 1133—40
In translation: The Head of the Medusa, tr. Carol Ueland in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., I; The Tragic Menagerie, tr. Jane Costlow. Evanston, IL, 1999; “The Whip,” in Kelly Utopias
In translation: The Ideal, Society's Judgement in Andrew, Joe (ed. and tr.), Russian Women's Shorter Fiction: An Anthology, 1835–60. Oxford, 1996.; “From The Reminiscences of Zheleznovodsk,” tr. Veronica Shapovalov in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., I; excerpt from Sud sveta in Bisha, Robin, Jehanne Gheith, Christine Holden, William Wagner (eds.), Russian Women, 1698–1917: Experience and Expression: An Anthology of Sources. Bloomington, IN, 2002.
In translation: The Italics are Mine, tr. P. Radley. New York, 1969; The Accompanist, tr. M. Schwartz. London, 1987; The Revolt, tr. M. Schwartz. London, 1989; The Tattered Cloak, tr. M. Schwartz. London, 1991, and Three Novels, 2 vols. London, 1990—1; Alexander Blok: A Life, tr. Robyn Marsack. New York, 1996; The Book of Happiness, tr. M. Schwartz. New York, 1999. For complete listing, see Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II
In translation: The Memoirs of Princess Dashkova, ed. and tr. Kyril Fitzlyon. London, 1958; repr. Durham, 1995; selected prose and poetry, tr. Alexander Woronzoff-Dashkoff in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., I
In translation: The Privilege Was Mine. London, 1958; New York, 1959; London, New York, 1964; The Fall of Eagles: Precursors of Peter the Great. New York, 1964
In translation: The Road to Nirvana. Moscow, 1971; “Stage Actress,” tr. Helena Goscilo in Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Balancing Acts. Bloomington, IN, 1989.
In translation: The Train, tr. E. Manning and M. Budberg. London, 1948; The Factory, tr. Moura Budberg. London, 1949; Bright Shore, tr. B. Isaacs, Soviet Literature (Moscow) 3 (1959), 3—142; Looking Ahead (Kruzhilikha), tr. David Skvirsky. Moscow, 1955; Span of the Year, tr. Vera Traill. London, 1957; Serezha and Valya. New York, 1964; Selected Works, tr. Olga Shartse and Eve Manning. Moscow, 1976; from Bright Shore, tr. Ruth Kreuzer in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II. For complete listing see Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II
In translation: The Traktor-Kolkhoz, Moscow, 1950; Harvest. Moscow, 1952; New York, 1953; The New Comer. The Manager of an MTS and the Chief Agronomist, tr. David Skvirsky. Moscow, 1955
In translation: The Village Priest and Other Stories from the Russian of Militsyna and Saltykov, tr. Beatrix L. Tollemache. London, 1918
In translation: The White Charger, tr. Gerrie Thielens. New York, 1946; A Fine of 200 Francs. New York, 1947, 1986; The Inspector of Ruins, tr. Norman Cameron. London, 1952; New York, 1953
In translation: The Wrath of Dionysus: A Novel by Evdokia Nagrodskaia, tr. and ed. Louise McReynolds. Bloomington, IN, 1997
In translation: The Young Lady of the Steppes, in Andrew, Joe (ed. and tr.), Russian Women's Shorter Fiction: An Anthology, 1835–60. Oxford, 1996.; from Memoirs, tr. Ruth Sobel in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., I
In translation: Three Russian Poets, tr. Elaine Feinstein. Manchester, 1979; Smith, Gerald S. (ed.), Contemporary Russian Poetry. Bloomington, IN, 1993, 138—55; Todd, Albert C. and Max Hayward (eds.) An Anthology of Twentieth Century Russian Poetry, selected by Evgenii Evtushenko. New York, 1993., 932—9; poems, tr. Jonathan Chaves in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II
In translation: excerpt, Grasse Diary, in The Bitter Air of Exile, ed. Simon Karlinsky. Berkeley, ca, 1977
In translation: from About That Which Never Was and poems, tr. Kathleen Dillon in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., I
In translation: Kelly Anthology
In translation: poem in Kelly Anthology
In translation: poem in Todd, Albert C. and Max Hayward (eds.) An Anthology of Twentieth Century Russian Poetry, selected by Evgenii Evtushenko. New York, 1993.
In translation: poem in Todd, Albert C. and Max Hayward (eds.) An Anthology of Twentieth Century Russian Poetry, selected by Evgenii Evtushenko. New York, 1993.
In translation: Poems in Johnson, Kent and Stephen M. Ashby (eds.), Third Wave: The New Russian Poetry. Ann Arbor, MI, 1992., 129—36; “A Rare Independence,” Brodsky Through the Eyes of His Contemporaries, ed. V Polukhina. Basingstoke, 1992, 237—59; Smith, Gerald S. (ed.), Contemporary Russian Poetry. Bloomington, IN, 1993, 268—79; Glas 4 (1993), 221—7; “Fifth Stanzas,” in Kelly Anthology; The Silk of Time, ed. Valentina Polukhina. Keele, 1994; The Wild Rose, tr. Richard McKane. London, 1996; poems, tr. Catriona Kelly in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II; essay: “The Vacancy for a Poet,” in Rereading Russian Poetry, ed. Stephanie Sandler, New Haven, CT, 1999, 71—7
In translation: poems in Russian Literature Triquarterly 5 (1972); poems in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II
In translation: poems in Russian Literature Triquarterly 9 (1974); Perkins, Pamela and Albert Cook (eds.), The Cook Burden of Sufferance:Women Poets of Russia. New York, 1993.; Kelly Anthology; tr. Bonnie Marshall in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., I
In translation: poems in Soviet Literature (Moscow) 3 (1989), 134; Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Lives in Transit. Ann Arbor, MI, 1995., 306–8
In translation: poems in Soviet Literature (Moscow) 6 (1967), 5 (1985), and in Land of the Soviets in Verse and Prose, I, ed. Galina Dzyubenko. Moscow, 1982
In translation: poems in The Heritage of Russian Verse, ed. Dmitri Obolensky. Bloomington, 1976; Three Russian Poets: Margarita Aliger, Yunna Moritz, Bella Akhmadulina, ed. Ellen Feinstein. Manchester, 1979; Song of a Nightingale: An Anthology of Modern Soviet Short Stories. Delhi, 1987; poems, tr. Lisa Taylor in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II
In translation: poems in Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Lives in Transit. Ann Arbor, MI, 1995., 294—8; Glas 1 (1991), 237—46; Johnson, Kent and Stephen M. Ashby (eds.), Third Wave: The New Russian Poetry. Ann Arbor, MI, 1992., 13–22
In translation: poems in Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Lives in Transit. Ann Arbor, MI, 1995., 299–300
In translation: poems in Kelly Anthology
In translation: poems in Markov, Vladimir and Merrill Sparks (eds.), Modern Russian Poetry: An Anthology with Verse Translations. Indianapolis, IN, 1967.; Pachmuss, A Russian Cultural Revival
In translation: Poems in Markov, Vladimir and Merrill Sparks (eds.), Modern Russian Poetry: An Anthology with Verse Translations. Indianapolis, IN, 1967; Conditions, 6 (1980); Perkins, Pamela and Albert Cook (eds.), The Cook Burden of Sufferance:Women Poets of Russia. New York, 1993.; Kelly Anthology and Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., I. From ‘Noted names’ in Kelly Utopias
In translation: poems in Markov, Vladimir and Merrill Sparks (eds.), Modern Russian Poetry: An Anthology with Verse Translations. Indianapolis, IN, 1967; Pachmuss A Russian Cultural Revival; Todd, Albert C. and Max Hayward (eds.) An Anthology of Twentieth Century Russian Poetry, selected by Evgenii Evtushenko. New York, 1993.; poetry and story in Kelly Anthology; poem tr. C. Kelly, New Poetry Quarterly 2 (1995)
In translation: poems in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II
In translation: poems in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II
In translation: poems, tr. Barry P. Scherr in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., I; “The Red Cloak” (and nine other poems), tr. T. Pachmuss, in Pachmuss, Temira (ed. and tr.),Women Writers in Russian Modernism. Urbana, IL, 1978., 250–60
In translation: poems, tr. Christine D. Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999. in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., I
In translation: poems, tr. Diana Burgin, intro. S. Poliakova, Boulevard 4:3 and 5:1 (1990)
In translation: poems, tr. Gerald Janacek in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II
In translation: poems, tr. H. William Tjalsma in Metropol’. Literary Almanac. New York, 1982; poems, tr. Walter Arndt in Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Lives in Transit. Ann Arbor, MI, 1995., 309—12; Todd, Albert C. and Max Hayward (eds.) An Anthology of Twentieth Century Russian Poetry, selected by Evgenii Evtushenko. New York, 1993., 897—8; poems, tr. Ronald Meyer in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II
In translation: poems, tr. Nancy Lynn Cooper in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., I
In translation: six poems, tr. Catriona Kelly, in Russian Women's Camp Memoirs, ed. J. Crowfoot and S. Vilensky. London, 1995; poems, tr. Catriona Kelly in Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II
In translation: stories in Pachmuss, A Russian Cultural Revival and Russian Literature in the Baltic Between the World Wars
In translation: Todd, Albert C. and Max Hayward (eds.) An Anthology of Twentieth Century Russian Poetry, selected by Evgenii Evtushenko. New York, 1993., 1048–9
Interviews: “‘Ia iz liudei, i bol'no mne liudskoe …’: Shest’ fragmentov odnoi besedy,” Literaturnaia gazeta (Literary Gazette) 10:5284 (March 7, 1990), 13; Brodsky's Poetics and Aesthetics, ed. L. Loseff and V. Polukhina. New York, 1990, 194—204
Interviews: V. Polukhina (ed.), Brodsky Through the Eyes of His Contemporaries. New York, 1992, 94—9
Mapping Codes / Five Fingers Review 8—9. San Francisco, CA, 1990
Ostrov. Shanghai, 1946
Recent editions: Alykh Bashen’ korolevstvo. Moscow, 2000
Recent editions: Dolg, in Iakushin,N.I. (ed.), “Serdtsa chutkogo prozren'em”… Povesti i rasskazy russkikh pisatel'nits XIXV. Moscow 1991.
Recent editions: Pis'ma 1926 goda. Moscow, 1990; Stikhotvoreniia i poemy. Moscow, 1990; Sobranie sochinenii (Collected works), 7 vols. Moscow, 1994—5. Neizdannoe. Svodnye Tetradi. Moscow, 1997
Recent editions: “Dom sumasshedshikh v Moskve v 1858g,” in Epigramma i satira: iz istorii literaturnoi boby XIX veka. Moscow and Leningrad, 1931—21; repr. Oxford, 1975, Stikhotvoreniia. Proza. Pisma, ed. Boris Romanov. Moscow, 1986; Talisman: Izbrannoe (Selections)rannye liriki. Moscow, 1987. Schastlivaia zhenshchina: Literaturnye sochineniia (1991); “Poedinok,” in Russkaia romanticheskaia povest’. Moscow, 1992; Palazzo Forli (1993)
Recent editions: “Malen'kaia devochka: P'esa,” Sovremennaia dramaturgiia 2 (1991); Zheleznaia zhenshchina. Moscow, 1991; Rasskazy v izgnanii. Moscow, 1994; Izbrannoe (Selections)S, 2 vols. Moscow, 1997; Neizvestnaia Berberova. Roman, stikhi, stat'i. St. Petersburg, 1998. Bez zakata. Malen'kaia devochka. Rasskazy ne o liubvi. Stikhi. Moscow, 1999
Recent editions: “Perepiska” in Uchenova, V. (ed.), Dacha na Petergofskoi doroge. Moscow, 1986.
Recent editions: Gorodskoi angel: Izbrannoe (Selections)rannye stikhi. Brussels, 1989; Nochnye ptitsy. Brussels, 1990. Villa “Nadezhda”: stikhi, rasskazy. Moscow, 1992
Recent editions: Grasskii dnevnik. Rasskazy. Olivkovyi sad. Moscow, 1995
Recent editions: Izbrannoe (Selections). Moscow, 1991; Vospominaniia, stat'i, ocherki, 2 vols. Paris, 1992; Zhatva dukha; repr. Tomsk, 1994; Nashe vremia eshche ne razgadano: Stikhi, vosp., pis'ma. Tomsk, 1996
Recent editions: Liubov’ k shesterym. Moscow, 1994; the latter and Telo included in Anna Mar, Zhenshchina na kreste. Moscow, 1994
Recent editions: Na beregakh Nevy. Moscow, 1988; Na beregakh Seny. Moscow, 1989; Izbrannoe (Selections)r. Moscow, 1998
Recent editions: Nostal'giia: rasskazy, vospominaniia. Leningrad, 1989; Iumoristicheskie rasskazy. Moscow, 1990; Vybor kresta. Moscow, 1991; Zhit'e-byt'e: Rasskazy, vospominaniia. Moscow, 1991; Smeshnoe v pechal'nom. Moscow, 1992; Demonicheskaia zhenshchina. Moscow, 1995; Sobranie sochinenii (Collected works), 5 vols. Moscow, 1998
Recent editions: Posle vsego: Stikhi 1920 — 1942. Alma-Ata, 1993
Recent editions: Povesti i rasskazy. 1963, 1984; Uchenova, V. (ed.), Svidanie. Moscow, 1987., in Uchenova, V. (ed.), Svidanie. Moscow, 1987.; poems in Poety 1840—1850-kh godov, ed. B. Ia. Bukhshtab. Leningrad, 1972; Bannikov,N. V. (ed.), Russkie poetessy XIX veka. Moscow, 1979.; Uchenova, V. (ed.), Tsaritsy muz: russkie poetessy XIX-nachala XXvv. Moscow, 1989.
Recent editions: Semeistvo Tal'nikovykh. Leningrad, 1992; Russkie povesti XIX veka: 40—50 godov, 2 (1952); Tri strany sveta, Mertvoe ozero, in N. A. Nekrasov, Polnoe sobranie sochinenii (Complete collected works), vols. IX, X. Leningrad, 1984—5; Vospominaniia (1889, 1890; various edns from 1927—1972); Stepnaia baryshnia, in Uchenova, V. (ed.), Dacha na Petergofskoi doroge. Moscow, 1986.; Rasskaz v pis'makh, in Iakushin,N.I. (ed.), “Serdtsa chutkogo prozren'em”… Povesti i rasskazy russkikh pisatel'nits XIXV. Moscow 1991.
Recent editions: Sobranie sochinenii (Collected works). The Hague, 1990
Recent editions: V poiskakh Nabokova. Otrazheniia. Moscow, 1991
Recent editions: Vsia moia zhizn’: stikhotvoreniia i vospominaniia ob otse. Riga, 1987
Recent editions: Zdes’ shumiat chuzhie goroda. Moscow, 1996
Recent editions: Zhenshchina na kreste. Moscow, 1994
Recent editions: Marko Vovchok. Tvory v semy tomakh. Kiev, 1964—66; Lyst y do Marka Vovchka v dvokh tomakh. Kiev. 1979, 1984; Tri doli in Svidanie. Institutka, in Iakushin,N.I. (ed.), “Serdtsa chutkogo prozren'em”… Povesti i rasskazy russkikh pisatel'nits XIXV. Moscow 1991.
Recent editions: poems in Poety 1790—1810-kh godov, ed. Iu. M. Lotman. Leningrad, 1974; Bannikov,N. V. (ed.), Russkie poetessy XIX veka. Moscow, 1979.; Uchenova, V. (ed.), Tsaritsy muz: russkie poetessy XIX-nachala XXvv. Moscow, 1989.
Screenplays and scripts: with Georgii Daneliia, Dzhentl'meny udachi: neliricheskaia komediia. Moscow, 1971; with Georgii Daneliia, Sovsem propashchii; with Revaza Gabriadze and Georgii Daneliia, Mimino. Moscow, 1978; Eksprompt-fantaziia. Moscow, 1982
Screenplays: “Fe Li Ni”: Fedoseeva Lidiia Nikolaevna. Moscow, 1989
Semero. Harbin, 1930
Solo 13 (1994). Special Women's Issue
Writings: Brennye pesni. Harbin, 1943
Writings: Chasti chast’. Paris, 1985; V obratnom napravlenii. Paris, 1989; Kalancha: Gendernaia lirika. New York, 1995; with Alfred Corn and Michel Gèrard, Geomnesic Observatory. Metz, 1990
Writings: Vecher. St. Petersburg, 1912; Chetki. St. Petersburg, 1913; Belaia staia. Petrograd, 1917; Podorozhnik. Petrograd, 1921; Anno Domini, MCMXXI. Petrograd, 1922; Iz shesti knig. Leningrad, 1940; Izbrannoe (Selections). Tashkent, 1943; Izbrannoe (Selections)rannye stikhi. Moscow, 1946; Stikhotvoreniia. Moscow, 1958; Requiem. Munich, 1963; Beg vremeni. Moscow and Leningrad, 1965; Stikhotvoreniia i poemy. Leningrad, 1976; Soch. Moscow, 1988; Soch. 2 vols. Moscow, 1990
Writings: “Antonina,” Kometa (1851); Plemiannitsa, 1851; Dolg, Sovremennik 11 (1851); Dve sestry, OZ (1851); Tri pory zhizni, 1854; “Krymskie pis'ma,” Sanktpeterburgskie vedomosti (St. Petersburg News), (1853—1854); Zakoldovannyi krug, Otechestvennye zapiski (Notes of the Fatherland) 1—2 (1854); Starushka, Russkii vestnik (Russian Herald) 1 (1856); Writings for children include: Semeistvo Shalonskikh, 1880; Kniazhna Dubrovina, 1886; Sergei Bor-Ramenskii, 1888; Zhizn’ Sviatogo Makariia Egipetskogo, 1885, and a reworking of Bulwer-Lytton's The Last Days of Pompeii (Poslednie dni Pompei, 1883, 1991)
Writings: “Bezobraznyi muzh,” Sovremennik 8 (1848); “Zhena chasovogo mastera,” Sovremennik 13 (1849); “Zhenskaia dolia,” Sovremennik 92—93 (1862); Roman v Peterburgskom polusvete, 1869; and two novels co-written with Nikolai Nekrasov, Tri strany sveta, 1849, and Mertvoe ozero, 1851
Writings: “Bron'ka,” Ogonek 52 (1989); “Za kapustoi,” Krest'ianka 2 (1989); “Bumazhnaia pobeda” and “Schastlivyi sluchai,” Krest'ianka 3 (1990); “Doch’ Bukhary,” Russkaia mysl'(Russian Thought)' (1990) also in Ogonek 2 (1991); “Genele-Sumochnitsa,” Novoe russkoe slovo (April 20, 1990); “Narod Izbrannoe (Selections)rannyi,” Kontinent 65 (1990) also in Piatyi ugol, ed. Sergei Kaledin. Moscow, 1991; “Vtorogo marta togo goda,” Russkaia mysl'(Russian Thought)' (July 26 and August 9, 1991); “Sonechka,” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 7 (1992); “Devochki,” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 2 (1994); “Gulia,” Oktiabr’ 2 (1994); Bednye rodstvenniki (sbornik). Moscow, 1994; 1995; “Medeia i ee deti,” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 3—4 (1996); Medeia i ee deti: Povesti. Moscow, 1996, 1997; Lialin dom: Povesti i rasskazy. Moscow, 1999; Veselye pokhorony: Povest’ i rasskazy. Moscow, 1998, 1999 and Novyi mir (NewWorld) 7 (1998); Medeia i ee deti; Sonechka. Moscow, 1999; with G. Shcherbakova and others, “Vyrazhaetsia sil'no rossiiskii narod !” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 2 (1999); Kazus kukotskogo. Moscow, 2000
Writings: “Chezare,” Zhurnal sodruzhestva 9 (1935); “Proshchenoe voskresen'e,” Zhurnal sodruzhestva 2 (1936); “Izumrudnyi persten’,” Zhurnal sodruzhestva 6 (1936); “Plant goroda Sankt-Peterburga,” Zhurnal sodruzhestva 7 (1936); “Zheleznye tiul'pany,” Zhurnal sodruzhestva 8—9 (1936); “Praktiki radi,” Zhurnal sodruzhestva 5 (1937); “Oleni,” Zhurnal sodruzhestva 7 (1937); “Alesha,” 8—9 (1937); “Vstrecha,” Zhurnal sodruzhestva 11 (1937); “Na elke u printsa,” Zhurnal sodruzhestva 12 (1937); “Pis'mo poeta,” Zhurnal sodruzhestva 38 (1938); Ten’ sinego marta. Riga, 1938; Dama tref. Sbornik rasskazov. Munich, 1946; Dipilogicheskaia azbuka. Munich, 1946; Korolevstvo Alykh Bashen. Rozhdestvenskie rasskazy. Munich, 1947; “Professor istorii,” Literaturnyi sovremennik 3 (1952); “Vara,” Grani 19 (1953); Bessmertnyi lebed’ (Anna Pavlova). New York, 1956; Razgovor molcha. Sbornik stikhov. Munich, 1956; Kopilka vremeni. Rasskazy. Munich, 1957; Posle… Munich, 1961; Korabli starogo goroda. Istoricheskii roman iz zhizni russkoi Baltiki 1924—1944. Munich, 1963; Gorshochek nezhnosti, 1965; Schastlivoe zerkalo. Rasskazy. Munich, 1966; O nas. Roman. Munich, 1972; Korolevstvo. Munich, 1976
Writings: “Chuzhoi dnevnik,” Novaia iunost’ 5—6 (1994); “Iz teni v svet pereletaia,” Znamia 8 (1994); Prazdnik starukh na more. Vologda, 1998
Writings: “Den’ smerti,” in Vstrechnyi khod. Moscow, 1989; “Suslik,” “Za saigakami,” “Zvonkoe imia,” “Schast'e,” “Kto ikh poliubit?” “Tsaritsa Tamara,” in Zhenskaia logika, comp. Stepanenko and Fomenko. Moscow, 1989; “Zvonkoe imia,” in Chisten'kaia zhizn’, comp. A. Shavkuta. Moscow, 1990; Vasilenko, Svetlana (comp.), Novye amazonki. Moscow, 1991.. (includes the compiler's story “Duratskie rasskazy”); Shamara. Moscow, 1991; Zvonkoe imia. Moscow, 1991; “Dva rasskaza,” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 9 (1997); “Durochka,” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 11 (1998); Durochka. Moscow, 2000
Writings: “Eto moe okno,” Sibirskie ogni 7 (1977); “Novoe znakomstvo,” Teatr 4 (1986); Poka zhivye. VAAP, 1987; Chudnaia baba. Moscow, 1989, staged in US as “Wonderbroad”; “Devochka noch'iu,” in Vstrechnyi khod. Moscow, 1989. Issued separately, Moscow, 1992; “Ekhai,” Teatr 6 (1989); Ved'miny slezki: kniga prozy. Novosibirsk, 1990; Moscow, 1994; “Pronikshie,” in Ne pomniashchaia zla (a suite of stories including “Blesnulo,” “Milen'kii, ryzhen'kii,” “Kol'tsa,” “Dve nevesty,” “Shelkovistye volosy,” “Chervivyi synok,” “Zlye devushki,” “Siniaia ruka,” “Zamerzli,” and “Ved'miny slezki”); “Krasnyi paradiz” and “Morokob,” Siuzhety 1 (1990); “Chto-to otkroetsia,” in Vidimost’ nas. Moscow, 1991; “Krasnyi paradiz (P'esa v I akte),” in Novye amazonki; “Cherti, suki, komunnal'nye kozly …,” Teatr 6 (1992); “Iug,” Znamia 10 (1992); “Milen'kii, ryzhen'kii,” Teatr 8 (1992); Stories in Soglasie, 1992 and Ural, 1993; Devochka noch'iu. Moscow, 1993; “Slepye pesni,” Znamia 10 (1995) (the third part of her novel Sad); “Zaikusha. Povest’,” Strelets 2 (1995); Nemets. Roman, Znamia 6 (1997); “O realizme prizrachnogo,” Zolotoi vek 10 (1997); Sad. Vologda, 1997; “Som-s-usom,” Zolotoi vek 10 (1997); Obmorok: kniga pes. Vologda, 1999; “Zapreshcheno,” Znamia 2 (1999); Chudesnye znaki. Moscow, 2000
Writings: “Even though … Poems.” Hong Kong, 1975. “Nam ulybalas’ Kvan ln’. Litsa skvoz’ vremia,” Rossiiane v Azii 7 (2000), 151—97. Also memoirs
Writings: “Ideal”, Biblioteka dlia chteniia (Library for Reading), 1837; Vospominaniia Zheleznovodska. 1837; Dzhellaledin, Biblioteka dlia chteniia (Library for Reading) 1837; Utballa. 1838; Sud sveta, Biblioteka dlia chteniia (Library for Reading) 1839; Teofaniia Abbiadzhio, Biblioteka dlia chteniia (Library for Reading) 1841; Liubin'ka, Otechestvennye zapiski (Notes of the Fatherland) 1842; Polnoe sobranie sochinenii (Complete collected works). 6 vols. St. Petersburg, 1905; Ideal, in Russkaia romanticheskaia povest’, ed. V. I. Sakharov. Moscow, 1992; Sud sveta, in Uchenova, V. (ed.), Dacha na Petergofskoi doroge. Moscow, 1986.; Naprasnyi dar, in Iakushin,N.I. (ed.), “Serdtsa chutkogo prozren'em”… Povesti i rasskazy russkikh pisatel'nits XIXV. Moscow 1991.
Writings: “Ideal,” Mir bozhii 11 (1898); “Religiia krasoty,” Russkoe bogatstvo (RussianWealth) 1 (1899); “Iz mira detskikh igr,” Russkaia shkola 3 (1906); “Emil Vekharn. Stikhi o sovremennosti v perevode V. Briusova,” Vesy 8 (1906); “Stikhotvoreniia,” Russkaia mysl'(Russian Thought)' 8 (1909); Stikhotvoreniia. Moscow, 1910; “O tom chego ne bylo,” Russkaia mysl'(Russian Thought)' 5 (1911); “Aleksei Remizov. Posolon,” Russkaia mysl'(Russian Thought)' 5 (1911); Stikhi i proza, 2 vols. Moscow, 1993
Writings: “Letnaia kartinka,” Artist 23 (1892); Schast'e. St. Petersburg, 1898; Stranichki zhizni. St. Petersburg, 1898; Iz zhenskikh pisem. Stikhotvoreniia. Moscow, 1898; Nezametnye liudi. Moscow, 1900; Na solntse i v teni. Moscow, 1904; Neotpravlennye pis'ma i drugie rasskazy. Moscow, 1906; Schastlivaia zhenshchina. Moscow, 1911; Oblaka. Moscow, 1912; Dramaticheskie perevody 2—3. Moscow, 1911—1914; Otzvuki voiny. Moscow, 1915; Dni moei zhizni. Moscow, 1928; Ermolova. Moscow, 1972; “Pervyi bal,” in Uchenova, V. (ed.), Tol'ko chas. Moscow, 1988.
Writings: “Lozh’,” in Korabli. Moscow, 1907; “Iz tsikla “Pesni liubvi,” in Almanakh Kristall. Khar'kov, 1908; Sanctus Amor. St. Petersburg, 1908; Nakanune. Unpublished, 1922–4
Writings: “M.Kh.,” “Ugolok teatral'nogo mira,” Russkii vestnik (Russian Herald) 2 (1885); “Lëlia. Rasskaz iz teatral'nogo byta,” Russkii vestnik (Russian Herald) 8—9 (1885); “Rannie grozy,” Russkii vestnik (Russian Herald) 8, 10–12 (1886); Rannie grozy. St. Petersburg, 1889; 2nd edn, 1892; 3rd edn, 1904; “Nemudrenye,” Russkii vestnik (Russian Herald) 9 (1889); Romany i povesti, 2 vols. St. Petersburg, 1889; 1892; “Artistka,” Vestnik Evropy (Herald of Europe) 4—12 (1891), and St. Petersburg, 1896; 2nd edn., Moscow, 1903; “Syn,” Vestnik Evropy (Herald of Europe) 11—12 (1893); “Zhenskaia zhizn’. Povest’ v pis'makh,” Severnyi vestnik (Northern Herald) 11—12 (1894), 1 (1895), and Mir bozhii 2—4 (1903); Syn i drugie rasskazy. Moscow, 1904; Romany i povesti, 2 vols. St. Petersburg, 1896; 2nd edn., Moscow, 1904; “Vopl’,” RMys1—2 (1900), in Ispoved’ Mytishcheva. Moscow, 1903, and in Uchenova, V. (ed.), Tol'ko chas. Moscow, 1988.
Writings: “My,” Chisla 10 (1934); Priblizheniia. Paris, 1934; “Skuka,” Krug 1 (1936); Rassvety. Paris, 1937; “Ozhidanie,” Krug 3 (1938); “V posledniuiu minutu,” in Literaturnyi smotr. Paris, 1939; Dvenadtsat’ mesiatsev. Paris, 1956
Writings: “Ne pomniashchaia zla,” in Ne pomniashchaia zla, comp. L. Vaneeva. Moscow, 1990; “Ty khorosho nauchilsia est’, Adam,” in Vasilenko, Svetlana (comp.), Novye amazonki. Moscow, 1991.
Writings: “Nedelia kak nedelia,” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 11 (1969). Also published in Copenhagen, 1973, Paris, 1976; “Muzhchiny, beregite zhenshchin,” Literaturnaia gazeta (Literary Gazette) 46 (1971); “Chemu raven iks?” Iunost’ 5 (1974); Otritsatel'naia Zhizel’. Moscow, 1977; Zhenshchina s zontikom. Moscow, 1981; Portret podarennyi drugu. Leningrad, 1981; Den’ pominoveniia: roman, povest’. Moscow, 1989; “Avtobiografiia bez umolchanii,” Grani 156 (1990); Avtobus s chernoi polosoi. “Ptitsa Rasskaz,” Grani 166 (1992); “Vstrecha.” “Lesnaia poliana.” “Udivitel'nye shariki.” “Portret Zoiki na fone dvora,” Grani 168 (1993); Stranstvie bezdomnykh. Moscow, 1999
Writings: “Plan pervogo litsa: I vtorogo,” in Vstrechnyi khod: Sbornik. Moscow, 1989; “Vidimost’ nas,” Strelets 3 (1989), and in Litsei na Chistykh Prudakh. Moskovskii krug. Sbornik. Moscow, 1991; Ravnovesie sveta dnevnykh i nochnykh zvezd. Moscow, 1990, excerpted in Iunost’ 8 (1988); “Ad kak Da/aD kak dA,” in Ne pomniashchaia zla; comp. L. Vaneeva; “Okolo ekolo …,” Iunost’ 3 (1990); “Probeg_pro beg,” Znamia 5 (1990); “Velikoe knia,” Iunost’ 12 (1991); “Skvoz’” (MS); Okolo ekolo_: povesti. Moscow, 1992. Title story also appears in Vasilenko, Svetlana (comp.), Novye amazonki. Moscow, 1991.; “ … i puteshestvie,” Znamia 6 (1996); “Devochka pokazyvaet,” Znamia 3 (1998); Vremia v puti. Moscow, 1997
Writings: “Priznak odnogo tallintsa, ili Gebel’ Odessy” and “Razvenenie rybok,” Zhenskaia logika, ed. L. V. Stepanenko and A. V. Fomenko. Moscow, 1989; Iz kuba: Rasskazy, povest’. Moscow, 1990; Ne pomniashchaia zla, comp. L. Vaneeva. Moscow, 1990. Includes the compiler's story, “Mezhdu Saturnom i Uranom (Teni)”; Skorb’ po ploti. Kubicheskii traktat i rasskazy. Moscow, 1990; “Venetsianskie zerkala,” Chisten'kaia zhizn’; Igra tuchi s dozhdem. Moscow, 1991; “Antigrekh,” in Novye amazonki; “Snovidets (… snov),” in Eros, syn Afrodity, comp. S. Markov. Moscow, 1991; Igra tuchi s dozhdem. Moscow, 1991; “Proshchenoe voskresen'e,” Novaia Evropa 7 (1995); “Novye rasskazy,” Den’ i noch’ 3 (1996), includes “Sestra-bludnitsa,” “Dom na bolote,” and “Ulovka kontseptsii”; “Dva rasskaza,” Oktiabr’ 1 (1998); “Takuiu ne znaiu; Zdes’ i seichas proizkhodit takoe,” Literaturnaia ucheba 2 (1998); “Dom na bolote,” Zolotoi vek 13 (1999)
Writings: “Samoubiistvo: iz dnevnika bezhenki,” Illiustrirovannaia Rossiia 84 (1926); “Finiki,” Zveno 228 (1927); Neskvoznaia nit’. Paris, 1929; Mara. Paris, 1931; “La vie et l'oeuvre de Pèguy,” in Les cahiers de la quinzaine, 1931; with Jean Maxence, Charles Peguy. Textes suivie de debats au Studio franco-russe. Paris, 1931; “Belye kryl'ia,” Volia Rossii 3 (1929); “L'exil des enfants,” in Les cahiers de la quinzaine, 1936; The Humiliated Christ in Modern Russian Thought. London and New York, 1938; Saint Tikhon Zadonsky, Inspirer of Dostoevsky. London, 1951
Writings: “Shkatulka s zerkalom. Ob odnom glubinnom motive A. A. Akhmatovoi,” Uchenye zapiski Tartusskogo gosudarstvennogo universiteta 641 (Trudy po znakovym sistemam), 17 (1984), 93—108; Vrata, okna, arki: Izbrannoe (Selections)rannye stikhotvoreniia. Paris, 1986; Kitaiskoe puteshestvie, stely i nadpisi, starye pesni. Moscow, 1990; “O granitsakh poezii. Velimir Khlebnikov v noveishikh zarubezhnykh issledovaniiakh,” in Russkaia literatura v zarubezhnykh issledovaniiakh 1980-kh godov. Moscow, 1990, 46—75; “O pogibshem literaturnom pokolenii: pamiati Leni Gubanova,” Volga 6 (1990), 135—46; “Mednyi vsadnik: kompositsiia konflikta,” Rossiia-Russia 7 (Marsilio Editori, 1991), 39—55; “Vospominaniia o Venedikte Erofeeve,” Teatr 9 (1991), 98—103; “Zametki i vospominaniia o raznykh stikhotvoreniiakh, a takzhe POKHVALA POEZII,” Volga 6 (1991), 135—64; with M. Gasparov, “Dialogi o Bakhtine,” Novyi krug 1 (Kiev, 1991), 113—17; “Znak, smysl, vest’,” in Nezamechennaia zemlia. Moscow and St. Petersburg, 1992, 249—52; “Puteshestvie v Briansk,” Volga 5—6 (1992), 138—57; “Muzhestvo i posle nego: zametki perevodchika Muzhestva byt’ P. Tillikha,” Strana i mir 3: 69 (May—June, 1992), 159—70; Stikhi. Moscow, 1994; “Frantsisk, chelovek tainstvennyi,” Literaturnoe obozrenie (Literary Review) 3—4 (1994), 69—76; “Rassuzhdenie o metode,” NLitO 27 (1997), 177—90; “V Geraklitovu reku vtoroi raz ne voidesh’,” Znamia 6 (1998), 190—5; with V. Bibikhin, et al., Nashe polozhenie: obraz nastoiashchego. Moscow, 2000
Writings: “Svidanie,” Zveno 161 (1926); “Shimpanze,” Zveno 167, 168 (1926); “Vera, nadezhda, liubov’,” Zveno 179 (1926); “Kurnosaia,” Zveno 216 (1926); “Zhitets,” Zveno 3 (1927); “Kum,” Sovremennye zapiski 38 (1929); Pamiati Tvoei: Rasskazy. Paris, 1930; “Konrad Meistergauzen,” Illiustrirovannaia Rossiia 310—12 (1931); “Zlaia vechnost’,” Sovremennye zapiski 48 (1931), 49 (1932); “Meduza,” in Pestrye rasskazy, ed. V. Aleksandrova. New York, 1953; V rasseianii sushchie. Paris, 1959; Arc-en ciel. Vaduz, 1968; “Sekret Anny Ivanovnoi,” in Russkaia zhenshchina v emigratsii. San Francisco, 1970; “My i oni. Otryvok iz knigi Razgovor s soboi,” Ekho 1 (1978)
Writings: “Tvoia nemyslimaia chistota,” Literaturnoe obozrenie (Literary Review) 6 (1987); “Figurka na ogolennom pole,” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 11 (1988); “Pust’ budet dver’ otkryta,” Literaturnoe obozrenie (Literary Review) 2 (1988); “Otpechatok ognia,” Literaturnoe obozrenie (Literary Review) 12 (1989); “Kompozitsiia na krasnom i sinem,” Sobesednik 12 (1989); “Evgesha i Annushka,” Znamia 7 (1990); “Den’ topolinogo pukha,” in Vasilenko, Svetlana (comp.), Novye amazonki. Moscow, 1991. and Novyi zhurnal (New Review) 180 (1991); “Kabiria s Obvodnogo Kanala,” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 3 (1991); Otdelenie propashchikh. Moscow. 1991; “Skazki Andersena,” in Moskovskii krug. Moscow, 1991. “Den’ imperii,” Zvezda 7 (1993); “Pritvorotnoe zel'e,” Volga 12 (1993); “Reis,” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 3 (1993); “Mestorozhdenie vetra,” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 12 (1994); Mestorozhdenie vetra. St. Petersburg, 1998; Long Distance, ili Slavianskii aktsent. Moscow, 2000
Writings: “V noch’ pered Rozhdestvom,” suppl. to Nedelia 1 (1887); Likhie podarki. 1890; 8th edn., 1912; “Pastoral,” in Sbornik na pomoshch’ uchashchimsia zhenshchinam. Moscow, 1901; Pavliuk. Saratov, 1904; 3rd edn, Moscow, 1912; “Utrennichki” i drugie rasskazy. Moscow, 1905; Letiashchie teni. Rasskazy. St. Petersburg, 1912; “Bez zaveta,” Sovremennyi mir 10 (1913); “Lunnyi svet,” Russkaia mysl'(Russian Thought)' 4—5 (1914); Sobranie sochinenii (Collected works), vol. I Lunnyi svet; vol. II Mudrost’ zhizni. Petrograd, 1916; Babushka kommunizma Klara Tsetlin. Moscow, 1924; Bol'shaia dusha (N. K. Krupskaia). Moscow and Leningrad, 1924; U kornia. 1904—1906. Moscow and Leningrad, 1926; 2nd edn, Moscow, 1927; Polden’. Rasskazy. Moscow and Leningrad, 1927
Writings: “V ozhidanii Zolotogo Veka.” Oktiabr’, 6 (1989); Irov den’. Moscow, 1992; “Dedal i Gerkules, ili neskol'ko rassuzhdenii o pol'ze i bespoleznosti,” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 5 (1993); “Demokratiia i svoboda,” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 6 (1994); “Iskusstvo striazhaniia,” Znanie-sila 1 (1995); Kolduny i imperiia. Saratov, 1996; “Povest’ o blagonravnom miatezhnike,” Zvezda 3 (1996); Sto polei. St. Petersburg, 1996; Kolduny i ministry. St. Petersburg, 1997; “Kak general Dzhekson s amerikanskim Tsentrobankom voeval,” Zvezda 2 (1998); Okhota na iziubria. Moscow, 1999; Insaider. Moscow, 1999; Delo o propavshem boge. Moscow, 1999; Razbor poletov. Moscow, 2000; Stal'noi korol’. Moscow, 2000; Sarancha. Moscow, 2000; Zdravstvuite, ia vashaKrysha.” Moscow, 2000
Writings: “V sumerkakh,” Russkoe bogatstvo (RussianWealth) 6 (1905); “Tvorimoe tvorchestvo,” Zolotoe runo (Golden Fleece) 11 — 12 (1908); “Kholodnyi sochel'nik,” Slovo, 1908; as F. Sologub, “Aisedora Dunkan v prozreniiakh Fredrikha Nitsshe,” Zolotoe runo (Golden Fleece) 4 (1909); “Zhenshchina nastoiashchego i budushchego,” Trudy pervogo vserossiiskogo zhenskogo s’ ‘ezda. St. Petersburg, 1909; “Staryi dom,” Zemlia 3(1909); “Put’ v Damask,” in Shipovnik. 1910; “Liubov’ nad bezdnami,” in Al’ manakh shipovnik, 1910, and separately St. Petersburg, 1913; O Fedore Sologube. St. Petersburg, 1911; as F. Sologub, Mechtapobeditel'nitsa. St. Petersburg, 1912; “Zelenyi bum,” in Nebokory: VIII al’ manakh ego-futuristov. St. Petersburg, 1913; “Po povodu nekotorikh iubileev,” in Ocharovannyi strannik, Al'manakh intuitivnoi kritiki i poezii. St. Petersburg, 1913; ed., Liubov'v pis’ makh vydaiushchikhsia liudei XVII i XIX veka. Moscow, 1913; Kamen’ broshennyi v vodu. St. Petersburg, 1915; Shchit: Literaturnyi sbornik. Moscow, 1915; ed., Rossiia v rodnykh pesniakh. Petrograd, 1915; ed., Voina v russkoi poezii. Petrograd, 1915; Zhenshchina nakanune Revoliutsii 1789 g. Petrograd, 1922
Writings: “Vostochnyi prints,” in Studencheskie gody, 1 (1922); “Zygmus’,” Novyi dom, 3 (1927); “Pervyi liubovnik,” Illiustrirovannaia Rossiia 283 (1930); Utro. Paris, 1930; Prolog. Paris, 1933; Olivkovyi sad: Stikhi 1923—29. Paris, 1937; “Na vershine kholma,” in Pestrye rasskazy, ed. V. Aleksandrova. New York, 1953; “Potselui svidaniia,” Novyi zhurnal (New Review) 36 (1954); Grasskii dnevnik. Washington DC, 1967
Writings: “Warum?” Russkoe bogatstvo (RussianWealth) 2 (1899); “Na poroge zhizni. Stranichka iz biografii dvukh sovremennits,” Russkoe bogatstvo (RussianWealth) 4 (1900); “Iubilei redaktora,” Russkoe bogatstvo (RussianWealth) 5 (1900); “Pervyi shag,” Obrazovanie (1902); “Ivan Fedorovich,” Russkoe bogatstvo (RussianWealth) 1 (1903); “Bez illiuzii,” Russkoe bogatstvo (RussianWealth) 11—12 (1903); Ocherki i rasskazy. St. Petersburg, 1903; 2nd edn, 1912; “U teplogo moria,” Russkoe bogatstvo (RussianWealth) 7—8 (1909); “Dinastiia,” Russkoe bogatstvo (RussianWealth) 4—6 (1910), repr. Bez illiuzii (1911), and in Uchenova, Uchenova, V. (ed.), Tol'ko chas. Moscow, 1988.. Moscow, 1988; Bez illiuzii. Rasskazy. St. Petersburg, 1911; Tsepi—pered rassvetom. St. Petersburg, 1911; “Bezzabotnye,” Russkoe bogatstvo (RussianWealth) 5—7 (1912); “Iz reporterskikh vospominanii,” Golos minuvshego 7—8 (1913); “Triasina,” 8—9 (1914); Rasskazy. Moscow, 1919; “Elizaveta Nikolaevna Vodovozova-Semevskaia,” Golos minuvshego 3 (1923)
Writings: A zemlia nasha prekrasna. Moscow, 1956; 2nd edn, 1960; Stikhi. Moscow, 1971; Sud'ba. Moscow, 1981; Ia chast’ Rusi. Cheliabinsk, 1986
Writings: Armiia pesen. Harbin, 1928; Gospodi, spasi Rossiiu. Harbin, 1930; Perezvony. Harbin, 1930; Ne pokorius’ ! Harbin, 1932; Na zvon mechei. Harbin, 1934; Mednyi gul. Shanghai, 1937
Writings: Bezymiannyi den’: stikhi. Moscow, 1977; Zemlia i dom. Moscow, 1986; Bol'shaia Polianka. Moscow, 1991; Pogovorim o strannostiakh liubvi. Vilnius, 1991; Stikhi i proza. Moscow, 1992; V ozhidanii Edipa: Stikhi i proza. Moscow, 1993; “I drugoe, drugoe, drugoe …_” Voprosy literatury (Questions of Literature) 6 (1995); Stikhi o stikhakh. Moscow, 1996; Zametki, zapisi, shtrikhi. Moscow, 1997; “Uiutnyi dom s vidom na bezdnu,” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 6 (1997); Sploshnye prazdniki. Moscow, 1998; Mezhdu oblakom i iamoi. Moscow, 1999
Writings: Chelovek, reka i most. Povesti i rasskazy. Moscow, 1976; Okna na dvor. Moscow, 1976; Bremia molodosti (ocherki). Moscow, 1978; Vorota i novyi gorod. Ocherki. Moscow, 1978; Doma i liudi. Moscow, 1979; O liubvi materinskoi, dochernei, vozvyshennoi i zemnoi. Povesti, rasskazy, ocherki. Moscow, 1979; Elena Prekrasnaia. Moscow, 1982; Postoronnie v dome. Povesti. Moscow, 1983; Vnutrennii dvor. Moscow, 1986; Posle prazdnika. Moscow, 1988; Printsessa. Moscow, 1999
Writings: Chernye immorteli. Harbin, 1929; Misticheskie rozy. Shanghai, 1946
Writings: Dal'nee derevo. Erevan, 1968; Prednaznachenie. Moscow, 1983; Cherta gorizonta. Erevan, 1986; Izbrannoe (Selections). Moscow, 1991; Koster v nochi. Iaroslavl’, 1991
Writings: Das Nordlicht. Dresden, 1833; Les prèludes. Paris, 1839; Stikhotvoreniia. Moscow, 1863; Sobranie sochinenii (Collected works). 2 vols., ed. Valerii Briusov. Moscow, 1915; Polnoe sobranie stikhotvorenii. Moscow and Leningrad, 1964; Stikhotvoreniia. Moscow, 1985. Poems in Bannikov,N. V. (ed.), Russkie poetessy XIX veka. Moscow, 1979.; Uchenova, V. (ed.), Tsaritsy muz: russkie poetessy XIX nachala XXvv. Moscow, 1989.; Moskovskaia muza 1799—1997, ed. G. D. Klimova. Moscow, 1998
Writings: Degi dlia killera. Moscow, 1997, 1998; Tonkaia shtuchka. Moscow, 1997; Ia-vashi nepriiatnosti. Moscow, 1997; Stroptivaia mishen’. Moscow, 1998; Ee malenkaia taina. Moscow, 1998, 1999; Zhestokii mir muzhchin. Moscow, 1998; Kak by ne tak. Moscow, 1998, 1999; Moi liubimyi killer. Moscow, 1999; Nevinnye damskie shalosti. Moscow, 1998; Sestrichki ne promakh. Moscow, 1998; Chego khochet zhenshchina. Moscow, 1999; Kapkan na sponsora. Moscow, 1999; Chumovaia damochka. Moscow, 1999; Otpetye plutovki. Moscow, 1999; Cherta s dva. Moscow, 1999; Ovechka v volchei shkure. Moscow, 2000; Ia-vashi nepriiatnosti. Moscow, 2000; Baryshnia i khuligan. Moscow, 2000. For more references, see http://www.eksmo.ru
Writings: Derevenskie rasskazy. Moscow, 1892; “Po derevniam,” Vestnik Evropy (Herald of Europe) 10—11 (1896); Rasskazy. St. Petersburg, 1896; Rasskazy i povesti. St. Petersburg, 1906; Povesti i rasskazy. St. Petersburg, 1909; Chervonnyi khutor. St. Petersburg, 1912; Khar'kov, 1925; Rasskazy. St. Petersburg, 1913; Povesti i rasskazy, 3 vols. Petrograd, 1916; Tak bylo: Put’ moei zhizni: Moscow and Leningrad, 1930. Povesti i rasskazy. Moscow, 1976; Povesti. Rasskazy. Voronezh, 1983; “Pchely zhuzhzhat,” in Uchenova, V. (ed.), Tol'ko chas. Moscow, 1988., ed. Uchenova. Moscow, 1988
Writings: Detskimi glazami na mir. Harbin, 1937; Shanghai, 1947; U poroga v mir. Harbin, 1942; Shanghai, 1947; Put’ cherez mir. Shanghai, 1946
Writings: Dlia Izbrannoe (Selections)rannykh. Moscow, 1844; Stikhotvoreniia 1854, 1855, 1856. St. Petersburg, 1856; Chudo-Iudo. Skazka v stikhakh. St. Petersburg, 1866; Sharlotta Korde. St. Petersburg, 1866
Writings: Donets. Moscow, 1833; Starina. Moscow, 1839; Danilo Besschastnyi. St. Petersburg, 1876
Writings: Dvadtsat’ odno. Brussels, 1928; Ukhod. Brussels, 1934; Doroga. Tallin, 1935; Vie d'Alexandre Pouchkine. Brussels, 1937; Insomnies. Poémes. Brussels, 1939; Europe et Valèrius. Paris, 1949; Sortie de secours. Paris, 1952; Le dialogue des aveugles. Paris, 1955; La parole devient sang. Paris, 1955; Jeu des massacres. Paris, 1956; Ma Russie habillèe en U. R. S. S. Paris, 1958; La vie quotidienneáMoscou au XVIIe siecle. Paris, 1963; La vie quotidienneáSt. Petersbourg a l’èpoque romantique. Paris, 1967; Tel est mon siécle: I. Lumiéres et ombres. Paris, 1964; II. Une maniére de vivre. Paris, 1965; III. La folle Clio. Paris, 1966; IV. La drôle de paix. Paris, 1967; Pered snom. Paris, 1970; Otrazheniia. Paris, 1975; Rasskazy, stat'i, stikhi. Paris, 1978; V poiskakh Nabokova. Paris, 1979
Writings: Dvor chudes: stikhi, 1920—21. Petrograd, 1922; “Serdtse Marii,” Zveno 157 (1926); “Epilog,” Zveno 163 (1926); “Dom na peske,” Zveno 173—4 (1926); “Zhasminovyi ostrov,” Zveno 193 (1926); “Rumynka,” Zveno 200 (1926); “Putanitsa,” Zveno 206 (1927); “Sukhaia soloma,” Novyi dom 3 (1927); “Eliseiskie polia,” Zveno 212—13 (1927); “Zhizn’ madam Diuklo,” Zveno 6 (1927); Angel smerti. Paris, 1927, 1938; “Prazdnik,” Illiustrirovannia Rossiia. 209 (1929); “Valentin,” I lliustrirovannia Rossiia 219 (1929); “Roza na snegu,” I lliustrirovannia Rossiia 250 (1930); Izol'da. Paris, 1929; Berlin, 1931; Zerkalo. Brussels, 1939; Kontrapunkt: stikhi. Paris, 1951; Stikhi, napisannye vo vremia bolezni. Paris, 1952; Ostav’ nadezhdu navsegda (novel). New York, 1954; “God zhizni,” Vozrozhdenie 63—8 (1957); Desia. Paris, 1961; Odinochestvo. Washington DC, 1965; “Na beregakh Nevy,” Novyi zhurnal (New Review) (1962—4) and Washington DC, 1967; Zlataia tsep’: stikhi. Paris, 1975; Portret v rifmovannoi rame: stikhi. Paris, 1976; “Na beregakh Seny,” Russkaia mysl'(Russian Thought)' (1978—81) and Paris, 1983
Writings: E. R. Dashkova: Literaturnye sochineniia, ed. G. N. Moiseeva. Moscow, 1990
Writings: Emiliia, ili pechal'nye sledstviia bezrassudnoi liubvi. Moscow, 1806; Milena, ili redkii primer velikodushiia. St. Petersburg, 1811; and Al'fons i Florestina, ili shchastlivyi oborot. Moscow, 1807
Writings: Etincelles et cendres. Moscow, 1842; Pensèes et soucis, suivies de La Sylphide-pöete. Moscow, 1843; Epines et lauriers, suivis du “Juif errant,” de “La nonne sanglante” et de quelques essais de vers russes. Moscow, 1845; Journal d'une solitaire. Moscow, 1853; Posledniaia pesn’ lebedia. Russkie i frantsuzskiia stikhotvoreniia. St. Petersburg, 1864
Writings: Eto bylo so mnoi. Baku, 1957; Vernost’. Moscow, 1958; Ne prosto — liubov’. Moscow, 1963; Iz pervykh ust. Moscow, 1966; Vinogradnyi svet. Moscow, 1978; Dozhdi i zerkala. Paris, 1983; Stikhotvoreniia: Na opushke sna. Ann Arbor, mi, 1984; Vozdushnyi plast. Moscow, 1990; Stikhotvoreniia. Moscow, 1991; Posle vsego. St. Petersburg, 1994; Odinokii dar. Moscow, Paris and New York, 1995; Iz pervykh ust. Moscow, 1996; Veter pokoia. St. Petersburg, 1998; Muzyka “Poemy bez geroia” Anny Akhmatovoi. Moscow, 1991, revised as Shkatulka s troinym dnom. Kaliningrad, 1995 (literary criticism); Izbrannoe (Selections)rannoe. Rostov-na-Donu, 1999; Muzyka i bereg. St. Petersburg, 2000
Writings: Eto bylo v Koree, Harbin, 1935; Po stranam rasseianiia. New York, 1978
Writings: Gnev Dionisa. St. Petersburg, 1910; 10th edn, 1916; Riga, 1930; Bronzovaia dver’. St. Petersburg, 1911; Bor'ba mikrobov. St. Petersburg, 1913; Belaia kolonnada. St. Petersburg, 1914; 4th edn, Riga, 1931; Reka vremen. Berlin, 1924—6; poems in Uchenova, V. (ed.), Tsaritsy muz: russkie poetessy XIX-nachala XXvv. Moscow, 1989.; Gnev Dionisa, repr. St. Petersburg, 1994
Writings: Grafinia D***** (1848); Posle obeda v gostiakh, Russkii vestnik (Russian Herald) 8:2 (1858); Iz provintsial'noi gallerei portretov, Russkii vestnik (Russian Herald) 5 (1859) and in Uchenova, V. (ed.), Dacha na Petergofskoi doroge. Moscow, 1986.; “Stepnoi tsvetok na mogilu Pushkina: Kriticheskii etiud,” 1859; “Gaika,” Russkoe slovo 4 (1860); Starina: Semeinaia pamiat’, 1861; Kholera: Kamennye baby, 1861; “S khutora. Pis'mo o sviatykh gorakh,” 1864; Sumerechnye rasskazy. Staroe vospominanie tetushki, 1885
Writings: I byl i nebylitsy o Bloke i o sebe. Bremen, 1979
Writings: Ia khochu krasotu podarit’. Moscow, 1992 (posthumously)
Writings: Ili: Stikhi i teksty. Moscow, 1991; Referendum. Moscow, 1991; Neskol'ko slov. France, 1991; Pravo na oshibku. 1995; Interpretatsiia momenta: stikhi i teksty. Moscow, 1996; Neposredstvennaia zhizn’. Moscow, 1997; O glavnom. Moscow, 1998; Rasskazy o liubvi i smerti: Zhitie Lysogo i Vermisheli (prose). Moscow, 1999
Writings: Inei. Harbin, 1921
Writings: Inymi glazami: Ocherki shangkhaiskoi zhizni. Shanghai, 1945; Vozvrashchenie. Moscow, 1957—66; Vnimanie opasnost’ Moscow, 1960; Ne nado ovatsi Moscow, 1964; Chto-to tut ne kleitsia. Moscow, 1968; Tut vse napisano. Moscow, 1971; Svetiashchiesia tablo. Moscow, 1974; Sud’ by. Moscow, 1980; Dorogi. Moscow, 1983; Dorogi i sud’ by. Moscow, 1985, 1988, 1991; Belogorskaia krepost’. Moscow, 1989
Writings: Iz-za vlasti. Shanghai, 1932; Kreshchenskii vecherok. Shanghai, 1932; Sem'ia Kuznetsovykh. Shanghai, 1936; Zhenshchina iz bara. Shanghai, undated, 1930s; V pautine Shanghaia. Shanghai, 1937
Writings: Izbrannoe (Selections). Tel-Aviv, 1985
Writings: Izmena. Harbin, 1935; Pushkin i Soban'skaia. Harbin, 1936; Raba Afrodity. Harbin, 1936; Pobezhdennaia. Harbin, 1937; Pesni zemli. Harbin, 1938; Ty. Harbin, 1942
Writings: Katushka: povesti. Moscow, 1978; Perepolnennye dni: rasskazy i povesti. Moscow, 1982; Osvobodite slona. Moscow, 1985; Leto na kryshe. Moscow, 1987; Otkrytyi final. Moscow, 1989; “Poslezavtra v San-Frantsisko,” Daugava 9 (1989); V nachale bylo detstvo. Moscow. 1990; From Bauhaus to Terezin: Friedl Dicker-Brandeis and Her Pupils. Jerusalem, 1990; Gde sidit fazan; Stuchit-gremit; Obsession; NachaJerusalem, 1993; Smekh na ruinakh. Roman, Znamia 3—4 (1995); Friedl Dicker-Brandeis; ein Leben für Kunst und Lehre: Wien, Weimar, Prag, Hronov, Theresienstadt, Auschwitz. Vienna, 2000
Writings: Kavalerist-devitsa. 1836; God zhizni v Peterburge ili Nevygody tret'ego poseshcheniia. 1838; “Nekotorye cherty iz detskikh let,” Literaturnoe pribavlenie k “Russkomu invalidu,” 41, 44 (1838); Zapiski Aleksandrova (Durovoi). Dobavlenie k “Devitse-kavalerist”. Moscow, 1839; Gudishki, 4 vols. St. Petersburg, 1839; Povesti i rasskazy, 4 vols. St. Petersburg, 1839; Igra sud'by, ili protivozakonnaia liubov’. 1839; Pavil'on. 1839; Iarchuk, sobaka-dukhovidets. 1840; Klad. St. Petersburg, 1840; Nurmeka. 1840. Ugol. St. Petersburg, 1840. For more bibliographical information, see Mary Zirin's translation of Durova's The Cavalry Maiden
Writings: Kliuchi. Harbin, 1926; Dzhebel’-Kebir. Harbin, 1937; Komu v Kharbine zhit’ khorosho. Harbin, 1940; Pereletnye ptitsy. San Francisco, 1982; Kaleidoskop zhizni. Paris, 1990
Writings: Kogda zhe poidet sneg? … Tashkent, 1980; Zavtra, kak obychno. Plovdiv, 1985; Otvorite okno. Tashkent, 1987; Dvoinaia familiia. Moscow, 1990; “Doch’ Bukhary,” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 1 (1993); “Vo vratakh Tvoikh,” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 5 (1993); Odin intelligent uselsia na doroge. Jerusalem, 1994; “Itak, prodolzhaem!‥ Monolog naturshchitsy,” Dialog 1 (Moscow, 1996); Kamera naezzhaet. Moscow, 1996; “‘Vot idet Messiia!‥ ’”Druzhba narodov (Peoples' Friendship) 9—10 (1996); Angel konvoinyi. Moscow, 1997; Uroki muzyki. Moscow, 1998
Writings: Kol'tsa. Moscow, 1904; “Net ! Liricheskie tseny,” Fakely 1 (1906); “Pevuchii osel’.” Tsvetnik Or. St. Petersburg, 1907; Tridtsat’-tri uroda. St. Petersburg, 1907; Tragicheskii zverinets. St. Petersburg, 1907; Plamenniki. Incomplete and unpublished; Velikii kolokol. Incomplete and unpublished
Writings: Kolymskoe zoloto. Moscow, 1936; Byli Aldana. Moscow, 1937; Tovarishch Anna. Moscow, 1946; Ivan Ivanovich. Moscow, 1950; Druzhba. Moscow, 1954; Derzanie. Moscow, 1958; Dar zemli. Moscow, 1958; Na Ural-reke. Moscow, 1971
Writings: Krov’ nerozhdennykh, 1996; Prodazhnye tvari, 1996; Legkie shagi bezumiia, 1997; Nikto ne zaplachet, 1997; Mesto pod solntsem, 1997; Obraz vraga, 1998; Zolotoi pesok, 1998; Kriminal'nye voiny RUOP, 1999; Efirnoe vremia, 1999. A list of her numerous works may be accessed through http://www.eksmo.ru
Writings: Krutoi marshrut: Khronika vremen kul'ta lichnosti, 2 vols. Milan, 1967, 1979; Frankfurt/Main, 1967; New York, 1985; Riga, 1989; Moscow, 1990
Writings: Kryl'ia vzmakhnuvshie. Harbin, 1920
Writings: Kupol. Gorky, 1990; poems in Ogonek 10 (1990), 16; Druzhba narodov (Peoples' Friendship) 3 (1992), 35—8; Druzhba narodov (Peoples' Friendship) 3 (1995) 19—24; Druzhba narodov (Peoples' Friendship) 9 (1996), 3—8; Iunost’, Volga, Novyi mir (NewWorld), Neva; Sotvorenie mira. Nizhnii Novgorod, 1997
Writings: Lana. Harbin, 1939
Writings: Lebedinaia karusel’: Stikhi 1929—1934. Berlin, 1935; “Chuzhie deti,” Sovremennye zapiski 68 (1939); “Letnaia koloniia,” Kovcheg 2 (1942); “Asia: Glava iz Romana Zagrzhevskii,” Opyty 1 (1953) “Iz perepiski I. A. i V. N. Buninykh s A. Golovinoi (1942—1953),” in I. A. Bunin i russkaia literatura XX v. Moscow, 1995
Writings: Lebedinaia pesnia. Moscow, 1981; Tsvetnye reshetki. Moscow, 1982; Novyi Panteon. Moscow, 1983; Natiurmort s prevrashcheniiami. Moscow, 1985; Nol’ nol’. Moscow, 1987, includes selections from first four books; Ispoved’ shpiona. Moscow, 1988; Prostranstvo. Moscow, 1989; Shcherbina. Moscow, 1991; Zhizn’ bez: Stikhi. Moscow, 1997
Writings: Lesnaia istoriia. Moscow, 1965; Zhenshchiny. Moscow. 1967; Tretii semestr. Moscow, 1973; Vid s balkona. Moscow, 1981; Vse prokhodit. Moscow, 1990; Sladkaia zhenshchina. Moscow, 1994
Writings: Lesnaia svirel’. 1907
Writings: Liubov'po ob'iavleniiu. Shanghai, 1930s; Model’ No. 115. Shanghai, 1930s; Zhenshchina, o kotoroi ne govoriat. Shanghai, 1930s
Writings: Mater dolorosa. Petrograd, 1921, 2nd edn, Berlin-Riga, 1922; Baraban strogogo gospodina. Berlin, 1922; Chas vechernii. Petrograd, 1922; Iav’. Moscow, 1923; Krov’-ruda. Petrograd and Berlin, 1922, 2nd edn, Moscow, 1925; Zemnye remesla. Moscow, 1925; Sama po sebe. Leningrad, 1930; Piatnadtsat’ i odin. Moscow, 1931; Stikhi. London, 1979
Writings: Miniatury. Khar'kov, 1906; Nevozmozhnoe. Moscow, 1912; Idushchie mimo. Moscow, 1914; 2nd edn., Moscow, 1917; Lampady nezazhennye. Petrograd and Moscow, 1915; “Tebe edinomu sogreshila,” in My pomnim Pol'shu. Petrograd, 1915; Zhenshchina na kreste. Moscow, 1916; 2nd edn, Moscow, 1916; 3rd edn, Moscow, 1918
Writings: Moi gorod. Berlin, 1928; Tishina. Berlin, 1935; with Mirra Borodina, Zavety. Brussels, 1939; with Mikhail Gorlin, Izbrannoe (Selections)rannye stikhotvoreniia. Paris, 1959; Ètudes littèraires et historiques par M. Gorlin et R. Blokh-Gorlin. Paris, 1957
Writings: Moi sad. Moscow, 1906; “Odno i to zhe,” Severnye tsvety na 1902. Moscow, 1902; “Osvobozhdenie (iz zhenskikh sonetov),” Severnye tsvety 3 (1903); as Nikita Bobrinskii, “Pafos zhizni,” Novyi put’, 3 (1904); poems in Almanakh Grif. Moscow, 1914; P'esy. Moscow, 1958
Writings: My i nashi deti.Harbin, 1934; Ot vosemnadtsati do soroka. Tianjin, 1939; Povest’ ob odnoi materi. Tianjin, 1939; Puti izgnaniia (memoirs). Tenafly, NJ, 1987 (posthumously)
Writings: Na Taiti. Leningrad, 1925; Zemlianichka. Moscow, 1926; Zashchitnyi tsvet. Moscow, 1928; Six entre autres: nouvelles. Lausanne, 1945; Maiakovski, poete russe. Paris, 1945; L’ècrivain et le livre. Paris, 1948; Oeuvre romanesques croisèes. Paris, 1964
Writings: Na zolotom kryl'tse sideli. Moscow, 1987; Liubish’ ne liubish’. Moscow, 1997; Sestry (with Natal'ia Tolstaia). Moscow, 1998; Reka Okkervil: rasskazy. Moscow, 1999; Kys’: roman. Moscow, 2000
Writings: Nevozvratnoe. Harbin, 1932; Nora. China, date not known; Mechty i zhizn’. China, date not known; Sud'ba. Harbin, 1934; repr. San Francisco, 1984
Writings: Novye liudi: Rasskazy, pervaia kniga. St. Petersburg, 1896; Zerkala: Vtoraia kniga rasskazov. St. Petersburg, 1898; Pobediteli. St. Petersburg, 1898; Sviataia krov’. P'esa. St. Petersburg, 1901; Tret'ia kniga rasskazov. St. Petersburg, 1902; Sobranie stikhov: 1889—1903. Moscow, 1904; Alyi mech: Rasskazy, chetvertaia kniga. St. Petersburg, 1906; with D. Merezhkovskii and D. Filosofov, Le Tsar et la Rèvolution. Paris, 1907; Chernoe po belomu: Piataia kniga rasskazov. St. Petersburg, 1908; as Anton Krainii, Literaturnyi dnevnik 1899—1907. St. Petersburg, 1908; Sobranie stikhov: Kniga vtoraia, 1903—1909. Moscow, 1910; Chertova kukla. Moscow, 1911; Lunnye murav'i. Shestaia kniga rasskazov. Moscow, 1912; Roman-Tsarevich. Moscow, 1913; Kak my voinam pisali i chto oni nam otvechali. Kniga podarok. Moscow, 1915; Zelenoe kol'tso. P'esa. Petrograd, 1916; Poslednie stikhi, 1914—1918. St. Petersburg, 1918; Pokhodnye pesni. Warsaw, 1920; Nebesnoe slovo. Rasskazy, 1897—1900. Paris, 1921; Stikhi: Dnevnik 1911—1921. Berlin, 1922; Zhivye litsa. Prague, 1925; Sinnaia kniga. Peterburgskii dnevnik, 1914—18. Belgrade, 1929; Siianiia. Paris, 1938; ed. with Dmitrii Merezhkovskii, Literaturnyi smotr: svobodnyi. Paris, 1939; Dmitrii Merezhkovskii. Paris, 1951
Writings: O tom, chego ne bylo. Moscow, 1969. Reissued Moscow, 1996; Kogda stalo nemnozhko teplee. Moscow, 1972; Zanuda. Tallin, 1977; Letaiushchie kacheli. Moscow, 1978. Reissued Tallin, 1982 and Moscow, 1996; Nichego osobennogo. Moscow, 1983. Reissued Moscow, 1997; “Mezhdu nebom i zemlei,” 1985; “Dlinnyi den’,” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 2 (1986); Letaiushchie kacheli. Nichego osobennogo. Moscow, 1987; “Dva Rasskaza (‘Piat’ figur na postamente’ and ‘Pasha i Pavlusha’),” Oktiab’ 9 (1987); “Pervaia popytka,” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 1 (1987); “Kirka i ofitser,” Ogonek 10 (March 1991); “Kak ia ob”iavil voinu iaponii,” Krokodil 12 (April 1991); Skazat’ — ne skazat’. Moscow, 1991; Staraia sobaka. Moscow, 1991; “Ia est’. Ty est’. On est’. Rasskaz,” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 9 (1991); Dzhentl'meny udachi. Moscow, 1993; Korrida. Moscow, 1993. Reissued Moscow, 1995; Den’ bez vran'ia. Moscow, 1994; Kheppi end. Moscow, 1995; “Lavina. Povest’,” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 10 (1995); Lavina. Moscow, 1996; Na cherta nam chuzhie: povesti i rasskazy. Moscow, 1995; Shla sobaka po roialiu, 2 vols. Moscow, 1995; Vmesto menia. Moscow, 1995; 1996; Loshadi s kryl'iami. Moscow, 1996; Ne sotvori. Moscow, 1996; Rimskie kanikuly. Moscow, 1996; “Sistema sobak,” Oktiabr’ 3 (1996); Koshka na doroge. Moscow, 1997; Mezhdu nebom i zemlei. Moscow, 1997; Mozhno i nel'zia. Moscow, 1997; Nakhal. Moscow, 1997; Odin kubik nadezhdy: povesti, rasskazy. Moscow, 1997; Sentimental'noe puteshestvie. Moscow, 1997; Skazhi mne chto-nibud’ —: povesti i rasskazy. Moscow, 1997; Telokhranitel’: (rasskazy). Moscow, 1997; Kino i vokrug. Moscow, 1998; Odin iz nas. Moscow, 1998; Samyi schastlivyi den’. Moscow, 1998; Nu i pust’. Moscow, 1998; Etot luchshii iz mirov. Moscow, 1999; Gladkoe lichiko. Moscow, 1999; Lilovyi kostium. Moscow, 1999; Perelom. Moscow, 1999; Rozovye rozy. Moscow, 1999; Banketnyi zal. Moscow, 1999; Zvezda v tumane. Moscow, 1999; Malo li chto byvaet. Moscow, 1999; Vse normal'no, vse khorosho. Moscow, 2000
Writings: Ocherki bolshogo sveta. St. Petersburg, 1839; Stikhotvoreniia. St. Petersburg, 1841; Stikhotvoreniia, 2 vols. St. Petersburg, 1856—8; U pristani. Roman v pismakh, 4 vols. St. Petersburg, 1857; Dnevnik devushki. St. Petersburg, 1866; Sochineniia (Works), 2 vols. St. Petersburg, 1890; Sobranie sochinenii (Collected works). St. Petersburg, 1910. Poems, in Poety 1840—1850-kh godov; Bannikov,N. V. (ed.), Russkie poetessy XIX veka. Moscow, 1979.; Tsaritsy muz; Moskovskaia muza, ed. G. D. Klimova
Writings: Ognevitsa: stikhotvoreniia i poemy. Moscow, 1969; Lebeda, 1970; Den’ poezii Rossii, comp. with M. P. Shevchenko. Moscow, 1972; Al'bion i taina vremeni: rasskazy. Moscow, 1978; 2nd edn, Moscow, 1983; Listva: kniga stikhov. Moscow, 1980; Izbrannoe (Selections)rannoe: stikhotvoreniia i poemy. Moscow, 1981; Derzost’: sbornik stikhov. Moscow, 1984; Kniga ob ottse: roman-vospominanie. Moscow, 1984; Moskvorech'e: stikhotvroreniia i poemy. Moscow, 1985; O sokrovennom: razgovor s chitatelem. Moscow, 1987; Oblako ognia. Moscow, 1988; Izbrannoe (Selections)rannye proizvedeniia v dvukh tomakh. Moscow, 1989; “Zhenshchina. Zhizn’. Literatura,” Literaturnaia gazeta (Literary Gazette) (December 20, 1989); Kremlevskie zheny: fakty, vospominaniia, dokumenty, slukhi, legendy i vzgliad avtora. Moscow, 1992; 2nd edn, 1998; Deti Kremlia. Moscow, 1996; as Vasilii Staroi. P'er i Natasha: prodolzhenie romana L. N. Tolstogo “Voina i mir.” Moscow, 1996; “Moe kredo — ne feminizm a garmoniia mezhdu muzhchinoi i zhenshchinoi” (interview), Voin Rossii 3 (1999); Zhena i Muza: taina Aleksandra Pushkina: fakty, daty, dokumenty, vospominaniia, pis'ma, slukhi, legendy, stikhi i vzgliad avtora. Moscow, 1999
Writings: Ogon’ neugasimyi. Shanghai, 1937; Rodnoi strane. Shanghai, 1942
Writings: Okno: rasskazy. Leningrad, 1981; “Treugol'nik Barsukova,” Glagol 3 (1981); “Polina,” Neva 1 (1984); Tsvetnye otkrytki: rasskazy i povesti. Leningrad, 1986; “Kurzal,” Zvezda 11 (1986); “Zhara na severe. Povest,” Zvezda 4 (1988); “Solntse za steklom,” Zvezda 4 (1989); Kurzal. Povesti. Leningrad, 1990; “Sennaia ploshchad’,” Zvezda 7 (1991), (reissue of “Treugol'nik Barsukova”). Published separately, St. Petersburg, 1992; Isk. Samara, 1998; (ms. 1991); “Sindrom ‘P.’ Povest’,” Zvezda 11 (1994); “Piramida Tsukermana,” Zvezda 10 (1995); “V-4-52-21,” Zvezda 10 (1997); “Vozvrashchenie,” Zvezda 4 (1998); “Tot svet,” Zvezda 2, 3 (1999); Tot svet. Moscow, 2000
Writings: Opyty v stikhakh piatnadtsatiletnei devitsy Elisavety Shakhovoi. St. Petersburg, 1837; Stikhotvoreniia. St. Petersburg, 1839; Stikhotvoreniia. St. Petersburg, 1840; Povesti v stikhakh. St. Petersburg, 1842; Mirianka i otshel'nitsa. St. Petersburg, 1849; “Pamiatnye zapiski o zhizni igumenii Marii, osnovatel'nitsy Spaso-borodinskogo obshchezhitel'nogo monastyria,” Strannik 5—6 (1865); Iudif. Moscow, 1877; Sochineniia v stikhakh, 3 vols., ed. N. N. Shakhov. St. Petersburg, 1911. Poems in Bannikov,N. V. (ed.), Russkie poetessy XIX veka. Moscow, 1979.; Uchenova, V. (ed.), Tsaritsy muz: russkie poetessy XIX-nachala XXvv. Moscow, 1989.
Writings: Ostyvshie nochi. Shanghai, 1941
Writings: Osvobodilas’ ! Moscow, 1898; Vavochka. Moscow, 1898; Sny zhizni. Moscow, 1899; Pervye lastochki. Moscow, 1900; Ch'ia vina. Moscow, 1900; “Avtobiografiia,” in Sbornik na pomoshch’ uchashchimsia zhenshchinam. Moscow, 1901, 84—91; Po-novomu: roman uchitel'nitsy. Moscow, 1902; Istoriia odnoi zhizni. Moscow, 1903; Zlaia rosa. Moscow, 1904; Schast'e: novye rasskazy. Moscow, 1905; Dukh vremeni. Moscow, 1907; Prestuplenie Marii Ivanovnoi, i drugie rasskazy i ocherki iz zhizni odinokikh, 3rd edn, Moscow, 1908; Moemu chitateliu, I: Detstvo. Gody ucheniia. Moscow, 1908; ii: Iunost’, Grezy. Moscow, 1911; Kliuchi schast'ia, 6 vols. Moscow, 1909—13; Igo liubvi, Parts 1 and 2. Moscow, 1914—16; Moscow, 1992, 1993; Part 3, 1920, unpublished, in Russian archives, Rossiiskii gosudarstvennyi arkhiv literatury i iskusstva (Russian State Archive of Literature and Art), fond 1042, for a new, abridged edn, see Kliuchi schast'ia. Kiev, 1995; for recent fuller edns, see Kliuchi schast'ia. Kiev, 1995; Igo liubvi. Kiev, 1995
Writings: Otpechatki mgnovenii. Novosibirsk, 1990
Writings: PANV und andere Zeichenchimare. W. Berlin, 1988; Transfurism. Leipzig, 1989; Protsess nad shotlandstem traktion. Trento, 1989; with Sergei Sigei, Transponance Transfurismus, oder kaaba der abstraktion. Seigen, 1989; with Sergei Sigei, Zaum. Vienna, 1990
Writings: Pechal'noe vino. Paris, 1914; Gor'kaia uslada. Moscow, 1917; Mesto pod solntsem. Khar'kov, 1928; Amerika v Parizhe. Khar'kov, 1928; Soiuz materei. Komediia. Moscow, 1938; Pulkovskii meridian. Moscow, 1942; Pochti tri goda. Leningradskii dnevnik. Moscow, 1944; Kak ia byla malen'kaia. Moscow, 1954; Vdokhnovenie i masterstvo. Moscow, 1957; Aprel’. Stikhi o Lenine. Moscow, 1960; Stranitsy dnei perebiraia. Iz dnevnikov i zapisnykh knizhek. Moscow, 1967
Writings: Pervye ispytaniia. Moscow, 1955; first published in Novyi mir (NewWorld) (1954); Razgovor o shchast'e: ocherki i rasskazy. Moscow, 1959; Matvei i Shurka: rasskazy. Moscow, 1962; Ia ishchu tebia, cheloveka: rasskazy i povest’. Moscow, 1963; Slovo o zerne gorchichnom. Moscow, 1965, 1971; Rasskazy. Moscow, 1966; Zachem spilili kashtany? Moscow, 1967; Zapiski o pogranichnikakh. Moscow, 1969; K sebe vozvrashchaius’ izdaleka: ocherki. Moscow, 1971; “Teatral'naia aktrisa,” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 10 (1971); “Tiapkin i Lesha: povest’,” Znamia 12 (1971); Moscow, 1977; Povest’ o zhenshchine: povesti, rasskazy, ocherki. Moscow, 1973; Dal'naia poezdka: rasskazy. Moscow, 1975; Sozvezdie bliznetsov: povesti i rasskazy. Moscow, 1980, 1984; Dorogi Rossii: vstrechi na dorogakh Rossii s zhivshimi nedavno i nyne zhivushchimi. Moscow, 1981; Izbrannoe (Selections)rannoe: rasskazy i povesti. Moscow, 1983; “Esli budem zhit’,” Oktiabr’ 6 (1983); Sto zhiznei moikh: roman, povest’. Moscow, 1983; “Poka zhivu-nadeius’,” Oktiabr’ 10 (1986) and 11 (1987); Poka zhivu-nadeius’: roman, rasskazy, publitsistika. Moscow, 1987, 1989; Kamazonki na rabote i doma (Ocherki o zhenshchinakh Naberezhnykh Chelnov). Moscow, (n.d.); “Opravdanie zhizni. Sub”ektivnaia epopeia,” Moskva 10—12 (1995)
Writings: Pervye vstrechi. Moscow, 1909; Orientalia. Moscow, 1913; Mess-mend, ili Ianki v Petrograde. Leningrad, 1927; Kik. Leningrad, 1929; Gidro-tsentral’. Leningrad, 1931; Sobranie sochinenii (Collected works), 5 vols. Moscow, 1971—5; Chelovek i vremia. Moscow, 1980. For more complete listing, see Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II
Writings: Pesni o Kolokole F. Shillera. Moscow, 1832; Zhizn’ Presviatoi devy Bogoroditsy iz knig Chet'i-Minei. Moscow, 1840; 16th edn, Moscow, 1915; Stikhotvoreniia Shillera. Zum Dichters 100 Jahrigem Geburtsfest. St. Petersburg, 1859
Writings: Pesni sibiriachki. Harbin, 1919
Writings: Piiticheskie opyty Elisavety Kul'man. St. Petersburg, 1833; Sammtliche Dichtungen, 4 vols. St. Petersburg, 1835; Leipzig, 1844, 1884; Frankfurt, 1851, 1853, 1857; Polnoe sobranie russkikh, nemetskikh i italiianskikh stikhotvorenii. Piiticheskie opyty Elisavety Kul'man. St. Petersburg, 1839; 2nd edn, 1841; Skazki, 3 vols. St. Petersburg, 1839; Dichtungen von Elisabeth Kulman. Heidelberg, 1875. Poems in Bannikov,N. V. (ed.), Russkie poetessy XIX veka. Moscow, 1979.; Uchenova, V. (ed.), Tsaritsy muz: russkie poetessy XIX-nachala XXvv. Moscow, 1989.
Writings: Pis'ma iz Moskvy v Kazan. Kazan, 1833; Poezdka iz Kazani v Cheboksary. Kazan, 1834; Stikhotvoreniia. Kazan, 1834; Osnovanie goroda Kazani: Povest’ v stikhakh vziataia iz tatarskikh predanii. Kazan, 1836; Ona pokhudela. Kazan, 1837; with P. A. Zhmakin, Tsarevna Nesmeiana. Kazan, 1838; “Chernaia koza,” Biblioteka dlia chteniia (Library for Reading) 28 (1838); Zapiski o chuvashakh i cheremisakh Kazanskoi gubernii. Kazan, 1840; Kniazhna Khabiba. Kazan, 1841
Writings: Po zemnym lugam. Shanghai, 1940
Writings: Pod fonarem. Moscow, 1966; Seryozha u okna. Moscow, 1976; An'ia i Man'ia. Moscow, 1978; Vdovii parokhod. Paris, 1983, Moscow, 1998; Kafedra. Moscow, 1983; Na ispytaniiakh. Moscow, 1990; Svezho predanie. Tenafly, nj, 1995; Moscow, 1998; Damskii master. Moscow, 1998
Writings: Poseshcheniia: Stikhi 1929—1936. Prague, 1936; Strofy. Warsaw, 1938
Writings: Poslednie i pervye. Paris, 1930; Povelitel'nitsa. Berlin, 1932; Chaikovskii: istoriia odinokoi zhizni. Berlin, 1936; Bez zakata. Paris, 1938; Borodin. Berlin, 1938; Alexandre Blok et son temps. Paris, 1948; Oblegchenie uchasti. Paris, 1949; “Mys bur” Novyi zhurnal (New Review), 24—7 (1950—1); Vladislav Khodasevich, Sobranie stikhov, 1913—1939. Munich, 1960; repr. New Haven, 1961; Kursiv moi. Novyi zhurnal (New Review) (1967), and Munich, 1972; 2nd edn, New York, 1983; Zinaida Gippius, Pis'ma k Berberovoi i Khodasevichu. Ann Arbor, 1978; Zheleznaia zhenshchina. New York, 1981; Vladislav Khodasevich, Izbrannoe (Selections)rannaia proza. New York, 1982; Stikhi, 1921—1983. New York, 1984; Liudi i lozhi. New York, 1986; Neizvestnaia Berberova: roman, stikhi, stat'i. St. Petersburg, 1998; Borodin. Mys bur. Povelitel'nitsa. Moscow, 1998; Aleksandr Blok i ego vremeni. Moscow, 1999
Writings: Povesti i rasskazy, 2 vols. St. Petersburg, 1899; Povesti i rasskazy, 3 vols. St. Petersburg, 1900—03; Rasskazy. St. Petersburg, 1913; “Iz pisem N. K. Mikhailovskogo. Komentarii E. L.,” Russkoe bogatstvo (RussianWealth) 1 (1914), 370—98; Ocherki i rasskazy. Petrograd, 1915; “Krasivaia zhizn’ (Iz vospominanii ob A. P. Filosofovoi),” in Sbornik pamiati Anny Pavlovny Filosofovoi, vol. II. Petrograd, 1915, 26—34; I. S. Turgenev: Obshchedostupnaia biografiia i kharakteristika k 100-letniiu so dnia rozhdeniia. Petrograd, 1918; “Slepye i glukhie. Vospominaniia o V. Korolenko,” in V. G. Korolenko. Zhizn’ i tvorchestvo. Sbornik statei. Petrograd, 1922; “O F. M. Dostoevskom: Iz vospominanii,” Zven'ia 1, Moscow and Leningrad, 1932, 459—77; “Pro Gleba Ivanovicha,” Zven'ia 1, Moscow and Leningrad, 1935, 682–731
Writings: Povesti i rasskazy. St. Petersburg, 1889; Ee siiatel'stvo. St. Petersburg, 1890; 3rd edn, 1905; Avdot'iny dochki. St. Petersburg, 1901, and in Uchenova, Uchenova, V. (ed.), Tol'ko chas. Moscow, 1988.. Moscow, 1988. Invalidy i novobrantsy. St. Petersburg, 1901; Drug detstva. St. Petersburg, 1903; “V burnie gody,” Russkaia mysl'(Russian Thought)' 1—8 (1906) and St. Petersburg, 1907; 2nd edn, 1910; “Zhenskii s” ezd,” Russkie vedomosti 295 (1908); Sobranie sochinenii (Collected works), 10 vols. St. Petersburg, 1910—11; “Avtobiografiia” in F. Fidler, Pervye literaturnye shagi. Moscow, 1911; “Zhenskoe bespravie,” Birzhevye vedomosti, June 15, 1916
Writings: Pravila poezii. Sokrashchennyi perevod Abbata Bate s prisovokupleniem Rossiiskago stopolozheniia v pol'zu devits. Moscow, 1808; Neopytnaia muza, 2 vols. St. Petersburg, 1809—12; Padenie Faetona. St. Petersburg, 1811; Sel'skie vechera. St. Petersburg, 1811; Spasenie Fiv. Geroicheskaia povest’. St. Petersburg, 1811; Sobranie stikhotvorenii, 3 vols. St. Petersburg, 1819—21; Nravstvennye i filosoficheskie besedy Kh. Blera. Moscow, 1829;
Writings: Predlagaemye obstoiatel'stva. Moscow, 1988. Title story also included in Chistenkaia zhizn’, comp. A. Shavkuta; Poslannik. Moscow, 1990; “Ploshchad’,” “Sel'va,” and “Zhizn’ dereva,” in Ne pomniashchaia zla, comp. L. Vaneeva; “Chistaia zona,” Znamia 1 (1990) also in Vasilenko, Svetlana (comp.), Novye amazonki. Moscow, 1991.; “Bednoe serdtse Mani,” Literaturnaia gazeta (Literary Gazette) (September 5, 1990); “Mama,” Literaturnoe obozrenie (Literary Review) 11 (1990); Chistaia zona. Moscow, 1991; “Rasskazy,” Znamia 5 (1993) (cycle of stories including “Penal,” “Son,” and “Zhizel’”); “Sneg idet tikho-tikho.” “Perekhod.” Rasskazy, Znamia, 12 (1994); “Tikhaia komnata. Rasskaz,” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 3 (1995); “Prokhozhdenie teni,” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 1—2 (1997)
Writings: Pushinki. Harbin, 1927
Writings: Raduga kazhdyi den’: rasskazy. Perm, 1987; “Istoriia ozera Veselogo” and “Stariki,” in Ne pomniashchaia zla; “Kazachii sud,” in Chisten'kaia zhizn’. “Novella,” in Eros, syn Afrodity, comp. S. Markov. Moscow, 1991; “Protokol,” “Novyi Podkolesin,” “Reshenie Valeriia,” “Gamburgskii schet,” and “Chto-to khoroshee,” in Abstinentki. Moscow, 1991; “Pokaiannye dni, ili V ozhidanii kontsa sveta,” in Vasilenko, Svetlana (comp.), Novye amazonki. Moscow, 1991.; “Liubov'v rezinovykh perchatkakh,” in Chego khochet zhenshchina: sbornik zhenskikh rasskazov; with Viacheslav Buker, “Uchitel’ ivrita,” Zvezda 5 (1994); with Viacheslav Buker, “Roman Vospitaniia,” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 8—9 (1995); “Muzhchiny v moei zhizni,” Ural'skaia nov’ 1—2 (1996); Rodnye liudi: rasskazy. Perm, 1996; “Vsem postradavshim ot AO ‘MMM’,” Piatii ugol (Cheliabinsk), (December 25, 1996); Vsia Perm’. Perm, 1996; “Chetyre rasskaza,” Den’ i noch’ 4 (1997). Includes, “Iarostnye kartezhniki,” “Liubov’ deputata,” “Zolotoi kliuchik,” and “Diadia”; “Lav stori,” Zvezda 11 (1998); Liubov’ v rezinovykh perchatkakh. St. Petersburg, 1999. Dom so vsemi neudobstvami: povesti. Moscow, 2000
Writings: Rainia. Moscow, 1908; Lada. Moscow, 1912; Rus’: Tret'ia kniga stikhov. Moscow, 1915; Elena Deeva. Moscow, 1916; Golovoi kover. Unpublished, 1916; Sviataia bludnitsa. Unpublished, c. 1917; Dva Ali. Unpublished, 1926; Rogozhskaia Charovnitsa. Unpublished, 1928; Golos nezrimogo. Sofia, Bulgaria, 1934
Writings: Rasskazy. Moscow, 1908; Gde-to tam. Petrograd, 1918; Stekliannaia stena: Rasskazy. Petrograd, 1918, 2nd edn, Berlin, 1921; “V gorakh,” Spolokhi 1 (1921); “Prosti-proshchai,” in Zhar-Ptitsa (1921); Kartochnye domiki sovetskogo stroitel'stva. Berlin, 1921; Voda ne idet: Povest’. Berlin, 1922; “Ochen’ prosto: iz peterburgskikh vpechatlenii,” Volia Rossii 19 (1922); “Ivan Petrovich,” in Tsveten’, 1922; Vikhorevy gnezda. Berlin, 1923; “Plonkheir,” Perezvony 4 (1925); “Lenia,” Perezvony 26 (1926); Zheny: Rasskazy. Paris, 1929; Radost’ tikhaia: Putevye zametki. Paris, 1929; “Tania iz Kaira,” Illiustrirovannaia Rossiia 274 (1930); “Modeli,” Illiustrirovannaia Rossiia 282 (1930); “Sud'ia,” Novosel'e 22—3 (1945); “V Savoie,” Novosele 33—4 (1947); Miranda. New York, 1953
Writings: Rasskazy. Moscow, 1905; Rasskazy, vols I—III. St. Petersburg and Moscow, 1910—13; V ozhidanii prigovora. Moscow, 1924, and in Uchenova, V. (ed.), Tol'ko chas. Moscow, 1988. Izbrannoe (Selections)rannye rasskazy. Voronezh, 1949
Writings: Rasskazy. Moscow, 1939; Na lesnoi polose. Moscow, 1950, 1951; Elena. Moscow, 1961; 1963; Vysokii veter. Moscow. 1968
Writings: Rasskazy. Novosibirsk, 1982; Domashnee vospitanie. Rasskazy, povest’. Moscow, 1984; Kazhdyi okhotnik. Roman, Sibirskie ogni 1—3 (1987); Moscow, 1989; “Nezametnaia rabota,” Novoe russkoe slovo 6 (1987); “Zadumyvaias’ nad proshlym,” Literaturnaia Rossiia 27 (July 8, 1987); “Gde sidit fazan?” Literaturnaia gazeta (Literary Gazette) (November 25, 1987); “Krug zabluzhdenii,” Literaturnaia Rossiia 11 (March 13, 1988); Zagadai zhelanie. Moscow, 1990; “Govori, Mariia !” and “Domokhoziaika,” in Chisten'kaia zhizn’, “Govori, Mariia !” also appears in Vasilenko, Svetlana (comp.), Novye amazonki. Moscow, 1991.; Dar Izory. Moscow, 1991 and Voin Rossii 3 (1998); Gorod v kotorom_: roman, povest’, rasskazy. Cheliabinsk, 1991; Ne rodis’, krasivoi. Rostov-on-Don, 1995; “Proisshestvie,” Realist. Literaturnyi al'manakh 1 (1995); Prokhozhdenie teni. Moscow, 1997
Writings: Razgovor o schase. Moscow, 1957; Mys zhelaniia. Moscow, 1961; Schastlivyi zhuk. Moscow, 1969; Loza. Moscow, 1970; Surovoi nit'iu. Moscow, 1974; Malinovaia koshka. Moscow, 1976; Pri svete zhizni. Moscow, 1977; Poprygat’-poigrat’. Moscow, 1978; Tretii glaz. Moscow, 1980; Izbrannoe (Selections). Moscow, 1982; Sinii ogon’. Moscow, 1985; Domik s truboi. Moscow, 1986; Na etom berege vysokom. Moscow, 1987; V logove golosa. Moscow, 1990; Muskul vody. Moscow, 1990; Sobaka byvaet kusachei. Moscow, 1998; Litso: stikhotvoreniia. Moscow, 2000; Takim obrazom: Stikhotvoreniia. St. Petersburg, 2000
Writings: Razgovor s pamiat'iu. Paris, 1935; Solnechnyi proizvol. Paris, 1937; Polden’. Paris, 1939; “Krymskaia mozaika,” Novosel'e 1 (1942); “Potonuvshee zakholust'e,” Novosel'e 2 (1942); “Gnom,” Novosel'e 3 (1942); “Zapisnaia knizhka,” Novosel'e 6 (1942); Berega. Paris, 1953; Vstrecha. Paris, 1958; Vesna v Parizhe. Paris, 1966; Poslednie stikhi. Paris, 1973; Moe detstvo, vols I—II. Paris, 1973; vol. III, 1974
Writings: Rodnye poryvy. Harbin, 1926; Budushchemu vozhdiu. Tianjin, 1928; Put’ izgnannika. Shanghai, 1932; Pro zaitsa, lisu i ezha. Shanghai, 1930s; U samogo sinego moria. Tubabao, 1949; Nasha zhizn’. Tubabao, 1950; Neugasimoe. USA, 1954; Pamiatka. San Francisco, 1960s; Rasskazy i stikhi. San Francisco, 1994
Writings: Sad chudes. Moscow, 1980; Na korable zimy. Moscow, 1986; Smokovnitsa. Tbilisi, 1990; Zdes’. Moscow, 1990; Kliuchi ot mira. Moscow, 1990; Nichego, krome zhizni. Moscow, 1990; Amor fati. St. Petersburg, 1997; “Invalid detstva: povest’,” Iunost’ 2 (1990), 34—61; “Progulki s Siniavskim,” Literaturnaia gazeta (Literary Gazette) 41 (October 9, 1996), 5; Sovremennaia kul'tura i Pravoslavie. Moscow, 1999
Writings: Satu pikkirikkisestra ptinsessasta. Porvoo, 1927; Skazki. Belgrade, 1931; “Chetvertoe izmerenie.” Zhurnal sodruzhestva 4 (1934); Maiatnik. Helsingfors, 1934; Plennyi veter. Tallin, 1938; “O zarubezhnoi russkoi poezii 1937 g.,” Zhurnal sodruzhestva 6 (1938); Burelom. Helsinki, 1947; Vetvi. Paris, 1954
Writings: Sbornik rasskazov, miniatiur i pr. Harbin, 1912; Po puti zhizni. Harbin, before 1921; Pered voinoi. Harbin, 1921
Writings: Sem’ ognei. St. Petersburg, 1910; Sol’ zemli (1910); Iumoristicheskie rasskazy, 2 vols. St. Petersburg, 1910—11; I stalo tak. St. Petersburg, 1912; Vosem’ miniatiur. St. Petersburg, 1913; Dym bez ognia. St. Petersburg, 1914; Karusel’. St. Petersburg, 1914; Miniatiury i monologi, 1915; Nichego podobnogo, 1915; Zhit'e-byt'e, 1916; Nezhivoi zver’. Petersburg, 1916; repr. as Tikhaia zavo’. Paris, 1921; Vchera, 1918; Vostok i drugie rasskazy. Shanghai, 1920; Rasskazy, 2 vols. Kharbin, c. 1921; Tak zhili. Stockholm, 1921; Chernyi iris. Stockholm, 1921; Sbornik Izbrannoe (Selections)rannykh rasskazov. Paris, 1921; Sokrovishche zemli. Berlin, 1921; Stambul i solntse. Berlin, 1921; Rys’. Berlin, 1923; Shamram. Berlin, 1923; Passiflora. Berlin, 1923; Vechernii den’. Prague, 1924; Provorstvo ruk. Moscow and Leningrad, 1926; Gorodok. Paris, 1927; Tango smerti. Moscow and Leningrad, 1927; Parizhskie rasskazy. Moscow, 1927; Kniga iiun’. Belgrade, 1931; Vospominaniia. Paris, 1931; Baba-iaga. Paris, 1932; Avantiurnyi roman. Paris, 1932; P'esy. Paris, 1934; Ved'ma. Berlin, 1936; O nezhnosti. Paris, 1938; Zigzag. Paris, 1939; Vse o liubvi. Paris, 1946; Zemnaia raduga. New York, 1952; Rasskazy. Moscow, 1971
Writings: Sem'ia (Family). Boston, 1940 in English; New York, 1952 in Russian; Deti (Children). Boston, 1942 in English; Frankfurt, 1958 in Russian; Zhizn’ (Life). Washington, 1964–6
Writings: Sharmanka. St. Petersburg, 1909; Osennii son. St. Petersburg, 1912; Nebesnye verbliuzhata. St. Petersburg, 1914; Selected Prose and Poetry, ed. A. Ljunggren and N. A. Nilssen. Stockholm, 1988; Selected Writings from the Archives, ed. A. Ljunggren and N. Gourianova. Stockholm, 1995; Sochineniia. Oakland, CA, 1996
Writings: Skazki bez podskazki. Moscow, 1981; Bessmertnaia liubov’. Moscow, 1988; Pesni dvadtsatogo veka. Moscow, 1988; Tri devushki v golubom. Moscow, 1989; Svoi krug. Moscow, 1990; Lechenie Vasiliia i drugie skazki. Moscow, 1991; Vremia: noch’, Novyi mir (NewWorld) 2 (1992); Po doroge Boga Erosa. Moscow, 1993; Taina doma: povesti i rasskazy. Moscow, 1995; Bal poslednego cheloveka. Moscow, 1996; Sobranie sochinenii (Collected works), 5 vols. Khar'kov, 1996; Nastoiashchie skazki. Moscow, 1997, 1999; Dom devushek: rasskazy i povesti. Moscow, 1998, 1999; Malen'kaia Groznaia, Moscow, 1998; Naidi menia, son. Moscow, 2000; Karamzin derevenskii dnevnik. St. Petersburg, 2000
Writings: Skifskie cherepki. St. Petersburg, 1912; Ruf’. Petrograd, 1916; “Ravnina russkaia,” Sovremennye zapiski 19—20 (1924); “Klim Semenovich Baryn'kin,” Volia Rossii 7—10 (1925); Zhatva dukha (Zhitiia Sviatykh), 2 vols. Paris, 1927; A. S. Khomiakov. Paris, 1929; Dostoevskii i sovremennost’. Paris, 1929; Mirosozertsanie Vladimira Solov'eva. Paris, 1929; Stikhi. Berlin, 1937; Mariia. Stikhotvoreniia, poemy, misterii, vospominaniia ob areste i lagere v Ravensbriuke. Paris, 1947; Stikhi. Paris, 1949
Writings: Skvoreshniki. Moscow, 1974; Snegir’. Moscow, 1980; Zamysel. Moscow, 1987; Smeshannyi les. Moscow, 1993; Oblaka skvoz’ derev'ia. Moscow, 1997; essays and reviews in Druzhba narodov (Peoples' Friendship) 2 (1994), 196—204; Znamia 5 (1996), 221—2; Voprosy literatury (Questions of Literature) (Sept—Oct, 1996), 253—64; Druzhba narodov (Peoples' Friendship) 2 (1995), 165—78; Novyi mir (NewWorld) 11 (1995), 86—92; Druzhba narodov (Peoples' Friendship) 12 (1991), 245—61; Voprosy literatury (Questions of Literature) 1 (1992), 324—48; Druzhba narodov (Peoples' Friendship) 8 (1989), 5—62 and 9 (1989), 51—105; Literaturnoe obozrenie (Literary Review) 3 (1985), 25—8; Novyi mir (NewWorld) 9 (1997), 235—57; Antologiia akmeizma: stikhi, manifesty, stat'i, zametki, memuary, comp. and annotated by T. A. Bek. Moscow, 1997
Writings: Skvoz’ ogon’. Stikhi. Moscow, 1946; Kolkhoz “Traktor”. Gorky, 1948; Zhatva. Moscow, 1951; Povest’ o direktore MTS i glavnom agronome. Moscow, 1954; Bitva v puti. Moscow, 1958; Rasskazy babki Vasilisy pro chudesa. Moscow, 1962; Nash sad. Korotkie povesti i rasskazy. Moscow, 1966; Sobranie sochinenii (Collected works), 3 vols. Moscow, 1972–3
Writings: Sobranie sochinenii (Collected works), 3 vols. Moscow, 1925; Sobranie sochinenii (Collected works), 6 vols. Moscow and Leningrad, 1929—31; Sobranie sochinenii (Collected works), 4 vols. Moscow, 1968—9; Sochineniia (Works), 2 vols. Moscow, 1980
Writings: Sobranie sochinenii (Collected works), 3 vols. Moscow, 1984—5; Vstrechi i razluki. Moscow, 1989; Tropinka vo rzhi: o poezii i poetakh. Moscow, 1980
Writings: Sochineniia (Works), ed. V. F. Solntsev. 3 vols. St. Petersburg, 1893; 2nd edn, St. Petersburg, 1895. For complete listing, see Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., I
Writings: Sochineniia Marka Vovchka v dvukh tomakh. St. Petersburg, 1867; Sochineniia Marka Vovchka v chetyrekh tomakh. St. Petersburg, 1870; Polnoe sobranie sochinenii (Complete collected works) Marka Vovchka v semi tomakh. Saratov, 1896—1899; translations of Jules Verne, Charles Darwin, and others
Writings: Sotsial'nye osnovy zhenskogo voprosa. St. Petersburg, 1909; “Novaia zhenshchina,” Sovremennyi mir 9 (1913); Obshchestvo i materinstvo. Petrograd, 1916; Novaia moral’ i rabochii klass. Moscow, 1918; “Dorogu krylatomu Erosu !,” Molodaia gvardiia (The Young Guard) 3 (1923), 111—24; Liubov’ pchel trudovykh. Petrograd, 1923; as A. Domontovich, Zhenshchina na perelome. Moscow, 1923; Bol'shaia liubov’. Moscow and Leningrad, 1927; Izbrannoe (Selections)rannye stat'i i rechi. Moscow, 1972
Writings: Soty. Petrograd, 1918; Korabli. Petrograd, 1920; Krylatyi gos’. Petrograd, 1922; Bogoroditsyn korabl’. Berlin, 1923
Writings: Sprava ostavalsia gorodok. Moscow, 1979; Roman i Iul'ka: P'esa-razmyshleniia. Moscow, 1982; Vam i ne snilos’. Moscow, 1983; Dver’ v chuzhuiu zhizn’. Moscow, 1985. Reissued in 1997 by “AST” Press; Otchaiannaia osen’: Povesti. Moscow, 1985; “Krushenie,” Zhurnalist 1, 2 (1987); Sneg k dobru. Moscow, 1988; “Ei vo vred zhivushchaia,” in Chistye prudy. Moscow, 1989; Krushenie. Moscow, 1990; Anatomiia razvoda. Moscow, 1990; “Tri ‘liubvi’ Mashi Peredreevoi,” in Chistye prudy. Moscow, 1990; “Emigratsiia po-russku [sic] …,” Ogonek, 9 (1991); “Dochki, materi, ptitsy i ostrova,” Soglasie 6 (1991); “Puteshestviia,” Ogonek 20—21 (1992); “Ubikvisty,” Soglasie 2 (1992); “Radosti zhizni,” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 3 (1995); “Kostochka avokado,” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 9 (1995); “Love-storiia,” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 11 (1995); God Aleny: romany. Moscow, 1996; Vam i ne snilos’. Moscow, 1996; Zhenshchiny v igre bez pravil. Moscow, 1996; Mandarinovyi god: povesti i rasskazy. Moscow, 1997; “Mitina liubov’,” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 3 (1997); Prichudy liubvi. Moscow, 1997; Provintsialy v Moskve: romany. Moscow, 1997; Armiia liubovnikov, Novyi mir (NewWorld) 2, 3 (1998); Otchaiannaia osen’. Moscow, 1998; “Aktrisa i militsioner,” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 3 (1999); “Liudi stol'ko ne zhivut, skol'ko ia khochu rasskazat’,” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 1 (1999)
Writings: Sputniki. Moscow and Leningrad, 1946; Kruzhilikha. Molotov, 1947; Iasnyi bereg. Leningrad, 1949; Vremena goda. Moscow, 1954; Sentimental'nyi roman. Leningrad, 1958; Valya Volodia. Rasskazy. Moscow, 1960; Liki na zare. Istoricheskaia povest’. Leningrad, 1965; Pogovorim o strannostiakh liubvi. P'esy. Leningrad, 1968; Zametki literatora. Leningrad, 1972; O moei zhizni, knigakh i chitateliakh. Leningrad, 1975. For complete listing, see Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II
Writings: SS V. Krestovskogo (Psevdonim). 5 vols. St. Petersburg, 1892, and 1912—13; Also published literary criticism under various pseudonyms, including the series “Provintsial'nye pis'ma o nashei literature” (“Provincial Letters about Our Literature” in Otechestvennye zapiski, 1861—3)
Writings: Staraia skazka. Moscow, 1913; 2nd expanded edn, 1914; “Kholod utra: neskol'ko slov o zhenskom tvorchestve,” Zhatva 5 (1914), 249—56; poems in Uchenova, V. (ed.), Tsaritsy muz: russkie poetessy XIX-nachala XXvv. Moscow, 1989.
Writings: Stikhi bednoi devitsy, slepoi docheri derevenskogo ponomaria. St. Petersburg, 1838. Poems in Poety iz naroda. Moscow, 1901
Writings: Stikhi o prichastnosti. Paris, 1975; Zdes’, gde zhivu. Leningrad, 1983; Nebesnoe zarevo. Jerusalem, 1992; Zapiski o Peterburge: ocherki istorii goroda. St. Petersburg, 1997
Writings: Stikhi o sebe. Paris, 1931; Okna na sever. Paris, 1939; Posle vsego. Paris, 1949; Novye stikhi. Alma-Ata, 1967
Writings: Stikhi. Poems, Poémes. Ann Arbor, 1984; Ia dozhivu. New York, 1986; Vne limita. Izbrannoe (Selections). Frankfurt, 1986; Prose: Skazka o trekh golovakh. Tenafly, nj, 1986; Stikhi. Chicago, 1988; Seryi tsvet nadezhdy. London, 1989; Odessity. Moscow, 1996; Ten'portreta. Moscow, 2000
Writings: Stikhi. Frankfurt, 1969; Poberezh'e. Ann Arbor, mi, 1973; Tri tetradi stikhotvorenii. Bremen, 1975; Pereletaia snezhnuiu granitsu. Paris, 1979; Angel dereviannyi. Ann Arbor, mi, 1982; Chuzhie kamni. New York, 1983; Peremennaia oblachnost’. Paris, 1985; Gde i kogda. Paris, 1985; Tsvet vereska. Tenafly, nj, 1993; Kto chem poet. Moscow, 1997; Polden’. Frankfurt, 1970 (prose). For complete listing, see Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II
Writings: Stikhi. Paris, 1987; Moia radost’. Moscow, 1988; To li koshka, to li ptitsa … Tallin, 1988; Vozdukhplavatel’. Moscow, 1989; Neletal'noe. Moscow, 1993; Viden'e o roze. St. Petersburg, 1997
Writings: Stikhi. Paris, 1931; Telo. Berlin, 1933; “Shtorm,” Chisla 10 (1934); “Osennie list'ia,” Nov’ 7 (1934); Liubov’ k shesterym. Paris, 1935
Writings: Stikhotvoreniia I. Harbin, 1929; Stikhotvoreniia II. Shanghai, 1936; Golubaia trava. San Francisco, 1973
Writings: Stikhotvoreniia. Leningrad, 1934; Leningradskaia tetra’. Moscow, 1942; Leningradskaia poema. Leningrad, 1942, 1976; “Leningradskaia simfoniia,” Komsomolskaia Pravda (August 19, 1942); Leningrad. Moscow, 1944; Oni zhili v Leningrade. Moscow, 1945; Tvoi put’. Leningrad, 1945; Izbrannoe (Selections). Moscow, 1948, 1954; Pervorossiisk. Moscow, 1952; Sobranie sochinenii (Collected works), 2 vols. Moscow, 1958; Dnevnye zvezdy. Leningrad, 1959, 1971, 1975, 1978; 1985; Uzel: Novaia kniga stikhov. Leningrad, 1965; Vernost’: Stikhi i poemy. Leningrad, 1970; Izbrannoe (Selections)Pr. Leningrad, 1983. Sobranie sochinenii (Collected works), 3 vols. Leningrad, 1988; Govorit Leningrad; Stat’ i, 1985. P'esy i stsenarii. Leningrad, 1988; Ekho Stikhi, 1990; Proshlogo-net !: stikhi, poemy, iz rabochikh tetradei, comp. M. F. Berggol'ts. Moscow, 1999. For a more complete listing, see Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II
Writings: Stikhotvoreniia. Moscow, 1833; revised edn, 1838; revised and enlarged, 1860. Poems in Poety 1820—1830-kh godov, ed. L. Ia. Ginzburg and V. E. Vatsuro. 2 vols., Leningrad, 1972, vol. I; Bannikov,N. V. (ed.), Russkie poetessy XIX veka. Moscow, 1979.; Uchenova, V. (ed.), Tsaritsy muz: russkie poetessy XIX-nachala XXvv. Moscow, 1989.; V. E. Vatsuro, “Zhizn’ i poeziia Nadezhdy Teplovoi,” in Pamiatniki kul'tury. Novye otkrytiia. Ezhegodnik 1989. Moscow, 1990, 16—43; poems in Moskovskaia muza, ed. G. D. Klimova
Writings: Stikhotvoreniia. Moscow, 1846; Stikhotvoreniia. St. Petersburg, 1858; Polnoe sobranie sochinenii (Complete collected works), 4 vols. St. Petersburg, 1885—6; 2nd revised edn, 1894; Izbrannoe (Selections)rannye stikhi. Iaroslavl’, 1958. Zhenskaia istoriia and Otstalaia, in Vremia, 1861; poems in Poety 1840—1850 kh godov; Bannikov,N. V. (ed.), Russkie poetessy XIX veka. Moscow, 1979.; Uchenova, V. (ed.), Tsaritsy muz: russkie poetessy XIX-nachala XXvv. Moscow, 1989.
Writings: Stikhotvoreniia. Moscow, 1896; Stikhotvoreniia I—II. Moscow, 1900; Stikhotvoreniia III. St. Petersburg, 1900; Stikhotvoreniia IV St. Petersburg, 1903; Stikhotvoreniia V. St. Petersburg, 1904; Pered zakatom. St. Petersburg, 1908
Writings: Stikhotvoreniia. Moscow, 1913; Stikhotvoreniia II. Odessa, 1919; Ot Lukavogo: tret'ia kniga stikhov. Berlin, 1922; Vospominaniia. Leningrad, 1977; Vechernii svet. Leningrad, 1972; Doroga. Moscow, 1985; Grozovyi venok. St. Petersburg, 1992
Writings: Stikhotvoreniia. Petrograd, 1916; Rozy Pierii. Moscow and Petrograd, 1922; Loza. Moscow, 1923; Muzyka. Moscow, 1926; Vpolgolosa. Moscow, 1928; Sobranie stikhotvorenii. Ann Arbor, 1979; poems in M. L. Gasparov, Russkii stikh. Daugavpils, 1989; and Uchenova, V. (ed.), Tsaritsy muz: russkie poetessy XIX-nachala XXvv. Moscow, 1989.
Writings: Stikhotvoreniia. St. Petersburg, 1899; Inei. St. Petersburg, 1905; ed. Tropinka. 1906—12; Plakun-trava. St. Petersburg, 1909; tr. Lewis Caroll, Prikliucheniia Alisy v strane chudes. St. Petersburg, 1909. “Tainaia pravda” i drugie rasskazy. Moscow, 1910; Perekrestok. Povest’ v stikhakh. St. Petersburg, 1913; Prikliucheniia Kroli. Stikhi. St. Petersburg, 1914; Krupenchika. St. Petersburg, 1915; Chudesnoe kol'tso. Narodnye skazki. Moscow, 1915; Kuklin dom. Rasskaz v stikhakh. St. Petersburg, 1916; Poslednie stikhi. Moscow and St. Petersburg, 1923
Writings: Struna. Moscow, 1962; Oznob. Frankfurt-am-Main, 1968; Uroki muzyki. Moscow, 1969; Stikhi. Moscow, 1975; Svecha. Moscow, 1977; Metel’. Moscow, 1977; Sny o Gruzii. Tbilisi, 1977; Taina. Moscow, 1983; Sad. Moscow, 1987; Stikhotvoreniia. Moscow, 1988; Izbrannoe (Selections). Moscow, 1988; Poberezh'e. Moscow, 1991; Larets i kliuch. St. Petersburg, 1994; Zvuk ukazuiushchii. St. Petersburg, 1995; Griada kamnei. Moscow, 1991; Sozertsanie stekliannogo sharika. St. Petersburg, 1997; Sobranie sochinenii (Collected works), 3 vols. Moscow, 1997; Odnazhdy v dekabre. St. Petersburg, 1996 (prose); Mig bytiia. Moscow, 1997 (prose); Zimnaia zamknutost’. Moscow, 1999; Vozle elki. St. Petersburg, 1999; Nechaianie: Stikhi, dnevnik 1996—1999. Moscow, 2000
Writings: Stupeni. Harbin, 1939; Kryl'ia. Harbin, 1941; Razdum'ia. Harbin, undated, early 1940s; Na rasput'e. Shanghai, 1943; Serdtse. Shanghai, 1947; Daty, daty. Krasnodar, 1976; Shchedrost’. Krasnodar, 1986
Writings: Svetloe kol'tso, Harbin, 1944 (posthumously)
Writings: Tainyi kliuch stikhov. Sydney, 1966; Puti nevedomye. Munich, 1980
Writings: Tantsuiushchii David. New York, 1985; Stikhi. Leningrad, 1987; Trudy i dni Lavinii, Monakhini iz Ordena Obrezaniia Serdtsa. Ann Arbor, 1987; Storony sveta. Stikhi. Leningrad, 1989; Stikhi. Leningrad, 1990; Lotsiia nochi. St. Petersburg, 1993; Pesnia ptitsy na dne morskom. St. Petersburg, 1995; Mundus Imaginalis. St. Petersburg, 1996; Zapadno-vostochnyi veter. St. Petersburg, 1997; Opredelenie v durnuiu pogodu. St. Petersburg, 1997; Solo na raskalennoi trube. St. Petersburg, 1998; Stikhotvoreniia i poemy. St. Petersburg, 1999; Dikopis’ poslednego vremeni. St. Petersburg, 2001
Writings: Ten’ i telo. Paris, 1937; “Les coqs,” Cahiers du Sud 331 (1942); Bliznetsy. Paris, 1946; “Les fleur et couronnes,” Cahiers du Sud 353 (1946); Sol’. Paris, 1949; Vera: liricheskaia povest’. Paris, 1960; “O gorode i ogorode,” Mosty 12 (1966)
Writings: To bylo ranneiu vesnoi i drugie rasskazy. Moscow, 1900; 2nd edn, 1905; “Noch’,” in Sbornik na pomoshch’ uchashchimsia zhenshchinam. Moscow, 1901; “Uchenova, V. (ed.), Tol'ko chas. Moscow, 1988,” Mir bozhii 3 (1902), also in Uchenova, V. (ed.), Tol'ko chas. Moscow, 1988 i dr. rasskazy. Rostov, 1903; other edns: 1905, 1906, 1917, 1918, and Uchenova, Uchenova, V. (ed.), Tol'ko chas. Moscow, 1988.. Moscow, 1988; Nichtozhnye, 2 vols. Moscow, 1905; U svezhei mogily. St. Petersburg, 1911; “Aforizmy bessonitsy,” in Utrenniki, 1915; “Taina radosti,” Russkaia mysl'(Russian Thought)' 1—7 (1916); Okhranitel’. Moscow, 1917; 2nd edn, 1918
Writings: Trevoga: Izbrannoe (Selections)rannye stikhi 1942—1962. Moscow, 1963; Strana Iunost’. Moscow, 1966; Izbrannoe (Selections), 2 vols. Moscow, 1989; Polyn’: stikhotvoreniia i poemy. Moscow, 1989
Writings: Tsvety kitaiskoi poezii (translations of Chinese poetry from English translations, with her husband I. I. Serebrennikov). Tianjin, 1938; Velikaia legenda. San Francisco, 1967
Writings: Tsvety v konverte. Harbin, 1940
Writings: Tvorcheskii put’ Lermontova. Leningrad, 1940. “Byloe i dumy Gertsena. Leningrad, 1957. O lirike. Leningrad, 1964; 2nd edn, 1974, 1997; O psikhologicheskoi proze. Leningrad, 1971, 2nd edn, 1977, 3rd edn, 1999; Chelovek za pis'mennym stolom. Leningrad, 1982, 1989; O literaturnom geroe. Leningrad, 1979; O starom i novom. Leningrad, 1982; Literatura v poiskakh real'nosti. Leningrad, 1987; “Zapiski blokadnogo cheloveka,” Neva 1 (1984); Pretvorenie opyta. Riga, Leningrad, 1991; Moscow, 1995; Zapisnye knizhki: novoe sobranie. Moscow, 1999
Writings: U moria. Harbin, 1938
Writings: U poroga. Harbin, 1940; Belaia roshcha. Harbin, 1943; Nash dom. Sydney, 1978
Writings: V laboratorii redaktora. Moscow, 1963; “Byloe i dumy,” Gertsena. Moscow, 1966; Otkrytoe slovo. New York, 1976; Po etu storonu smerti. Iz dvevnika 1936—1976. Paris, 1978; Protsess iskliucheniia. Ocherk literaturnykh nravov. Paris, 1979; Moscow, 1990; Zapiski ob Anne Akhmatovoi, 3 vols. Moscow, 1997; Pamiati detstva. New York, 1983; Moscow, 1989; Sof'ia Petrovna. Spusk pod vodu. Moscow, 1989; Izbrannoe (Selections)rannoe. Moscow, 1997; Sobranie sochinenii (Collected works), 2 vols. Moscow, 2000
Writings: Vam i ne snilos’ … Piatnadtsat’ let spustia in Vam i ne snilos’. Moscow, 1996
Writings: Vchera i segodnia. Harbin, 1934; Stepan Chertorogov. Harbin, 1935; Kniazhny Zardeevy. Harbin, 1936, 1937; Raspiataia Rossiia. Harbin, 1938
Writings: Vechera na Karpovke, 1837—8; Moi kurskie znakomtsy, 1838; Samopozhertvovanie, 1839; Oshibka, 1841; Ocherki iuzhnoi Frantsii i Nitstsy. Iz dorozhnykh zapisok 1840—1842 godov, 2 vols., 1844; Dacha na Petergofskoi doroge, 1845—1850s; Naden'ka, 1853. Baron Reikhman (from Vechera na Karpovke), in Russkaia romanticheskaia povest’; Dacha na Petergofskoi doroge, in Uchenova, V. (ed.), Dacha na Petergofskoi doroge. Moscow, 1986.; Vechera na Karpovke. Moscow, 1986; Naden'ka, in Iakushin,N.I. (ed.), “Serdtsa chutkogo prozren'em”… Povesti i rasskazy russkikh pisatel'nits XIXV. Moscow 1991.
Writings: Vechernii al'bom. Moscow, 1910; Volshebnyi fonar’. Moscow, 1912; Iz dvukh knig. Moscow, 1913; Versty I. Moscow, 1922; Versty II. Moscow, 1921, 1922; Konets Kazanovy. Moscow, 1922; Razluka. Moscow and Berlin, 1922; Stikhi k Bloku. Berlin, 1922; Tsar-devitsa. Moscow, 1922; Psikheia. Berlin, 1922; Remeslo. Moscow and Berlin, 1923; Molodets. Prague, 1924; Posle Rossii. Paris, 1928; Lebedinyi stan. Munich, 1957; Lettreál'Amazon. Paris, 1979; Izbrannoe (Selections)Pr. Moscow, 1965; Izbrannoe (Selections)r. proza, 2 vols. New York, 1979; Stikhotvoreniia i poemy, 4 vols. New York, 1980 — 3
Writings: Vospominaniia. Moscow, 1971; 3rd expanded edn, 1983, 1995; Amor. Roman i povest’ Moia Sibir’. Moscow, 1991; O chudesnom. Moscow, 1991; Neischerpaemoe. Moscow, 1992; and a collection of poetry Moi edinstvennyi sbornik. Moscow, 1995
Writings: Vospominaniia. New York, 1979, Paris, 1982; Moscow, 1999; Vtoraia kniga. Paris, 1987; Moscow, 1990, 1999; Moe zaveshchanie i drugie esse. New York, 1982; Kniga tret'ia. Paris, 1987; “Ob Akhmatovoi,” Literaturnaia ucheba 3 (1989), 134—51; Vospominaniia, proizvedeniia, perepiska. St. Petersburg, 1999
Writings: Vsevolod Garshin: tvorchestvo i sud'ba. Moscow, 1986; Znaki vremeni: zametki o literaturnom protsesse, 1970—80-e gody. Moscow, 1987; Za otkrytym shlagbaumom: literaturnaia situatsiia kontsa 80-kh. Moscow, 1991; “Tvorets i kommentator. Roman R. Ivanychuka ‘Orda’,” Literaturnoe obozrenie (Literary Review) 5—6 (1994); “Patent na blagorodstvo: vydast li ego literatura kapitalu?” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 11 (1993); “Posle srazheniia s dubom,” Literaturnaia gazeta (Literary Gazette) 36 (September 9, 1998)
Writings: Zhenshchina. Petrograd, 1922; Nastas'ia-Koster. Moscow and Petrograd, 1923; poems in Dodnes’ tiagoteet, ed. S. Vilensky. Moscow, 1989; “Stikhi raznykh let” Lazur’ 1 (1989); “Rovesnitsa veka,” ed. A. L. Ageev and L. N. Taganov, Volga 5 (1989); Vozvrashchenie. Ivanovo, 1990; “Plamia snegov,” Literaturnoe obozrenie (Literary Review) 8 (1991); Geroi nashego vremeni. Moscow, 1992; Izbrannoe (Selections): iz gulagskogo arkhiva, ed. L. N. Taganov and Z. Ia. Kholodova. Ivanovo, 1992
Writings: Znakomye liudi, OZ 91 (1856); Nasledstvo tetushki, Otechestvennye zapiski (Notes of the Fatherland) 3 (1858); Mudrennyi chelovek, Otechestvennye zapiski (Notes of the Fatherland) 6—8 (1861); Vospominaniia institutskoi zhizni, Russkii vestnik (Russian Herald) 9—10 (1861); Gorodskie i derevenskie, Otechestvennye zapiski (Notes of the Fatherland) 3—4 (1863); also appears in Uchenova, V. (ed.), Svidanie. Moscow, 1987.
Writings: Znameniia. St. Petersburg, 1921; Pod kamennym dozhdem. St. Petersburg, 1923; Goda: Izbrannoe (Selections)rannye stikhi. Leningrad, 1935; Novye stikhi. Leningrad, 1937; Izbrannoe (Selections). Moscow and Leningrad, 1966. For more complete listings, see Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., II
Writings: ed., Antologiia novoi iugoslavskoi liriki. Belgrade, 1933; Odinochestvo. Berlin, 1935; Pod sen'iu olivy. Paris, 1948; Plecho s plechom. Paris, 1955; “Vozvrashchenie,” Novyi zhurnal (New Review) 42 (1955); “U poroga,” Novyi zhurnal (New Review) 53 (1958); “Sosny molodosti,” Novyi zhurnal (New Review) 59 (1960); “Chuzhie,” Novyi zhurnal (New Review) 70 (1962); “Annushka,” Novyi zhurnal (New Review) 89 (1969); “Poslednaia loshad’ Arzhevilia,” Mosty 13—14 (1968); Nezdeshnii dom. Munich, 1973; Vernost’. Paris, 1984
Writings: poems in Apollon. 1909—10; as E. Vasilievna with S. Marshak, Teatr dlia detei. Sbornik p'es. Krasnodar, 1922; Novyi Robinzon. Leningrad, 1924; Avtobiografiia, Izbrannoe (Selections)rannye stikhotvoreniia. 1927; repr. Moscow, 1989. Chelovek s luny. Moscow and Leningrad, 1929; Domik pod grushevym derevom, Novyi mir (NewWorld) 12 (1988). For more complete listing, see Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., I
Writings: Poems in Moskva 6 (1977); Novyi mir (NewWorld) 8 (1979); Al'manakh poezii 29 (1981), Novyi mir (NewWorld) 3 (1982); Sny na beregu Dnepra. 1985; Seminar u moria. 1986; Uravnenia s dvumia izvestnymi (film script), directed by Nadezhda Repina. 1988; Seishen v kommunal'ke. VAAP, 1990; “Alekseev i teni,” Al'manakh “Teplyi stan’” 1 (1990); Natural Foods. With Peter Dedman. 1990; P'esy dlia chteniia. Moscow, 1991. Includes Uravnenie s dvumia izvestnymi, Viktoria Vasil'eva glazami postoronnykh, and Zavistnik; Pozdnii ekipazh. 1991; “Uroki feminizma” (MS); Vremia i my, 1995; “Kapustnik,” Moskovskii komsomolets (September 22, 1996); “Opyt sotsial'noi skul'ptury,” Zvezda 2 (1996); Menia zovut zhenshchina. Moscow, 1997, 1999; Mne 40 let: avtobiograficheskii roman. Moscow, 1999; Vizit nestaroi damy: vpolne roman. Moscow, 1999; Po doroge k sebe. Moscow, 1999; Mobil'nye sviazi, Moscow, 2000. For more publications, see http:/www.arbatova.ru/publ/
Writings: Poems in Oktiabr’ 5 (1989); translations of Percy Bysshe Shelley in Izbrannoe (Selections)rannye stikhotvoreniia (1937); “Vera Merkur'eva (1876—1943): stikhi i zhizn’,” in Litsa 1 (St. Petersburg, 1995)
Writings: poems in Bannikov,N. V. (ed.), Russkie poetessy XIX veka. Moscow, 1979.; Tsaritsy muz; poems in Moskovskaia muza, ed. G. D. Kumova
Writings: with Aleksandr Gorkin, Shestikrylyi serafim. Moscow, 1992; Stechenie obstoiatel'stva. Moscow, 1993; Igra na chuzhom pole. 1994; Ukradennyi son. Various edns, Moscow, 1995—8; Ubiitsa po nevole. Various edns, Moscow, 1995—8; Smert’ radi smerti. Various edns, Moscow, 1995—7; Shesterki umiraiut pervymi. Various edns, Moscow, 1995—7; Smert’ i nemogo liubvi. Various edns, Moscow, 1995—8; Chernyi spisok. Various edns, Moscow, 1996—8; Posmertnyi obraz. Various edns, Moscow, 1996—8; Za vse nado platit’. Various edns, Moscow, 1996—8; Chuzhaia maska. Various edns, Moscow, 1996—8; Ne meshaite palachu. Various edns, Moscow, 1996—7; Stilist. Various edns, Moscow, 1996—7; Illiuziia grekha. Various edns, Moscow, 1996—7; Svetlyi lik smerti. Various edns, Moscow, 1997—8; Imia poterpevshego — Nikto. Various edns, Moscow, 1997—8; Muzhskie igry. Various edns, Moscow, 1997; Ia umer vchera. Various edns, Moscow, 1997—8; Rekviem. 2 edns, Moscow, 1998; Prizrak muzyki. Moscow, 1998; Kogda bogi smeiatsia. Moscow, 2000. Tot, kto znaet, 2 vols. Moscow, 2001. For more information, see http://www.eksmo.ru or http://www.rsl.ru
Ageev, Ageev A., and L. N. Taganov, “Rovesnitsa veka,” Volga 5 (1989), 165–8
Agenesov, V., and K. Tolkachev (eds.), Poetessy russkogo zarubezhiia. Sbornik stikhotvorenii Lidii Alekseevoi (1909—1989), Ol’ gi Anstei (1912—1985), Valentiny Sinkevich (rod. 1926g.). Moscow, 1998
Aiken, Susan, Adele Barker, Maya Koreneva, and Ekaterina Stetsenko (eds.), Dialogues/Dialogi: Literary and Cultural Exchanges between (ex-) Soviet and American Women. Durham, NC, 1994
Aikhenval'd, Iu., “E. Militsyna. Rasskazy, v. 3,” Rech’ 324 (1912)
Akhmadulina, Bella (Izabella) Akhatovna (b. 1937, Moscow). Poet, prose writer, translator, lives in Moscow
Akhmatova, Akhmatova, “O stikhakh N. L'vovoi,” Russkaia mysl' (Russian Thought) 1 (1914), 27–8
Akhmatova, Anna Andreevna (b. Gorenko, 1889, Bol'shoi Fontan, nr. Odessa; d. 1966, Moscow). A major poet of the 20th century. Member of the Acmeist school. During the Stalinist terror both her husband and son were arrested. Became spokesperson for her people during the war
Aleksandrova, Aleksandrova, “Na iskhode real'nosti,” Grani 168 (1993), 302–17
Aliger, M., “Chto takoe podvig?” in Tropinka vo rzhi. Moscow, 1980, 119–23
Aliger, Margarita Iosifovna (b. 1915, Odessa; d. 1992, Moscow). Poet, essayist, translator. Attended Gorky Literary Institute in Moscow. Prolific and loyal poet of the Stalin era; active in literature of the Thaw
Amert, Susan, In a Shattered Mirror: The Later Poetry of Anna Akhmatova. Stanford, CA, 1992
Amfiteatrov, A., “Literaturnye vpechatleniia. (E. Militsyna, Rasskazy, vv. 1—2),” Sovremennik 2 (1922)
Andersen, Larissa Nikolaevna (b. 1914, Khabarovsk), married Chaiz. Poet, ballet dancer. Wrote poetry and danced on the stages of Harbin and Shanghai until the early 1950s when she left China first for Tahiti and then France with her French husband
Andreeva, Tat'iana or Tamara. Poet
Andrew, Joe (ed. and tr.), Russian Women's Shorter Fiction: An Anthology, 1835—60. Oxford, 1996
Andrew, Joe (ed. and tr.), Russian Women's Shorter Fiction: An Anthology, 1835–60. Oxford, 1996., Joe Narrative and Desire in Russian Literature, 1822—49: The Feminine and the Masculine. New York, 1993
Andrew, Joe (ed. and tr.), Russian Women's Shorter Fiction: An Anthology, 1835–60. Oxford, 1996., Joe, Women in Russian Literature: 1780—1863. Basingstoke, 1988
Anisimova, Domna (pseudonym “Blind Domania,” b. 1812, Riazan’ province; d. after 1868, Riazan province). Daughter of poor village sexton; blind by 20, she dictated her poetry. Collection published by Russian Academy in 1838 received considerable but short-lived attention
Annenkova, Varvara Nikolaevna (b. 1795; d. 1866/1870, Moscow). Born into wealthy aristocratic family, with connections to Decembrists. Friend and relative of Lermontov; moved in Moscow literary circles in the 1830s and 1840s; published poetry, unsigned or with initials, in 1830s; 1844 collection widely reviewed
Annenskii, I., “O sovremennom lirizme,” Apollon 3 (1919)
Antalovsky, Tatjana, Der russische Frauenroman: exemplarische Untersuchungen. Munich, 1987
Aplin, H. A., “M. S. Zhukova and E. A. Gan. Women Writers and Female Protagonists. 1837—1843,” Ph.D. diss., University of East Anglia, 1988
Arbatova, Mariia (b. Gavrilina, 1957, Murom). Writer of drama and screenplays, Arbatova (whose pseudonym is taken from the Arbat, on which she lived, in Moscow) began her publishing career with poetry. Co-host of television talk show On My Own
Astman, Marina (Ledkovsky), “Avdotya Panaeva: Her Salon and Her Life,” Russian Literature Triquarterly 9 (1974), 423–32
Atkinson, Dorothy, et al. (eds.), Women in Russia. Stanford, 1977
Babenysheva, Babenysheva, “Dokument epokhi: o dnevnikakh Ol'gi Berggol'ts,” Vremia i my 57 (1980), 272–5
Bakich Olga, “Charbin: ‘Russland jenseits der Grenzen’ in Fernost,” in Karl Schlögel (ed.), Der grosse Exodus. Die russische Emigration und ihre Zentren 1917 bis 1941. Munich, 1994
Bakunina, Ekaterina Vasil'evna (b. 1889, Tsarskoe selo; d. 1976, Keighley, Yorkshire; married Novoselov; one son). Raised in St. Petersburg; matriculated at School of Agronomy; left for US, worked as a laborer; later entered law program of the Bestuzhev Women's School; left for Khar'kov, 1918, finished degree, worked as secretary of local newspaper. In Petrograd, 1921; worked as tr. and ed. at Institute of Brain Science. Emigrated c. 1922, living in Paris by 1923. Published verse collection, 1931; from 1932, editorial secretary, literary journal Chisla; published two popular erotic novels, 1933, 1935. Moved to England after World War II, wrote verse, published little
Balin, Carole B., To Reveal Our Hearts: Jewish Women Writers in Tsarist Russia. Detroit, 2000
Balzer, Marjorie Mandelstam (ed.), Russian Traditional Culture: Religion, Gender, and Customary Law. Armonk, NY, 1992
Banjanin, Banjanin, “The Prose and Poetry of Elena Guro,” Russian Literature Triquarterly 9 (1974), 303–16
Banjanin, M. “Nature and the City in the Works of Elena Guro,” Slavic and East European Journal 30 (1986)
Banjanin, M. “Of Harlequins, Dreamers and Poets: A Study of an Image in the Works of Elena Guro,” Russian Language Journal (includes some articles in Russian) (1982), 123–4
Banjanin, M. “Women Without Men in the Writings of Contemporary Soviet Women Writers,” in Daniel Rancour-Laferriere (ed.), Russian Literature and Psychoanalysis. Amsterdam and Philadelphia, 1989, 431—49
Bank, Natal'ia, Ol'ga Berggol'ts: kritiko-biograficheskii ocherk. Moscow and Leningrad, 1962
Bannikov, N. V. (ed.), Russkie poetessy XIX veka. Moscow, 1979
Baranskaia, Natal'ia (b. 1908, St. Petersburg). Writer of prose fiction. Daughter of revolutionaries, she grew up in the underground and in exile. Upon return to Russia after the 1917 revolution, she studied at Moscow University and worked at the Pushkin Historical Museum in Moscow. She began writing after retirement at the age of 58
Barker, Adele Marie, The Mother Syndrome in the Russian Folk Imagination. Columbus, OH, 1986
Barker, Adele, “Irina Grekova's ‘Na ispytaniiakh’: The History of One Story,” Slavic Review 48 (1989), 399–412
Barkova, Anna Aleksandrovna (pseudonym Kalika Perekhozhaia; b. 1901, Ivanovo-Voznesensk; d. 1976, Moscow). Poet, dramatist. Came from a working-class background and in 1918 enrolled as a member of the Circle of Genuine Proletarian Poets. Suffered repeated arrests and two long periods of exile both during and after the Stalin years. Allowed to return to Moscow in 1967
Barta, Peter, Gender and Sexuality in Russian Civilisation. Newark, NJ, 2001
Bazhenova, Taisiia Anatol'evna (d. 1978, USA). Poet
Beaujour, Elizabeth Klosty, Alien Tongues: Bilingual Russian Writers of the “First” Emigration. Ithaca, NY, 1989
Bek, Tat'iana Aleksandrovna (b. 1949, Moscow). Poet, critic, lives in Moscow, member of the Writers’ Union since 1979. Prolific reviewer, only a few examples included below
Bennett, Sandra Shaw, “‘Parnassian Sisters’ of Derzhavin's Acquaintance: Some Observations on Women's Writing in Eighteenth-Century Russia,” in L. Hughes and M. di Salvo (eds.), A Window on Russia: Papers from the V International Conference of the Study Group on Eighteenth-Century Russia. Turin, 1996, 249—56
Berberova, Nina Nikolaevna (pseudonyms: Ivelich, Gulliver, b. Karaulova, 1901, St. Petersburg; d. 1993, Philadelphia; married: 1) Vladislav Khodasevich, 1922; 2) painter N. V. Makeev, 1936; 3) pianist G. A. Kochevitsky, 1954). Raised in St. Petersburg, bourgeois family; studied philology, Rostov-on-Don, 1919—20. In St. Petersburg, 1921; published 1st poem, 1922; attended Gumilev's poetic studio, meetings of Serapion Brothers; member, Union of Poets. With husband Vladislav Khodasevich emigrated on Soviet passport, 1922, resided with Maksim Gorky in Sorrento. To Paris, 1925; Gippius's circle; co-ed. of “Green Lamp” journal Novyi dom, 1926; from 1925, correspondent for Poslednie novosti. In same, author of stories of èmigrè life, “Biiankurskie prazdniki,” 1928—40; published translations of Laclos, Dostoevsky, Rolland; during 1930s, also published four novels, biographies of Tchaikovsky and Borodin, series of long stories in Sovremennye zapiski. Remained in occupied France; after war, established weekly Russkaia mysl’, published book on Blok. Emigrated to US, 1950; ed. work at Mosty; published scholarly edns. of Khodasevich's work, biography of Budberg, vol. of collected verse, study of Russian Masonry. Taught at several universities, mainly Yale, 1958—62, Princeton, 1963—71. International recognition with autobiography in English, 1969; translations of stories bestsellers in France; visited Russia, 1989
Berggol'ts, Ol'ga Fedorovna, (b. 1910, St. Petersburg; d. 1975, Leningrad). Poet, writer, and journalist. A witness to and victim of the major cataclysms of Soviet history, Berggol'ts served the state with her poetry, prose and journalism, yet never regimented her lyrical gift. Graduated from Leningrad State University, 1930, with degree in Philology. Embarked on dual career as journalist and creative writer. In late 1930s, ex-husband, Boris Kornilov, executed. Berggol'ts imprisoned for several months. During World War II articulated the sufferings of fellow Leningraders in the blockade — through radio broadcasts, poetry, and plays. After war her work charted shift in cultural values from Stalinism to the Thaw
Bernshtam T. A., “Russian Folk Culture and Folk Religion,” in Balzer (ed.), Russian Traditional Culture, 34—47
Bernstein, Lina, “Women on the Verge of a New Language: Russian Salon Hostesses in the First Half of the Nineteenth Century,” in Goscilo, Helena and Beth Holmgren (eds.), Russia. Women. Culture. Bloomington, IN, 1996., 209–24
Bethea, David, “What Does a Six-Winged Seraphim Taste Like?” Parnassus 14:2 (1988), 310—23. (on Ratushinskaia)
Bisha, Robin, Jehanne Gheith, Christine Holden, William Wagner (eds.), Russian Women, 1698—1917: Experience and Expression. An Anthology of Sources. Bloomington, IN, 2002
Blokh, Raisa Noevna (pseudonyms: M. Leonidovna, R. Noev; b. 1899, St. Petersburg; d. 1943, German concentration camp; married literary scholar Mikhail Gorlin, 1935; one daughter). Father distinguished Jewish lawyer, brother Jacob Blokh, playwright and publisher. Studied medieval history, St. Petersburg University, 1919—20; participant in Mikhail Lozinsky's translation studio; member St. Petersburg Union of Poets, 1920. Emigrated to Berlin, 1922; degree in medieval history, University of Berlin; researcher at publishing house Monumenta Germaniae Historica with medieval historian Brachmann; member poetic circle “tridtsat’” (sic), led by Gorlin; published translations of Gozzi, Machiavelli, Tauler, Heredia; published first book of poetry, 1928. To Paris with Gorlin, 1933; earned money tutoring, doing scholarly piece-work at the Sorbonne; published several essays, medieval culture and politics. Daughter born, 1936; Gorlin arrested, 1939, detained at Potivier, transported to labor camp, Silesia; daughter died en route to Switzerland; Blokh arrested at Swiss border, sent to death in Nazi camp
Bobel, Avgusta, “Zachatnyi chas Marii Shkapskoi,” in Göpfert (ed.), Russland aus der Feder seiner Frauen. Munich, 1992, 9—20
Boym, Svetlana, Death in Quotation Marks: Cultural Myths of the Modern Poet. Cambridge, MA, 1991, 192–240
Briusov, Briusov, “Adelaida Gertsyk, ‘Stikhotvoreniia,’” Russkaia mysl' (Russian Thought) 8 (1910), 247–8
Briusov, Briusov, “Sredi stikhov,” Pechat’ i revoliutsiia 2 (1922), 143–9
Briusov, V. “Vchera, segodnia i zavtra russkoi poezii,” Pechat'i revoliutsiia 7 (1922), 65
Briusov, V. “Zhenshchiny-poety,” Dalekie i blizkie. Moscow, 1912
Broe, Mary Lynn and Angela Ingram (eds.), Women's Writing in Exile. Chapel Hill, 1989
Brooks, Jeffrey, “Revolutionary Lives, Public Identities in Pravda in the 1920s,” in Stephen White (ed.), New Directions in Soviet History. Cambridge, 1991, 27—40
Brooks, Jeffrey, When Russia Learned to Read. Princeton, NJ, 1984
Brown, Deming, The Last Years of Soviet Russian Literature: Prose Fiction, 1975—1991. Cambridge and New York, 1993
Brown, Edward J. (ed.), Canadian-American Slavic Studies 28: 2—3 (1994). Special issue on Lydiia Ginzburg
Brown, Edward J., Russian Literature Since the Revolution. Cambridge, 1982
Brown, William E., History of Russian Literature of the Romantic Period. Ann Arbor, MI, 1986
Buck, Claire (ed.), Bloomsbury Guide to Women's Writing. London, 1992
Bukhshtab, B. Ia., “Russkaia poeziia 1840—1850-kh godov,” in B. Ia. Bukhshtab (ed.), Poety 1840—1850-kh godov. Leningrad, 1972
Bulatov, D. (ed.), Eksperimental'naia poeziia: Izbrannoe (Selections)rannye stat'i. Königsberg, 1996
Buldeev, A., “N. L'vova. Staraia skazka,” Zhatva 5 (1914)
Bulich, Vera Sergeevna (b. 1898, St. Petersburg; d. 1954, Helsinki). Father S. K. Bulich, professor St. Petersburg University and director of Women's College; student, History and Philology Dept., St. Petersburg University, 1917; fled with family to estate, Kuolemajaarvi, Finland, 1918; moved to Helsinki after father's death, 1921. Published poems, stories, reviews, poetic translations, literary criticism in émigré journals; wrote plays, ballet librettos. First books collections of fairy tales in Finnish, 1927, and Russian, 1931; published four books of poetry; also published poetry in Swedish and Finnish. From 1932, worked Slavic Division, University library; member, literary society “Svetlitsa”; head of library, Institute for Soviet Studies, 1947; during 1940s—50s, associate, library of Finland-USSR Friendship, and literary ed. of Russkii zhurnal, organ of Russian Cultural-Democratic Union. Died of lung cancer
Bulin, Bulin, “Otkroite knigu molodykh,” Molodaia gvardiia 3 (1989), 237–48
Bunina, Anna Petrovna (b. 1774, Riazan’ province; d. 1829, Riazan’ province). Born into old gentry family; raised with limited education by aunts. Moved to Moscow in 1798 and St. Petersburg in 1802, where she pursued literary interests, living independently and writing essays, poetry, prose, and translations. 1815 traveled to England for her health, returning uncured in 1817; literary activities curtailed by painful cancer
Burgin, Diana Lewis “Sophia Parnok and the Writing of a Lesbian Poet's Life,” Slavic Review 51:2 (1992), 214–31
Burgin, Diana Lewis Sof'ia Parnok: the Life and Works of Russia's Sappho. New York, 1993
Burgin, Diana Lewis, “After the Ball is Over: Sophia Parnok's Creative Relationship with Marina Tsvetaeva,” Russian Review 47 (1988), 425–44
Burgin, Diana, “Laid Out in Lavender: Perceptions of Lesbian Love in Russian Literature and Criticism of the Silver Age, 1893—1917,” in Costlow, Sandler, and Vowles, 177–203
Catherine II (“the Great”), Tsaritsa (b. Sophie Frederike Augusta von Anhalt-Zerbst, 1729; d. 1796). Immensely prolific author of satirical journalism, didactic fiction, comedies, histories, memoirs, law codes, etc. Major works include the periodical Vsiakaia vsiachina (1769), numerous satirical and other dramas, the outline for a legal codex Nakaz (St. Petersburg, 1768—9), a lengthy memoir intended for her sons (dating from the 1790s), and a number of shorter memoirs
Chashchina, Liudmila. “Put’ vozvrata: k 80-letiu so dnia rozhdeniia Ol'gi Berggol'ts,” Iskusstvo Leningrada 5 (1990), 21–8
Chebotarevskaia, Anastasiia (b. 1876; d. 1921). Critic, editor, playwright and translator
Chebsheva-Dmitrieva, E., “Ol'ga Andreevna Shapir. Ee zhizn’ i deiatel'nost’,” Vestnik Evropy (Herald of Europe) 9 (1916), part 2
Chegrintseva, Emiliia Kirillovna (b. Tsegoeva, 1904, Ekaterinburg; d. 1989, Nachod, Czechoslovakia; married Sergei Chegrintsev, 1932). Raised in Kishinev; graduate gymnasium of Baroness I. P. Geiging. Emigrated with family to Prague, c. 1921. Enrolled in philosophy at Charles University, 1922; attended seminars on Soviet Russian literature, Free Russian University; from 1928, member Alfred Bem's circle “Skit”. Published verse in major èmigrè periodicals, anthologies; two verse collections, 1936, 1938. Last èmigrè publication, 1939, but continued to write; several late poems published, Moskovskii Komsomolets, 1989
Chernetsky, Vitaly “Nina Iskrenko: The Postmodern Poet and Her Few Words,” in Stephanie Sandler (ed.), Rereading Russian Poetry. New Haven, CT, 1999, 104—25
Chernetsky, Vitaly, “Epigonoi, or Transformations of Writing in the Texts of Valeriia Narbikova and Nina Iskrenko,” Slavic and East European Journal 38:4 (Winter 1994), 655–76
Chervinskaia, Lydiia Davidovna (b. 1907; d. 1988, Paris; married to poet Lazar Kel'berin). Fled with family through Constantinople, c. 1920; in Paris, 1922. Member, Union of Young Poets and Writers; attended “Green Lamp,” later “Krug” (1935—9); during 1930s, published poems, articles, reviews in Parisian journals, two books of poetry. Participated in Resistance. After war, published third book of verse; worked for Radio Liberty in Munich. Died in old-age home in Montmorency, near Paris
Chester, Pamela and Sibelan Forrester (eds.), Engendering Slavic Literatures. Bloomington, IN, 1996
Chester, Pamela, “Male and Female Sense of Self in the ‘Childhoods’ of L. N. Tolstoi and A. I. Tsvetaeva,” Tolstoy Studies Journal 2 (1989), 53–9
Chukovskaia, Lidiia The Akhmatova Journals, vol I, tr. Milena Michalski, Sylva Rubashova, Peter Norman. New York and London, 1994
Chukovskaia, Lidiia, Zapiski ob Anne Akhmatovoi, vols. I—II. Paris, 1976–80
Chukovskaia, Lydiia Korneevna (b. 1907, St. Petersburg; d. 1996, Moscow. married: 1) Tsezar Volpe; 2) Matvei Bronshtein). Memoirist, novelist. Daughter of literary critic and children's writer Kornei Chukovskii. Chronicled lives and events during the Stalinist terror. Early works able to be published only in samizdat. Under glasnost her works were published for the first time in the Soviet Union. First recipient of Sakharov Prize in 1990
Cioran, Sam, “The Russian Sappho: Mirra Lokhvitskaia,” Russian Literature Triquarterly 9 (1974), 317–35
Clark, Katerina, The Soviet Novel: History as Ritual. Chicago, 1981
Clement, Barbara Evans, Barbara Alpern Engel, and Christine Worobec (eds.), Russia's Women: Accommodation, Resistance, Transformation. Berkeley, CA, 1991
Clements, Barbara Evans, Bolshevik Feminist: The Life of Aleksandra Kollontai. Bloomington, IN, 1979
Clowes, Edith W., The Revolution of Moral Consciousness: Nietzsche in Russian Literature, 1890—1914. DeKalb, IL, 1988
Clyman, Toby W. and Diana Greene (eds.), Women Writers in Russian Literature. Westport, CT, 1994
Clyman, Toby W. and Judith Vowles (eds.), Russia Through Women's Eyes: Autobiographies from Tsarist Russia. New Haven, CT and London, 1996
Conte, Francis, “Paganism and Christianity in Russia: ‘Double’ or ‘Triple’ Faith?” in The Christianization of Ancient Russia. A Millennium: 988—1988. Paris, 1992, 207–15
Cook, Albert and Pamela Perkins (eds.), The Burden of Sufferance: Women Poets of Russia. New York, 1993
Cook, Cook, “The Poetry of Irina Ratushinskaya,” Journal of Russian Studies 53 (1987), 8–15
Cooper, Nancy L., “Secret Truths and Unheard-of Women: Poliksena Solov'eva's Fiction as Commentary on Vladimir Solov'ev's Theory of Love,” Russian Review 56:2 (April 1997), 178–91
Cornwell, Neil (ed.), Reference Guide to Russian Literature. London and Chicago, 1998
Costlow, Jane T., Stephanie Sandler, and Judith Vowles (eds.), Sexuality and the Body in Russian Culture. Stanford, 1993
Costlow, Jane, “The Gallop, the Wolf, the Caress: Eros and Nature in The Tragic Menagerie,” Russian Review 56:2 (April 1997), 192–208
Dalton, Margaret, “A Russian Best-Seller of the Early Twentieth Century: Evdokiya Apollonovna Nagrodskaya's The Wrath of Dionysus,” in Julian W. Connolly and Sonia J. Ketchian (eds.), Studies in Russian Literature in Honor of Vsevolod Setchkarev. Columbus, OH, 1986, 102—12
Dalton-Brown, Sally, “A Map of the Human Heart: Tatyana Tolstaya's Topographies,” Essays in Poetics 21 (1996), 1–18
Damanskaia, Avgusta (Avgustina) Filippovna (pseudonym Arsenii Merich; b. Veisman, 1875/77, Popeliukha, Podol'sk province; d. Cormeilles-en-Parisis, near Paris, 1959). Attended school, Odessa. Married, moved to St. Petersburg, 1892/1901; degree, Higher Courses for Women; studied piano, St. Petersburg Conservatory. Began publishing stories, poetry in prestigious journals as A. Fillipov, 1903. Published numerous translations, incl. first Russian translations of Romaine Rolland, Herbert Wells, Octave Mirbeau. After Revolution, worked at “Vsemirnaia literatura”, met Evgenii Zamiatin. Emigrated to Berlin, 1920; published anti-Bolshevik pamphlet, two short novels. From 1923, governing member, Union of Russian Translators, Germany; permanent staff of Poslednie novosti. Moved to Paris, 1923; published stories, travel sketches, criticism in major èmigrè periodicals and as separate volumes; articles for American and French press. Postwar stories concern Resistance. Prolific translator of contemporary French, German, Italian, English, and Polish literature
Darem, Elena–––Elena Nikitina. Poet
Dashkova, Polina (b. 1960). Enrolled in Literary Institute in 1979. Poetry first published in Iunost’ and Sel'skaia molodezh’. In early 1990s worked as head of the literature section of Russkii kur'er. Important figure in Post-Soviet genre of detective novel
Dashkova, Princess Ekaterina Romanovna (b. Vorontsova, 1743; d. 1810). Dramatist, journalist, memoirist. Appointed Director of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 1783. Ed. of Sobesednik liubitelei russkogo slova and Ezhemesiachnye sochineniia. Major works include Mon histoire (1804—5: first published London, 1840)
Decter, Jacqueline (ed.), Decter, Jacqueline (ed.), Soviet Women Writing. New York, 1990.. New York, 1990
Deisha, Elena Al'bertovna (pseudonym Georgii Peskov; b. Repman, 1885, Moscow; d. 1977, near Paris; married to Adrian Deisha; one son). Father well-known Moscow physician. Began writing stories at early age; graduate, Higher Courses for Women, Moscow. Emigrated with husband and son to France through Baltics, 1924. Published stories in èmigrè journals and newspapers, 1926—32, published two collections. Also wrote in French. Lived near Paris but apart from literary community
Demidova, Ol'ga, “Memuary pisatel'nits russkoi emigratsii (po materialam Bakhmetevskogo arkhiva,” in Ei ne dano prokladyvat’ novye puti …? Iz istorii zhenskogo dvizheniia v Rossii, vypusk 2. Sbornik nauchnykh trudov. St. Petersburg, 1998
Dewey, H. W. and A. M. Kleimola, “Muted Eulogy: Women Who Inspired Men in Medieval Rus’,” Russian History 10:2 (1983), 188–200
Diao Shao-hua, “Khudozhestvennaia literatura russkogo zarubezh'ia v g. Kharbine za pervye 20 let (1905—1925),” Rossiiane v Azii 3 (Fall 1996), 57–109
Dmitrieva, Elizaveta (pseudonym Cherubina de Gabriak; b. 1887, d. 1928). Poet, prose writer, dramatist, and translator
Dmitrieva, Faina Leonidovna (b. 1913, Hengdaohezi Station, Chinese Eastern Railway, China; d. 1990, Sverdlovsk, USSR; married name Kononova). Poet. Published in journals and planned a second book of poetry. In the 1950s went to the USSR
Dmitrieva, Valentina Iovovna (b. 1859, Voronino, Saratov province; d. 1947, Sochi; married to revolutionary, Ershov). From family of educated serfs; taught in village school, but dismissed for populist sympathies. Entered Women's Medical Courses, St. Petersburg; graduated 1886, but exiled for four years, forbidden to practice. Wrote more than 70 realist stories and novels, 1880s to early 1900s, and autobiography of early life, 1930
Dolgorukaia, Princess Natal'ia Borisovna (b. Sheremet'eva, 1714; d. 1771). Memoirist. From a highly-placed aristocratic family; her exile with her husband, Ivan Dolgorukii, to Siberia, his execution and her subsequent impoverished existence form the substance of her memoirs (Zapiski, written in the late 1760s, and published in 1810)
Dolina, Veronika Arkad'evna (b. 1956, Moscow) Poet and singer-songwriter, lives in Moscow
Donbrovskaia, Rozaliia Iogannovna (b.1896, Russia —?). Novelist
Dorotin, S., “Gospozha Nagrodskaia i eia roman,” Izvestiia knizhnykh magazinov T-va M. O. Vol'f 11 (1911)
Drunina, Iuliia Vladimirovna (b. 1924, Moscow; d. 1992, Moscow). Poet and translator. Worked during the war as an officer in a medical battalion. Studied at Gorky Literary Institute in Moscow. Elected deputy of Supreme Soviet in 1989. In despair over personal loneliness and over the fate of her country, she took her own life
Durova, Nadezhda Andreevna (pseudonyms: A. Aleksandrov, Kavalerist-devitsa; b. 1783, Ukraine; d. 1866, Elabuga; married name Chernova). Soldier (1807) and officer (1808—16) in the Russian light cavalry. Author of prose fiction and autobiography. Best known for her Notes of a Cavalry Maiden (1836), an account of her service in the Napoleonic wars, first published 1836 in Pushkin's Sovremennik (The Contemporary) with his preface
Dzhangirov, Karen (ed.), Antologiia russkogo verlibra. Moscow, 1991
Edmondson, Linda, Feminism in Russia, 1900—1917. Stanford, 1984
Efimov, Nina, Christine D. Tomei, Christine D. (ed.), Russian Women Writers, 2 vols. New York and London, 1999., and Richard Chapple (eds.), Critical Essays on the Prose and Poetry of Modern Slavic Women. Lewiston, NY, 1998
Engel'gardt, Liudmila Nikolaevna (b. 1911, Smolensk, Russia; d. 1988, Tashkent, USSR, married name Sherever). Poet. Emigrated with widowed mother to Harbin and became a pharmaceutical chemist. In the 1930s moved to Shanghai, married a British subject. During World War II was interned in a Japanese camp for foreign nationals, where she lost a young son. After the war, she and her husband moved to Australia and soon divorced. She and her daughter returned to Shanghai and went to the USSR in 1956
Engel, Barbara Alpern, Mothers & Daughters. Women of the Intelligentsia in Nineteenth-Century Russia. Cambridge and New York, 1983
Engelstein, Laura and Stephanie Sandler (eds), Self and Story in Russian History, Ithaca, NY, 2000
Engelstein, Laura, The Keys to Happiness. Sex and the Search for Modernity in Fin-de-Siécle Russia. Ithaca, NY and London, 1992
Epshtein, Mikhail, “Metamorfoza (o novykh techeniiakh v poezii 80-kh godov)” in Epshtein, Paradoksy novizny. Moscow, 1988, 139–76
Eremin, I. P., Literatura drevnei Rusi. Moscow, 1966
Ermolin, Evgenii, “Zhit’ I umeret’ v Permi,” Novyi mir (NewWorld) 12 (1997). Review of Nina Gorlanova's Vsia Perm’
Ezhov, I. S., and E. I. Shamurin (eds.) Russkaia poeziia XX veka: antologiia russkoi lirike pervoi chetverti XX veka. Moscow, 1991
Fainshtein, M. Sh. (ed.), Russkie pisatel'nitsy i literaturnyi protsess v kontse XVIII—pervoi treti XXvv. Sbornik nauchnykh statei. Wilhelmshorst, 1995
Fainshtein, M. Sh., Pisatel'nitsy pushkinskoi pory: Istoriko-literaturnye ocherki. Leningrad, 1989
Farnsworth, Beatrice Brodsky, Aleksandra Kollontai: Socialism, Feminism and the Bolshevik Revolution. Stanford, 1980
Fedorova, Nina (Antonina Fedorovna Podgorinova; b. 1895, Lokhvitsa, Ukraine; d. 1985, Oakland, California). Prose writer. Shortly before the Revolution moved to Harbin where in 1923 married a historian V. Riazanovskii. The family lived in Tianjin, and in 1938 moved to the USA, where in the 1940s she wrote short stories and several novels in English and in Russian, some of which depict Russian èmigrè life in China
Fedotov, G. P., The Russian Religious Mind. Vol. I. Kievan Christianity: The Tenth to the Thirteenth Centuries. Cambridge, MA, 1966
Feiler, Lily, Marina Tsvetaeva: The Double Beat of Heaven and Hell. Durham, NC and London, 1994
Feinstein, Elaine, A Captive Lion: The Life of Marina Tsvetaeva. London, 1987
Fitzpatrick, Sheila and Yuri Slezkine (eds.), In the Shadow of Revolution: Life Stories of Russian Women from 1917 to the Second World War. Princeton, NJ, 1999
Forrester, S., “Bells and Cupolas: The Formative Role of the Female Body in the Poetry of Marina Tsvetaeva,” Slavic Review 51: 2 (1992), 232–46
Forrester, Sibelan “Wooing the Other Woman: Gender in Women's Love Poetry in the Silver Age,” in Chester, Pamela and Sibelan Forrester (eds.), Engendering Slavic Literatures. Bloomington, IN, 1996., 107–34
Forrester, Sibelan, “Reading for a Self: Self-Definition and Female Anxiety in Three Women Poets,” Russian Review 1 (1996), 21–36
Foster, Edward and Vadim Mesyats (eds.), The New Freedoms: Contemporary Russian and American Poetry. Hoboken, 1994
Franklin, Simon and Jonathan Shepherd, The Emergence of Rus 750—1200. London, 1996
Fuks, Aleksandra Andreevna (b. c. 1805, Apekhtina; d. 1853, Kazan). Born into family with ties to merchantry; raised by aunt; married German-born physician in 1821; of five children, one daughter survived. Made Kazan home a literary center in 1830s and 1840s; in the 1830s traveled to Moscow and introduced to writers, including Pushkin. Published poems in Kazan and St. Petersburg journals. Combined literary interests with ethnography
Fusso, Susanne and Alexander Lehrman (eds.), Essays on Karolina Pavlova. Evanston, IL, 2001
Göpfert, Frank, Dichterinnen und Schriftstellerinnen in Russland von der Mitte des 18. bis zum Beginn des 20. Jahrhunderts: eine Problemskizze. Munich, 1992
Göpfert, Frank, Russland aus der Feder seiner Frauen zum femininen Diskurs in der Russischen Literatur. Munich, 1992
Gan, Elena (“Zeneida R-va”; b. Fadeeva, 1814; d. 1842; married Petr Gan, an artillery captain, 1830). Two daughters, one son; both daughters became writers (Elena Blavatskaia and Vera Zhelikhovskaia). Gan's friendship with Osip Senkovskii, the notorious author and ed. of Biblioteka dlia chteniia (Library for Reading), led her to publish most of her work in that journal beginning with Ideal in 1837. Despite her slim literary output (only 11 tales in all), she was regarded as one of Russia's most famous female authors by Vissarion Belinsky, Ivan Turgenev, and others
Ganina, Maiia Anatol’ evna (b. 1927, Moscow). Writer of prose fiction, travelogues, and essays. Received a technical education. She graduated from the Gorky Literary Institute in 1954, the same year she published her first novella. Explores subjects ranging from love relationships to the conflict between personal life and professional career. In addition to her fiction, she has authored a sociological study of women in an industrial town on the Kama River
Garros, Veronique, Natalia Korenevskaya, and Thomas Lahusen, Intimacy and Terror: Soviet Diaries of the 1930s. New York, 1995
Gasiorowska, Xenia, Women in Soviet Fiction, 1917—1964. Madison, WI, 1968
Gasparov, Gasparov M., “Iz literaturnogo naslediia: Kassandra,” Oktiabr’ 5 (1989), 149–59
Gasparov, M. L. Introduction to publication of poems in Litsa 1. St. Petersburg, 1995
Gasparov, M. L., et al. (eds.), Sto odna poetessa serebriannogo veka: antologiia. St. Petersburg, 2000
Gertsyk, Adelaida (b. 1874, d. 1925). Poet, prose writer, translator
Gertsyk, Evgeniia, Vospominaniia. Paris, 1973
Gessen, Masha (ed.), Half A Revolution. Pittsburgh and San Francisco, 1995
Gheith, Jehanne Finding the Middle Ground: Krestovskii, Tur, and the Power of Ambivalence in Nineteenth-Century Russian Women's Prose (forthcoming)
Gheith, Jehanne, “The Superfluous Man and the Necessary Woman: A ‘Re-vision’,” Russian Review (April 1996), 226–44
Ginzburg, Evgeniia Semenovna (b. 1904, Moscow; d. 1977, Moscow). Memoirist and educator. A political activist and teacher who had rejected her middle-class family background for a life dedicated to the Communist Party, Ginzburg's new world fell apart when she and her first husband, a prominent Party bureaucrat, were arrested in 1937. Her surviving son from this marriage, Vasilii Aksyonov, later became famous as a talented dissident writer. She endured 18 years in jail, camp, and exile, and bore coherent, eloquent witness to her ordeal in the two-volume memoir Krutoi marshrut (the first volume is translated as Journey into the Whirlwind, the second as Within the Whirlwind)
Ginzburg, Lydiia Iakovlevna (b. 1902, Odessa, d. 1990). Literary and cultural critic, writer, memoirist. The lone female member among the influential Formalist group, Ginzburg developed into a prominent literary scholar whose innovative critical work focused on the complex interactions between literary creation, life experience, and spiritual values. A keen interpreter of non-fiction, Ginzburg also produced a trenchant journal-memoir of her own experiences and observations on Soviet culture, Chelovek za pis'mennym stolom (At One's Desk, 1982), and an extraordinary analysis in fiction of the Leningrad siege, Zapiski blokadnogo cheloveka (Notes of a Blockade Survivor, 1984). In the 1980s Ginzburg truly flourished as a public intellectual, at last able to publish her more provocative and personalized writing, and serving as an intellectual conduit between pre- and post-Stalinist generations of the intelligentsia
Gippius, Zinaida (pseudonyms: Anton Krainii, Tovarishch German, Lev Pushchin, Roman Arenskii, Anton Kirsha; b. 1869, d. 1945). Poet, dramatist, short story writer, novelist, literary critic
Glasse, Antonia, “The Formidable Woman: Portrait and Original,” Russian Literature Triquarterly 10 (1974), 433–53
Glinka, Avdot'ia Pavlovna (b. Golenishcheva-Kutuzova, 1795, St. Petersburg; d. 1863, Tver’). Born into old gentry family; well-educated; married Fedor Glinka in 1829; lived in Moscow 1835—53, St. Petersburg in late 1850s, and Tver’ until her death. Salon hostess, poet and translator of German poetry, assisted husband in literary work. Devout and charitable, wrote on religious subjects. Published poems in conservative literary journals and almanacs. After 1850s turned to prose
Golovina, Alla Sergeevna (b. Baroness Steiger, 1909, Nikolaevka, near Kiev; d. 1987, Brussels; married 1) sculptor Alexander Golovin, 1929; 2) Philippe Gilles de Pelichy, 1951; one son). Swiss aristocratic family in Ukraine since 1815, father Duma member, brother poet Anatoly Steiger. Emigrated with family through Constantinople, 1920; in Czechoslovakia, 1921; attended Russian school, Moravskà Tř;ebovà. Married Golovin, 1929; son writer Sergei Golovin. Degree, Russian history and philology, Charles University, 1931; member, Alfred Bem's “Skit,” co-ed. almanac Skit 2 (1934); participant Khodasevich's “Perekrestok”; published verse collection, 1935. To Paris, 1935. Frequented literary cafè “Kupol”; friendship with Tsvetaeva. Joined parents, Switzerland, 1939, for duration of World War II. Married Belgian citizen, 1951; to Belgium, 1955. From 1950s, wrote mainly short stories, published little; most of her books appeared posthumously. Visited USSR, met Nadezhda Mandel'stam, 1967
Gorbanevskaia, Natal'ia Evgen'eva (b. 1936, Moscow). Poet, journalist, political activist. Emigrated from USSR, 1975; lives in Paris
Gorlanova, Nina (b. 1947, near Perm). First published fiction in 1980 after abandoning graduate study in philology. After initial success, her works were denied publication until the late 1980s for ideological reasons. Winner of the Russian Booker Prize for 1996
Gorlanova, Nina, et al. (eds.), Chego khochet zhenshchina: sbornik zhenskikh rasskazov. Moscow, 1993
Gornaia, Liubov’. Poet
Gornfel'd, A. G., “E. Letkova, Rasskazy,” Russkoe bogatstvo (RussianWealth) 8 (1913)
Gorodetskaia, Nadezhda Danilovna (b. 1901, Moscow; d. 1985, Witney, England). Father journalist D. M. Gorodetskii. Emigrated through Constantinople to Zagreb, 1919; studied Zagreb University. To Paris, 1924; Studio Franco-Russe; friendly with writers, religious philosophers Kuprin, Mat’ Mariia, Berdiaev, Paul Bazin. Published two novels, several stories in Russian and French. To England, studied theology, College of the Ascension, Birmingham, and Oxford, 1934—5; published thesis in English, The Humiliated Christ, 1938; Ph.D., Oxford, 1944. Taught Oxford, 1941—56; chair, Russian Dept., University of Liverpool. British citizenship; made several visits to USSR
Goscilo, Helena “Big-Buck Books: Pulp Fiction in Postsoviet Russia,” in Russian Culture of the 1990s, ed. Helena Goscilo, 23:1 (Winter 2000). Special issue of Studies in 20th Century Literature
Goscilo, Helena “Coming a Long Way, Baby: A Quarter-Century of Russian Women's Fiction,” The Harriman Institute Forum 6:1 (September 1992)
Goscilo, Helena “Mother as Mothra: Totalizing Narrative and Nurture in Petrushevskaia,” in Sonya Stephan Hoisington (ed.), A Plot of Her Own: The Female Protagonist in Russian Literature. Evanston, IL, 1995, 102—13
Goscilo, Helena “Perspective in Tatyana Tolstaya's Wonderland of Art,” World Literature Today 67:1 (Winter 1993), 80—90. This issue also contains an interview with the author
Goscilo, Helena (ed. and tr.), Russian and Polish Women's Fiction. Knoxville, TN, 1985
Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Fruits of Her Plume: Essays on Contemporary Russian Women's Culture. Armonk, NY, 1993
Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Balancing Acts. Bloomington, IN, 1989.. Bloomington, IN, 1989
Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Lives in Transit. Ann Arbor, MI, 1995
Goscilo, Helena (ed.), Skirted Issues: The Discreteness and Indiscretions of Russian Women's Prose. Special issue of Russian Studies in Literature 28:2 (Spring 1992)
Goscilo, Helena Dehexing Sex: Russian Womanhood During and After Glasnost. Ann Arbor, MI, 1996
Goscilo, Helena The Explosive World of Tatyana N. Tolstaya's Fiction. Armonk, NY, 1996
Goscilo, Helena and Beth Holmgren (eds.), Russia. Women. Culture. Bloomington, IN, 1996
Goscilo, Helena and Byron Lindsey (eds.), Glasnost: An Anthology of Literature under Gorbachev. Ann Arbor, MI, 1990
Goscilo, Helena and Byron Lindsey Wild Beach and Other Stories. Ann Arbor, MI, 1992
Goscilo, Helena, “Women's Wards and Wardens: The Hospital in Contemporary Russian Women's Fiction,” Canadian Woman Studies 10 (Winter 1989)
Gove, A. F., “Stereotype and Beyond: Role Conflict and Resolution in the Poetics of Marina Tsvetaeva,” Slavic Review 2 (1977) 231–56
Gove, Antonina Filonov, “Gender as a Poetic Feature in the Poetry of Zinaida Gippius,” American Contributions to the VIIIth International Congress of Slavists, vol. I: Linguistics. Columbus, OH, 1978, 377–407
Gracheva, A. M. “‘Zhiznetvorchestvo’ Anny Mar,” in Litsa. Biograficheskii al'manakh, 7. Moscow/St. Petersburg, 1996
Gracheva, A. M., “Estetika russkogo moderna i zhenskaia proza nachala XX veka (A. A. Verbitskaia),” in Frank Göpfert (ed.), Dichterinnen und Schriftstellerinnen in Russland von der Mitte des 18. Jahrhunderts bis zum Beginn des 20 Jahrhunderts: eine Problemskizze. Munich, 1992
Greber, Erika, “Carnivalization of the Short Story: Tatyana Tolstaya's The Poet and the Muse,” Essays in Poetics 21 (1996), 50–78
Greene, Diana, “Gender and Genre in Pavlova's A Double Life,” Slavic Review (Fall 1995), 563–77
Greenleaf, Monika, and Stephen Moeller-Sally (eds.), Russian Subjects: Empire, Nation and the Culture of the Golden Age. Evanston, IL, 1998
Gregg, Richard, “A Brackish Hippocrene: Nekrasov, Panaeva, and the ‘Prose of Love’,” Slavic Review 34: 4 (December 1975), 731–51
Grekova, I. (pen name for Elena Sergeevna Venttsel; b. Dolgintsova, 1907, Revel’, Tallin). Prose writer, mathematician. Married D. A. Venttsel, a ballistics expert, three children. Graduate University of Leningrad. Taught at Zhukovsky Military Aviation Academy in Moscow. One of few women scientists to earn the doktorat. Resigned in 1967 in connection with her novella Na ispytaniiakh
Grenier, Svetlana, “‘Everyone Knew Her, No One Noticed Her’: The Fate of the Vospitatel'nitsa (Female Ward) in Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature,” Ph.D. diss., Columbia, 1991
Grinberg, I., Vera Inber: kritiko-biograficheskii ocherk. Leningrad, 1961
Grossman, Joan Delaney, “Feminine Images in Old Russian Literature and Art,” California Slavic Studies 11 (1980), 33–70
Grossman, Joan Delaney, “Valery Briusov and Nina Petrovskaia: Clashing Models of Life in Art,” in Irina Paperno and J. D. Grossman (eds.), Creating Life: The Aesthetic Utopia of Russian Modernism. Stanford, CA, 1994, 122—50
Gumilev, N., Pis'ma o russkoi poezii. Petrograd, 1923, 144–6
Guro, Elena Genrikhovna (pseudonym Eleonora von Notenberg; b. 1877, St. Petersburg; d. 1913, Uusikirkko, Finland). Poet, prose writer, dramatist, artist. A painter by training, Guro became the only woman to occupy a prominent place in early Futurist literature
Hackel, S., Pearl of Great Price: The Life of Mother Maria Skobtsova 1891—1945. London, 1982
Haight, Amanda, Anna Akhmatova: A Poetic Pilgrimage. Oxford, 1990
Halfin, Igal, “From Darkness to Light: Student Communist Autobiography During NEP,” Jahrbücher für Geschichte Osteuropas 45 (1997), 210–36
Harris, Jane Gary (ed.), Autobiographical Statements in Twentieth Century Russian Literature. Princeton, NJ, 1990
Harussi, Yael, “Women's Social Roles as Depicted by Women Writers in Early Nineteenth-Century Russian Fiction,” in J. Douglas Clayton (ed.), Issues in Russian Literature before 1917: Selected Papers of the Third World Congress for Soviet and East European Studies. Columbus, OH, 1989, 35—48
Heaton, Julia, “Russian Women's Writing — Problems of a Feminist Approach, with Particular Reference to the Writing of Marina Palei,” Slavonic and East European Review 75:1 (January 1997), 63–85
Heldt, Barbara “Motherhood in a Cold Climate,” Russian Review 3 (1992), expanded version in Costlow, Sandler, and Vowles
Heldt, Barbara, “The Burden of Caring,” The Nation 244 (June 13, 1987), 820
Heldt, Barbara, “The Burden of Caring,” The Nation 244 (June 13, 1987), Barbara “Gynoglasnost: Writing the Feminine,” in Mary Buckley (ed.), Perestroika and Soviet Women. New York, 1992
Heldt, Barbara, Terrible Perfection. Bloomington, IN, 1987
Hodgson, Katharine Written with the Bayonet: Soviet Russian Poetry of World War II. Liverpool, 1996
Hodgson, Katharine, “Kitezh and the Commune: Recurrent Themes in the Work of Ol'ga Berggol'ts,” Slavonic and East European Review 74:1 (1996), 1–18
Hoisington, Sonya Stephan, (ed.), A Plot of Her Own: The Female Protagonist in Russian Literature. Evanston, IL, 1995
Hoisington, Thomas H. (ed. and tr.), Out Visiting and Back Home. Evanston, IL, 1998
Holmgren, Beth “Stepping Out/Going Under: Women in Russia's Twentieth-Century Salons,” in Goscilo, Helena and Beth Holmgren (eds.), Russia. Women. Culture. Bloomington, IN, 1996., 225–46
Holmgren, Beth “Why Russian Girls Loved Charskaia,” Russian Review 54 (1995), 91–106
Holmgren, Beth, Women's Works in Stalin's Time: On Lidiia Chukovskaia and Nadezhda Mandelstam. Bloomington, IN, 1993
Hoogenboom, Hilde Maria, “A Two-Part Invention: The Russian Woman Writer and Her Heroines from 1860—1917,” Ph.D. diss., Columbia 1996
Hoogenboom, Hilde, “Mat’ Gogolia i otets Aksakovykh: Kak Nadezhda Sokhanskaia nashla rodnoi iazyk,” in Nataliia Kamenetskaia (ed.), Fenomen pola v kul'ture. Moscow, 1998, 149—59
Hubbs, Joanna, Mother Russia: The Feminine Myth in Russian Culture. Bloomington, IN, 1988
Iakushin, N. I. (ed.), “Serdtsa chutkogo prozren'em” … Povesti i rasskazy russkikh pisatel'nits XIX v. Moscow, 1991
Iankovskaia, Viktoriia Iur'evna (b. 1909, Vladivostok; d. 1996, San Francisco). Poet, short story writer
Ianovskii, N., Lidiia Seifullina: Kritiko-biograficheskii ocherk. Moscow, 1959; 2nd edn, 1972
Ievleva, Varvara Nikolaevna (b. 1900, Russia; d. 1960, USSR). Poet, journalist. Emigrated first to Harbin, then Shanghai. Went to the USSR after World War II
Ignatova, Elena Alekseevna (b. 1947, Leningrad). Poet, screenwriter; lives in Jerusalem
Il'ina, Natal'ia Iosifovna (b. 1914, St. Petersburg; d. 1994, Moscow). Satirist, journalist, memoirist, novelist, and autobiographer. Married to linguist A. A. Reformatskii. Fled with her family to Harbin after the Revolution. Grew up in Harbin and Shanghai where she became a feuilletonist for èmigrè press. Later worked for pro-Soviet press. Returned to USSR in 1947. Graduated from Literary Institute in Moscow. Began writing satire for Krokodil. In last decades of her life turned to literary memoirs, writing reminiscences of Akhmatova, Vertinskii, Chukovskii, and her husband Reformatskii
Il'nek, Nina. Poet
Inber, Vera Mikhailovna (b. 1890, Odessa; d. 1972, Moscow; married to I. D. Strashun, MD). From intelligentsia family; studied history and philology at the Odessa Higher Courses for Women, left during 2nd year; first published 1910; poet, writer, journalist; member of Union of Soviet Writers, 1934; member of CPSU, 1944; Stalin Prize for Pulkovskii meridian, Pochti tri goda, 1946
Ingemanson, Birgitta, “The Political Function of Domestic Objects in the Fiction of Alexandra Kollontai,” Slavic Review 48 (1989), 71–82
Isenberg, Charles, “The Rhetoric of Hope Against Hope,” in Jane Gary Harris (ed.), Autobiographical Statements in Twentieth-Century Russian Literature. Princeton, NJ, 1990
Iskrenko, Nina Iur'evna (b. 1951, Petrovsk; d. 1996, Moscow). Poet. Studied physics at Moscow University, lived in Moscow until her death
Iunge, Ekaterina Fedorovna (b. 1843, d. 1913). Artist, half-sister of Kamenskaia, whose memoir, Vospominaniia (1843—1860 gg.) came out in 1914, after partial publication in 1905 and 1911
Ivanits, Linda J., Russian Folk Belief. Armonk, NY, 1989
Izvekova, Mariia Evgrafovna (married name Bedriaga; b. 1789?, d. 1830). Daughter of an army officer; prolific author of novels, poetry, fiction
Jensen, K. B., Russian Futurism, Urbanism and Elena Guro. Aarhus, 1977
Johanson, Christine, Women's Struggle for Higher Education in Russia, 1855—1900. Kingston, Ontario, 1987
Johnson, Kent and Stephen M. Ashby (eds.), Third Wave: The New Russian Poetry. Ann Arbor, MI, 1992
Jones, Malcolm V. and Robin Feuer Miller (eds.), Cambridge Companion to the Classic Russian Novel. Cambridge, 1998
Kabysh, Inna Writings: Lichnye trudnosti (1994); Detskii mir. Moscow, 1996; poems in Ogonek 10 (1990), 16; Novyi mir (NewWorld) 1 (1996), 41—9; Druzhba narodov (Peoples' Friendship) 6 (1997), 74—7; Druzhba narodov (Peoples' Friendship) 8 (1996), 8—12; Druzhba narodov (Peoples' Friendship) 3 (1994), 72–5
Kabysh, Inna. (b. Moscow). Poet, teacher of literature
Kagal, Ayesha and Natasha Perova (eds.), Kagal, Ayesha and Natasha Perova (eds.), Present Imperfect. Boulder, CO, 1996.. Boulder, CO, 1996
Kalina-Levine, V., “Through the Eyes of the Child: the Artistic Vision of Elena Guro,” Slavic and East European Journal 25:2 (1981), 30–43
Kamenskaia, Mariia Fedorovna (b. Tolstaia, 1817, d. 1898). Author of sporadic fiction based on her own life or family tradition (“Piat'desiat let nazad,” Otechestvennye zapiski 10—12 [1860] and “Znakomye,” Vremia 10 [1861]). Her memoir, “Vospominaniia,” was first published in Istoricheskii vestnik 1—10, 12 (1894) and has recently been reissued in Russia (Moscow, 1991)
Kardin, V., Dve sud'by: Lidiia Seifullina i ee povest’ ‘Virineia’. Moscow, 1975
Karlinsky, Simon (ed.), The Bitter Air of Exile. Berkeley, CA, 1977
Karlinsky, Simon (ed.), The Bitter Air of Exile: Russian Writers in the West 1922—1972. Berkeley, CA, 1977
Karlinsky, Simon, Marina Tsvetaeva: The Woman, Her World and Her Poetry. Cambridge, 1985
Karlinsky, Simon, Russian Drama from its Beginnings to the Age of Pushkin. Berkeley, CA, 1985, 83—92 (on Catherine II); 192—3 (on Titova)
Karlinsky, Simon. “Introduction: Who was Zinaida Gippius?” in Vladimir Zlobin (ed.), A Difficult Soul: Zinaida Gippius, tr. and intro., Simon Karlinsky. Berkeley, CA, 1980, 1—21
Kasack, Wolfgang, ed. Dictionary of Russian Literature since 1917, tr. Maria Carlson and Jane T. Hodges. New York, 1988
Kataev, V., “Vechernii svet”, Znamia 6 (1972), and preface in Krandievskaia, Doroga. Moscow, 1985
Katerli, Nina Semenovna (b. 1934, Leningrad). Holds a degree in engineering from a technical institute in her native St. Petersburg (Leningrad). First prose published in 1973. Activist against anti-Semitism
Kelly, Catriona “Women's Writing in Russia,” in Cornwell, Reference Guide
Kelly, Catriona (ed. and tr.), Utopias: Russian Modernist Texts, 1905—1940. London, 1999
Kelly, Catriona (ed.), An Anthology of Russian Women's Writing. Oxford, 1994
Kelly, Catriona, “I. Grekova and N. Baranskaia: Soviet Women's Writing and De-Stalinisation,” Russistika 5 (June 1992), 39—43; 6 (1992), 14–18
Kelly, Catriona, “Reluctant Sibyls: Gender and Intertextuality in the Work of Adelaida Gertsyk and Vera Merkur'eva,” in Sandler (ed.), Rereading Russian Poetry. New Haven, CT, 1999, 129—45
Kelly, Catriona, “Writing an Orthodox Text: Religious Poetry by Russian Women, 1917—1940,” Poetics of the Text, Studies in Slavic Literature and Poetics, vol. 17. (1992), 153–70
Kelly, Catriona, A History of Russian Women's Writing 1820—1992. Oxford, 1994
Ketchian, Sonia, The Poetry of Anna Akhmatova: A Conquest of Time and Space. Munich, 1990
Khaindrova, Lydiia Iulianovna (originally in Georgian, Khaindrava; b. 1910, Odessa, Russia; d. 1986, Krasnodar, USSR; married name Serebrova). Poet
Kheraskova, Elizaveta Vasil'evna (b. Neronova, 1737, d. 1809). Poet. Married neoclassical poet and Freemason Mikhail Kheraskov in 1759. Published a small number of poems in journals such as Poleznoe uveselenie and Aonidy. Mentor to Anna Labzina (see below)
Khodasevich, Vladislav, “Konets Renaty,” in Nekropol’. Paris, 1976 (essay dated 1928)
Khrenkov, D., Ot serdtsa k serdtsu: o zhizni i tvorchestve Ol'gi Berggol'ts, 2nd edn, Leningrad, 1982
Khvoshchinskaia, Nadezhda Dmitrievna (pseudonyms: V. Krestovskii-psevdonim, V. Porechnikov, N. Vozdvizhenskii; b. 1820?, Riazan’ province; d. 1889, St. Petersburg, married name Zaionchkovskaia [m. 1865]). Poet, prose writer, essayist. Began her literary career publishing poetry in the 1840s. Much of her prose satirizes the provinces (e.g. her 1850s trilogy, Provintsiia v starye gody), and many of her works are deeply ironic
Khvoshchinskaia, Sof'ia Dmitrievna (pseudonym Iv. Vesen'ev b. 1828?, Riazan province, d. 1865.) Artist, poet, critic, author. A talented painter and author, she is deservedly known for her fine irony and psychological probing
Khvoshchinskaya, Nadezhda, The Boarding-School Girl, tr. Karen Rosneck. Evanston, IL, 2000
Khvostova, Aleksandra Petrovna (b. 1767, d. 1852). Author of prose, prose poems, and translations. Niece of Elizaveta Kheraskova (see above). Hostess of a salon in the 1800s. Major works include the runaway success Otryvki (St. Petersburg, 1796)
Klimenko-Ratgauz, Tat'iana (b. Ratgauz, 1909, Berlin; d. 1993, Riga; married: 1) Aseev; 2) actor V. V. Klimenko, 1936). Father poet Daniil M. Ratgauz; raised in Kiev, Moscow; emigrated with father to Berlin, 1921; father published two books of poetry, 1922, 1927. To Prague, 1923; degree, College of English; studied dramatic studio of L. S. Il'iashenko; performed in local productions of Gorky, Meierhold; member, Czech Union of Russian Actors, 1927. Published first poems in Studencheskie gody, 1925; from late 1920s, member, Alfred Bem's “Skit poetov,” literary circle “Daliborka”. Joined Russian Dramatic Theater, Riga, 1935—46; with husband Klimenko applied for Soviet citizenship, refused. Poetry published in Soviet Russia since late 1970s; first vol. of collected verse, 1987, incl. memoir of father
Kniazhevich, Lydiia (Lydiia Nikolaevna Ul'shtein; b. 1895, Saratov, Russia; d. 1939, Shanghai). Novelist, playwright, actress
Kniazhnina-Sumarokova, Ekaterina Aleksandrovna (b. 1746, d. 1797). Poet. Daughter of the major neoclassical poet Aleksandr Sumarokov, married to the playwright, poet and translator Iakov Kniazhnin. Hostess of an important salon: undoubtedly the author of works that have not survived
Knorring, Irina Nikolaevna (b. 1906, Elshanka, Samara province; d. 1943, Paris; married poet Iurii Bek-Sofiev, 1928; one son). Aristocratic family, father historian; raised in Khar'kov; writing poetry at age of eight. Emigrated with family, 1920; lived Tuapse, Simferopol, Sevastopol, Bizerte (Tunisia), completed high school education. To Paris, 1925; studied Franco-Russian Institute; active in Paris literary circles. Diagnosed with diabetes, 1927; married Bek-Sofiev, 1928; son, 1929. Published 1st vol., 1931, 2nd, 1939, despite illness; poems written during German occupation published by father Nikolai N. Knorring, 1949. Bek-Sofiev repatriated after war, father in 1955, to Alma-Ata; organized publication of Knorring's poetry in Prostor, 1962, Den’ poezii, 1965, and as separate vol., Novye stikhi, 1967
Kogan, Kogan P., “Iz zhizni i literatury: Intelligentnaia zhenshchina v rasskazakh g-zhi Krandievskoi,” Obrazovanie 2 (1902), 31–8
Kolesnikoff, Nina, “The Generic Structure of Ljudmila Petruševskaja's ‘Pesni vostochnykh slavian,’” Slavic and East European Journal 37:2 (1993), 220–30
Kollman, Nancy Shields Kinship and Politics: the Making of the Muscovite Political System 1345—1547. Stanford, 1987
Kollman, Nancy Shields Major Problems in Early Modern Russian History. New York, 1992
Kollman, Nancy Shields, “The Seclusion of Elite Muscovite Women,” Russian History 10:2 (1983), 170–87
Kollontai, Aleksandra Mikhailovna (b. Domontovich, 1872, St. Petersburg; d. 1952, Moscow; married: 1) cousin V. Kollontai, 1893 [separated 1898, one son]; 2) P. Dybenko, Commissar of Navy, 1918 [separated 1922]). Illegitimate daughter of aristocratic parents; studied economics in Zurich; began writing on women's emancipation, 1905. Joined Mensheviks, 1903; Bolsheviks, 1915; arrested by Provisional Government, 1917. After Revolution, became highest-ranking woman in Lenin's government as Commissar for Social Welfare (1917—18); head of Women's Department of Communist Party (Zhenotdel), 1921—2; dismissed 1922 for membership in Workers’ Opposition. 1922—30, diplomatic service in Norway and Mexico; 1930—45, Soviet ambassador to Sweden. In 1920s turned to fiction; writings after 1927 less interesting
Kolosova, Marianna (Rimma Ivanovna Vinogradova; b. 1903, Altai, Russia; d. 1964, Santiago, Chile; married name Pokrovskaia. Pseudonyms Marianna Kolosova, Elena Insarova, Dzhungar). Poet. For more bibliographical data, see Ledkovsky, Marina, Charlotte Rosenthal, and Mary Zirin (eds.), Dictionary of RussianWomenWriters. Westport, CT, 1994., 310
Koltonovskaia, E. A. “Tvorchestvo, utverzhdaiushchee zhizn’,” Novaia zhizn’, St. Petersburg, 1910
Koltonovskaia, E. A. Kriticheskie etiudy. St. Petersburg, 1912
Koltonovskaia, E. A. Zhenskie siluety. St. Petersburg, 1912
Koltonovskaia, Koltonovskaia E., “Iz zhizni i literatury,” Obrazovanie 9 (1907), 74–88
Kondakov, N., “Rasskazy E. M. Militsynoi,” Sbornik otdeleniia russkogo iazyka i slovesnosti, 84 (1908), part 2, 103–8
Kondratovich, Alla. Poet. Sister of Vera Kondratovich. Went to the USSR in the 1950s
Kondratovich, Vera (married name Sidorova). Poet. Went to the USSR in the 1950s
Koptiaeva, Antonina Dmitrievna (b. 1909, Iuzhnyi, Far East; d. 1991, Moscow; married: 1) manager K. Ya. Zeite [arrested, 1938, died in prison]; 2) writer F. Panferov). From lower middle class (meshchane); Komsomol member, 1926—8; began writing sketches, 1935; member of Union of Soviet Writers, 1944; writer; member of CPSU, 1944; graduated Moscow Literary Institute, 1947; Stalin Prize for Ivan Ivanovich, 1949
Korostovets, Mariia Pavlovna (b. Popova; d. 1980s). Poet. Daughter of a Russian consul in Mongolia and Sinologist P. Popov, wife of a son of the diplomat I. Ia. Korostovets. Lived in Beijing, in 1943 moved to Shanghai. In the 1950s the family went to Australia
Kovalev, V. A. (ed.), Tvorchestvo Marietty Shaginian. Leningrad, 1980
Kozhevnikova, Nadezhda (b. 1949, Moscow). Moscow native, daughter of Soviet writer Vadim Kozhevnikov, and graduate of Moscow's Gorky Institute of Literature. First published fiction in 1967
Kozlova, L. N., Starost’ — molodosti: Anastasiia Ivanovna Tsvetaeva v zhizni. Moscow, 1992
Krüdener, Baroness Juliane-Barbare von (b. von Vietinghoff, 1764, d. 1824). From a Baltic German noble family; married at 14, and toured Europe with her husband, a Russian diplomat. Later became famous as a mystic; for a while, the confidante of Aleksandr I. Major works include Valèrie (Paris, 1803)
Krandievskaia, Anastasiia Romanovna (b. Tarkhova, 1865; d. Stavropol, 1938; married publisher V. Krandievskii in 1880s; three children). Mother of poet Natal'ia Krandievskaia and great-grandmother of prose writer Tat'iana Tolstaia. Educated at Moscow Higher Courses for Women; worked as journalist, 1880s; first published 1896. Produced several collections of didactic short stories: most famous, “Uchenova, V. (ed.), Tol'ko chas. Moscow, 1988,” 1902. Later tried short philosophical pieces and a political novel. Stopped publishing after Revolution
Krandievskaia, Natal'ia Vasil'evna (b. 1888, Moscow; d. 1963, Leningrad; m. Krandievskaia-Tolstaia). Poet, children's writer and memoirist. An accomplished lyric poet many of whose best verses were produced during the war and the Leningrad blockade
Krestovskaia, Mariia Vsevolodovna (b. 1861, St. Petersburg; d. 1910, Marioki, Finland; married E. A. Kartavtsev, 1891). Daughter of writer V. Krestovskii; parents divorced. Became actress at 17; had illegitimate son at 19; first published, 1885. Gave charitable aid to higher education for women; established health center for writers on estate at Marioki. Stopped publishing fiction 1901, but continued writing diary; contracted cancer
Krichevskaia, Liubov’ Iakovlevna (c. 1800—after 1841). Khar'kov-based author of poetry, fiction, plays. After her father's death in the 1810s, became responsible for the care of her whole family (her career as a writer probably had economic promptings). Never married, owing to the absence of a dowry. Major works include Moi svobodnye minuty (Khar'kov, 1817), Dve povesti: Korinna i Emma (Moscow, 1827)
Kriukova, Elena, (b. 1956, Gorky). Poet, graduated from Moscow Conservatory as well as Literary Institute; began publishing in 1984
Kriukova, Ol'ga Petrovna (b. 1815/17, Simbirsk province; d. 1885, Simbirsk). Of uncertain origin, apparently an orphan raised by a poor woman landowner. Published lyric verse and narrative poems in early 1830s and after 1859 (primarily in Razvlechenie)
Kruk, Nora (b. 1920, Harbin). Lived in Harbin, Shanghai, and Hong Kong, then settled in Sydney. Writes poetry in Russian and English
Kruzenshtern-Peterets, Iu., “Churaevskii pitomnik (O dal'nevostochnykh poetakh),” Vozrozhdenie 204 (1968), 45–70
Kruzenshtern-Peterets, Iustina Vladimirovna (b. 1903, Russia; d. 1983, San Francisco; married names: Stepanova; Peterets). Journalist, prose writer, poet. Pseudonyms Snorre, Sibilla Ven, T. Stern, Merry Devil, Mary Kruzenshtern. A descendant of the famous explorer I. F. Kruzenshtern, she grew up in Harbin where her father, an officer, served in the Zaamurskii District Border Guard at the Chinese Eastern Railway. In the 1920s, Kruzenshtern became a journalist and writer in Harbin and continued her career in the second half of the 1930s and 1940s in Shanghai. Together with her second husband, Harbin poet Nikolai Peterets, she took an active part in Russian literary life in Shanghai. In the early 1950s, she went first to Brazil and then to the USA where she worked for the “Voice of America” and Russian èmigrè newspapers
Kruzenshtern-Peterets, Iustina VladimirovnaWritings: Stikhi. Shanghai, 1946; Antigona. Shanghai. 1948; Ulybka Psishi. Toronto, 1969; “U kazhdogo cheloveka est’ svoia rodina. Vospominaniia,” Rossiiane v Azii 1 (1994), 17—132; “Vospominaniia,” Rossiiane v Azii 4 (1997), 124—209; 5 (1998), 25—83; 6 (1999), 29—104; and 7 (2000), 91–149
Krylova, EllaWritings: Poems in Znamia 1 (1997), 80—5; Druzhba narodov (Peoples' Friendship) 9 (1997), 3—6; Druzhba narodov (Peoples' Friendship) 4 (1996), 3–10
Kul'man, Elisaveta Borisovna (b. 1808, St. Petersburg; d. 1825, St. Petersburg). Daughter of officer of German descent; eighth of nine children; father died soon after her birth; grew up with mother in poverty in St. Petersburg. Prodigious linguistic talents recognized and encouraged by tutor Karl Grossgeinrikh, who found her other teachers; poverty alleviated by small court pension awarded 1821; died at 17 of consumption. Manuscripts edited and published in Russia and abroad by former tutor
Kuprianova, Nina (comp.), Always a Woman: Stories by Soviet Women Writers. Moscow, 1987
Kuz'mina-Karavaeva (Skobtsova), Elizaveta (b. Pilenko, 1891, Riga; d. 1945, Ravensbruck, Germany; also Mat’ Mariia; pseudonym Iurii Danilov; married 1) D. V. Kuz'min-Karavaev, 1910—16; 2) D. E. Skobtsov-Kondrat'ev, 1918—27; two daughters, one son). Raised on family estate, Black Sea; on father's death, family moved to St. Petersburg, 1906; studied philosophy, Bestuzhev School. Married Kuz'min-Karavaev, Duma member, leader Poets’ Guild, 1910; Symbolist circles, friendship with Aleksandr Blok; published first book of verse, 1912. Daughter Gaiana, 1913; divorced, 1916. Studied St. Petersburg Theological Academy, as woman, in absentia; proclaimed religious vocation in collection Ruf’, 1916. Arrested during post-revolutionary period; married Cossack Skobtsov, 1919; emigrated through Constantinople; son Iurii Skobtsov, 1920. To Belgrade; second daughter, Anastasia, 1922. In Paris, 1923; published novel about revolutionary period, articles on politics as Iurii Danilov, 1924—7. Daughter Anastasia died, separation from husband, began active religious vocation, 1926; published under married name saints’ lives, books on religious thinkers, numerous articles on theology, ethics; from 1930, traveling representative of RSKhD among èmigrè communities. Took monastic vows, name Mat’ Mariia, 1932; cared for mentally ill, organized women's shelters, sanatorium for tubercular patients; established philanthropical society “Pravoslavnoe delo,” members Nikolai Berdiaev, Sergei Bulgakov; participant literary circle “Krug”, mid—1930s. Daughter Gaiana returned to Soviet Union, died, 1935. Arrested by Nazis for harboring Jews, 1943; sent to Ravensbruck, died in gas chamber. Vol. of prison documents, writings from 1930s, published posthumously, 1947. Novel based on life by Elena Mikulina, Mat’ Mariia (Moscow, 1983; 2nd expanded edn 1988)
Kuznetsova, Galina Nikolaevna (b. 1900, Kiev; d. 1976, Munich; married White Army officer D. M. Petrov). Raised in Kiev; married after school graduation, 1918. Emigrated with husband through Constantinople, 1920; to Czechoslovakia, 1921. Studied French Institute, Prague; published first poem in Prague journal, 1922. In Paris, 1924; joined household of Ivan and Vera Bunin, 1927, for 15 years, Paris and Grasse; diary of experience later published as Grasskii dnevnik (first in Novyi zhurnal (New Review) 74, 1963). First book a collection of stories, second a novel, third a collection of verse, 1930s. To Germany with opera singer Margarita A. Stepun, 1945, then to US, 1949; worked at Russian section of UN, New York, from 1955; American citizenship, 1956. Worked European section of UN, Geneva, 1959—63; retired in Munich
L'vova, Kseniia
L'vova, Nadezhda Grigor'evna (b. Poltoratskaia, 1891, Podol'sk; d. 1913, Moscow). Poet, translator, critic. Influenced by both Symbolists and Futurists
Labzina, Anna Evdokimovna (b. Iakovleva, 1758; d. 1828). Memoirist. Labzina's autobiography, written in 1810, records her childhood in a minor gentry family in Siberia, her unhappy first marriage to the hypocritical Aleksandr Karamyshev, and contact with the circle of Kheraskova (see above). Her 2nd marriage to the religious philosopher Aleksandr Labzin took her into the heart of Russian Masonic circles, where her work was acknowledged by the gift of a pair of white gloves, symbolic attribute of a virtuous wife
Lahusen, Thomas, “Leaving Paradise and Perestroika: ‘A Week Like Any Other and Memorial Day by Natal'ia Baranskaya; in Goscilo (ed.), Fruits of Her Plume, 205—24
Lakshin, V., “Ol'ga Berggol'ts,” in Otkrytaia dver’. Moscow, 1989, 332–61
Lanskaia-Villamova, Elizaveta Ivanovna (b. Villamova, 1764; d. 1847). Poet. Wife of Privy Councillor and Senator S. S. Lanskoi; daughter of a German poet and inspector of Petropavlovsk School; sister of the State Secretary Grigorii Ivanovich Villamov (1773—1842), tutor of Grand Duchess Aleksandra, daughter of Paul I. Her “Poslanie Derzhavinu” appears in vol. III of his Sochineniia (Works), ed. Grot, 516—17. A volume in French, Mèlanges littèraires, dedièsá l'indulgence, par m-me de Lanskoy-Willamow, appeared in St. Petersburg in 1830
Larsen, Susan, “Girl Talk: Lydia Charskaia and Her Readers,” in Laura Engelstein and Stephanie Sandler (eds.), Self and Story in Russian History. Ithaca, NY, 2000, 141—167
Latynina, Alla. Literary critic; graduated from Dept. of Philology, Moscow University. Received postgraduate degree from Faculty of Philosophy also at MGU. Writes about contemporary literary developments; chaired the first Russian Booker Prize jury in 1992
Latynina, Iuliia (b. 1966). Writer of prose fiction and essays. Journalist. Daughter of Alla Latynina
Ledkovsky, Marina, Charlotte Rosenthal, and Mary Zirin (eds.), Dictionary of Russian Women Writers. Westport, CT, 1994
Lesnaia, Irina (Irina Igorevna Lesevitskaia; b. 1913, Khailar, China; d. 1999, Paraguay). Poet
Letkova, Ekaterina Pavlovna (b. 1856, St. Petersburg; d. 1937, Leningrad; married architect N. V. Sultanov, 1884; one son). Daughter of military man and female landowner. Studied at Moscow Pedagogical Courses and Higher Courses for Women. First contributed to journals as a student. 1870s: associated with populists; involved with Nikolai Mikhailovskii, theorist of Russian populist movement. 1889—1918: member of Committee for Higher Courses for Women and representative of courses’ library committee. After Revolution, worked for World Literature Press and State Publishing House; from 1921, member of Literary Fund Committee; on board of directors of House of Writers. Wrote more than 60 works of fiction and memoir of feminist Anna Filosofova; after Revolution, published memoirs of writers she had known
Levin, Eve Sex and Society in the World of the Orthodox Slavs, 900—1700. Ithaca, NY, 1989
Levin, Eve, “Women and Property in Medieval Novgorod,” Russian History 10:2 (1983), 154–69
Levy, Sandra, “Women and the Control of Property in Sixteenth-Century Muscovy,” Russian History 10:2 (1983), 201–12
Likhachev, D. S. “The Type and Character of the Byzantine Influence on Old Russian Literature,” Oxford Slavonic Papers 12—13, (1965—67), 14–32
Likhachev, D. S. Poetika drevnerusskoi literatury. Leningrad, 1971
Likhachev, D. S. Velikii put’: stanovlenie russkoi literatury IX—XVII vekov. Moscow, 1987
Likhachev, D. S., Chelovek v literature Drevnei Rusi. Moscow, 1958
Liljeström, Marianne, Eila Mäntysaari, and Arja Rosenholm (eds.), Gender Restructuring in Russian Studies. Slavic Tamperensia 2 (Tampere, 1993)
Lisitsyna, Mariia Alekseevna (b. 1810?, d. 1842?). Poet, novelist. Probably the daughter of the well-known Moscow actor Aleksei Lisitsyn. Friend of the Teplova sisters (see below). Major works include Emilii Likhtenberg (Moscow, 1826) and Stikhi i proza Marii Lisitsynoi (Moscow, 1829)
Lisnianskaia, Inna L'vovna (b. Baku, 1928). Poet, critic, lives in Moscow. Participant in Metropol affair
Literaturnyi kruzhok “Akhme” (ed.), Lestnitsa v oblaka. Harbin, 1929
Lokhvitskaia, Mirra (Mariia) (b. 1869/70, d. 1905). Poet and dramatist
Lunacharskii, A., “Zhurnal zametki,” Obrazovanie 3 (1905)
M⊘ller, Peter Ulf, Postlude to ‘The Kreutzer Sonata’: Tolstoj and the Debate on Sexual Morality in Russian Literature in the 1890s. Leiden/New York, 1988
Magnitskaia, Aleksandra Leont'evna? (b. 1784, d. 1846), poet and translator, and Magnitskaia, Natal'ia Leont'evna?, poet and translator: active 1790s. The sisters of the brilliant Moscow intellectual and poet Mikhail Leont'evich Magnitskii, who also published in PPPV and Aonidy
Makarov, A., “Vera Inber,” in Inber, Sobranie sochinenii (Collected works), vol. I. Moscow, 1965, 5–42
Makarova, Elena (b. 1951, Baku). Author of prose fiction and essays. Daughter of poet Inna Lisnianskaia. Studied at Surikov Institute of Art and the Gorky Institute of World Literature in Moscow. Art therapist and teacher of art to handicapped children. Emigrated with her family to Israel in 1990
Makin, Michael, Marina Tsvetaeva: Poetics of Appropriation. Oxford, 1993
Makovskii, Sergei, “Cherubina de Gabriak,” in Portrety sovremennikov. New York, 1955
Maksimov, Maksimov, “Liubov’ Dmitrievna,” ed. K. M. Azadovskii and A. V. Lavrov. Novoe literaturnoe obozrenie (New Literary Review) 35 (1999), 257–80
Mandel'stam, Nadezhda Iakovlevna (b. 1899, Saratov; d. 1980, Moscow). Artist, memoirist, cultural critic. Trained as an artist. Met the poet Osip Mandel'stam in 1919. Preserved works and memory of Mandel'stam after he perished in 1938 in a labor camp. After death of her husband completed a doctorate in linguistics. Began writing memoirs of the Stalin years. In her writings of major literary figures became one in her own right
Manuilov, V., preface in Krandievskaia, Vechernii svet. Leningrad, 1972
Mar, Anna (b. Anna Iakovlevna Brovar, 1887, St. Petersburg; d. 1917, Moscow; married Lenshin, 1903, but marriage quickly broke up). Daughter of artist Ia. Brovar; left home for Khar'kov, aged 15, attracted to Catholicism. Helped to publish by V. Briusov. Participated in women's movement; answered readers’ letters to Journal for Women under pseudonym “Princess Daydream.” Poisoned self because of unhappy love affair, reputedly with the writer Vlasii Doroshevich
Marinina, Aleksandra (pseudonym of Marina Anatol'evna Alekseeva, b. 1957, Leningrad). One of most popular writers of detective fiction in post-Soviet Russia. Moved to Moscow in 1971 where she studied jurisprudence at Moscow State University. The author of more than 30 scholarly publications, she worked for the Ministry of Internal Affairs until retiring in 1998. Selected the “Writer of the Year” at the 1998 Moscow International Book Fair. Marinina's website <http://www.marinina.ru> lists numerous articles about her that have appeared in the Russian press as well as biographical and publication information
Markov, V., Russian Futurism: A History. Berkeley, 1968
Markov, Vladimir and Merrill Sparks (eds.), Modern Russian Poetry: An Anthology with Verse Translations. Indianapolis, IN, 1967
Marsh, R. J. “Anastasiia Verbitskaia Reconsidered,” in Marsh, Rosalind (ed.), Gender and Russian Literature. New Perspectives. Cambridge, 1996., 184–205
Marsh, R. J. “Sex, Religion and Censorship in Anna Mar's Zhenshchina na kreste,” in Peter Barta (ed.), Gender and Sexuality in Russian Civilisation. Newark, NJ, 2001
Marsh, R. J., “The Birth, Death and Rebirth of Feminist Writing in Russia,” in Helena Forsås-Scott (ed.), Textual Liberation: European Feminist Writing in the Twentieth Century. London, 1991, 130—63
Marsh, Rosalind (ed.), Gender and Russian Literature. New Perspectives. Cambridge, 1996
Marsh, Rosalind (ed.), Women and Russian Culture: Projections and Self-Perceptions. New York, 1998. (Studies in Slavic Literature, Culture, and Society, 2)
Mat’ Mariia, see Kuzmina-Karavaeva
Matich, Olga “Dialectics of Cultural Return: Zinaida Gippius’ Personal Myth,” in Boris Gasparov, Robert P. Hughes, and Irina Paperno (eds.), Cultural Mythologies of Russian Modernism: From the Golden Age to the Silver Age. Berkeley, CA, 1992, 52—72
Matich, Olga “Gender Trouble in the Amazonian Kingdom: Turn-of-the-Century Representations of Women in Russia,” in John E. Bowlt and Matthew Drutt (eds.), Amazons of the Avante-Garde. New York, 2000, 75—93
Matich, Olga, Paradox in the Religious Poetry of Zinaida Gippius. Munich, 1972
McLaughlin, Sigrid “An Interview with Viktoria Tokareva,” Canadian Woman Studies 10:4 (Winter 1989), 76
McLaughlin, Sigrid (ed. and tr.), The Image of Women in Contemporary Soviet Fiction: Selected Short Stories from the USSR. New York, 1989
McLaughlin, Sigrid, “Contemporary Soviet Women Writers,” Canadian Woman Studies 10: 4 (Winter 1989), 77—80
McReynolds, Louise “Reading the Russian Romance: What Did the Keys to Happiness Unlock?” Journal of Popular Culture 31:4 (1998), 95–108
McReynolds, Louise, “Female Journalists in Prerevolutionary Russia,” Journalism History 4 (1987), 104–10
Meehan-Water, Brenda Holy Women of Russia: The Lives of Five Orthodox Women Offer Spiritual Guidance for Today. San Francisco, 1993
Meehan-Water, Brenda, “The Authority of Holiness: Women Ascetics and Spiritual Elders in Nineteenth-Century Russia,” in Geoffrey Hosking (ed.), Church, Nation and State. London, 1991, 38—51
Mendeleeva-Blok, Liubov’ (b. 1881, d. 1939). Stage actress, memoirist, and author of articles on the ballet
Merkur'eva, Vera Aleksandrovna (b. 1876, Vladikavkaz; d. 1943, Tashkent). Poet, translator. Published only 15 poems during her lifetime. Made her living exclusively from translation. “Discovered” only in the 1980s
Mikhailovskii, Mikhailovskii N., “Literatura i zhizn’,” Russkoe bogatstvo (RussianWealth) 8 (1899), 161–82
Militsyna, Elizaveta Mitrofanovna (b. 1869, Ostrogozhsk, Voronezh province; d. 1930, Voronezh; married: 1) steward Kargin, 1889; 2) supportive agronomist N. A. Militsyn). Helped to publish 1896 by Korolenko and Gorky. Persecuted by police; third vol. of collected works censored, 1913. Worked as nurse in World War I; joined Russian Communist Party, 1920; published little fiction after Revolution
Miller, Larisa (b. 1940, Moscow). Writer of poetry and prose. Graduate of the Foreign Language Institute
Miller, LarisaWritings: Shagi i vzdokhi: Chetyre knigi stikhov. Vienna, 1982; U smerti v gostiakh. Vienna, 1982; Metamorphosen. Vienna, 1988; Das Buch Sabeth. Vienna, 1988; Literary essays: “O roli detskogo vospominaniia v psikhologii khudozhestvennogo tvorchestva: Na primere prozy Mariny Tsvetaevoi i dvukh otryvkov iz romana F. M. Dostoevskogo Brat'ia Karamazovy,” Wiener Slawistischer Almanach 10 (1982), 325—49; “Khlebnikov: Predel i bespredel'naia muzyka slova,” Sintaksis 11 (1983), 101—56; “Znachenie i rol’ vospominaniia v khudozhestvennoi praktike. Freid_Dostoevskii_Geine,” Wiener Slawistischer Almanach 16 (1985), 37–80
Mirsky, D. S., “O sovremennom sostoianii russkoi literatury,” Novyi zhurnal (New Review) 131 (1978); repr. D. S. Mirsky, Uncollected Writings on Russian Literature, ed. G. S. Smith. Berkeley, CA, 1989
Mirtov, O. “A. Krandievskaia. Rasskazy,” Obrazovanie 7 (1905)
Mirtov, O., “E. Militsyna. Rasskazy,” Obrazovanie 3 (1905)
Mitropol’ skii, A. I. (ed.), Lira. Harbin, 1945
Mnatsakanova (occasional pen name Netzkowa) Elizaveta Arkad'evna (b. 1922, Baku). Poet, graphic artist, essayist, and musicologist. Lives in Vienna
Mokrinskaia, Nina Moia zhizn’. Vospominaniia. Kniga vtoraia. New York, 1995
Mokrinskaia, Nina, Moia zhizn’ (detstvo v Sibiri, iunost’ v Kharbine — 1914—1932 gody). New York, 1991
Morits, Iunna Petrovna (b. 1937, Kiev). Studied at Gorky Literary Institute and in Riga. Poet, essayist, translator, children's writer. Lives in Moscow
Morozova, Galina Vsevolodovna (b. 1915, Omsk, married name, Loginova). Novelist
Morozova, Ol'ga Aleksandrovna (b. Kolesova, 1877, Khar'kov, Ukraine; d. 1968, San Francisco). Novelist. Pseudonym M. Aleksandrov. Graduate of Khar'kov Institute, she established schools for peasant children in Russia; during World War I was in charge of the office responsible for procuring meat from Asia for the Russian army, and during the Civil War organized a hospital. She emigrated to western China, then moved to Tianjin and later Shanghai. In 1951 she and her daughter came to the USA via a refugee camp on Tubabao, Philippines. For more bibliographical data see M. Ledkovsky et al. (eds), Ledkovsky, Marina, Charlotte Rosenthal, and Mary Zirin (eds.), Dictionary of RussianWomenWriters. Westport, CT, 1994., 443—4
Mortimer, Peter and S. J. Litherland (eds.), The Poetry of Perestroika. Newcastle upon Tyne, 1991
Moskvina, Elisaveta Osipovna (married name Mukhina) and Mariia Osipovna (active 1800s): poets, authors of Aoniia (Moscow, 1802)
Murav'ev V., “Zhenskaia dusha v poezii. Muzy kharbinskogo Parnassa,” Rubezh 40:297 (1933), 16–17
Murzina, Aleksandra (active 1790s): poet, author of Raspuskaiushchaiasia roza (Moscow, 1798)
Nabatnikova, Tat'iana (b. 1948, Altai region). Writer of prose fiction. Grew up in the country, graduated from the Novosibirsk Electrochemical Institute in 1971, attended the Gorky Institute of Literature, 1975—81. Began publishing fiction (several prize-winning collections) while living in Cheliabinsk
Nagrodskaia, Evdokiia Apollonovna (b. 1866, St. Petersburg; d. 1930, Paris; married high official V. Nagrodskii). Maternal grandparents were actors at Aleksandrinskii Theater; daughter of writer Avdot'ia Panaeva and journalist Apollon Golovachev. Possibly worked in theater, 1880s. Her first novel The Wrath of Dionysus (1910), went through 10 editions by 1916. After Revolution, emigrated to Paris; published historical novels influenced by her work in Masonic movement
Nagrodskaya, E., The Wrath of Dionysus, tr. Louise McReynolds. Bloomington, IN, 1997
Naiman, A., Rasskazy ob Anne Akhmatovoi. Moscow, 1989; in English as Remembering Anna Akhmatova. London, 1991
Narbikova, Valeriia (b. 1958, Moscow). Writer of prose fiction and artist. First published fiction in 1989, winning the prize for best publication of the year in the journal Iunost’
Nedel'skaia, Elena Nikolaevna (b. 1912, Iaroslavl’; d. 1980, Sydney). Poet. Left Harbin in the 1950s and lived in Australia
Neelova, Natal'ia Alekseevna (married name Makarova). Pioneer prose writer. Probably the sister of the minor writer Pavel Neelov. Author of Leinard i Termiliia, ili zloschastnaia sud'ba dvukh liubovnikov. St. Petersburg, 1784
Nekrasova, Kseniia Aleksandrovna (b. 1912, Urals; d. 1956, Moscow). Poet. Little known in her early years. Lacked a conventional education. Lived during the war years in Tashkent where she was discovered by Akhmatova. Published only one work during her lifetime
Nepomnyashchy, Catharine Theimer “The Seduction of the Story: Flight and ‘Fall’ in Tolstaya's Heavenly Flame,” in Karen L. Ryan and Barry P. Scherr (eds.), Twentieth-Century Russian Literature: Selected Papers from the Fifth World Congress of Central and East European Studies, Warsaw, 1995. New York, 2000, 193—205
Nepomnyashchy, Catharine Theimer, “Markets, Mirrors, and Mayhem: Aleksandra Marinina and the Rise of the New Russian Detektiv,” in Adele Barker (ed.), Consuming Russia: Popular Culture, Sex, and Society since Gorbachev, Durham, NC, 1999, 161—91
Nikol'skaia, T. L. “Novaia Eva,” Iskusstvo Leningrada 8 (1991)
Nikol'skaia, T. L., “Tema misticheskogo sektanstva v russkoi poezii 20-kh godov XX veka,” Trudy po russkoi i slavianskoi filologii Tartuskogo universiteta. Literaturovedenie 883 (1990)
Nikolaev, P. A. (ed.), Biograficheskii slovar’. 4 vols. Moscow, 1989—99
Nikolaev, P. A. (ed.), Russkie pisateli 1800—1917. Biograficheskii slovar’ vols. I—IV (of a projected five). Moscow, 1989—99
Nikolaeva, Galina Evgen'evna, (b. 1911, v. Usmanka, West-Siberian rgn; d. 1963, Moscow; married M. Sagalovich, 1930). From rural intelligentsia; graduated from Gorky Medical Institute, 1935; doctor, worked in hospital during war; transported wounded from Stalingrad; began writing poetry, 1944; first published, 1945; poet, writer; member Union of Soviet Writers; Stalin Prize for Zhatva, 1951
Nikolaeva, M. N., “Prevysprennye geroini,” Russkoe bogatstvo (RussianWealth) 12 (1891)
Nikolaeva, Olesia (Ol'ga) Aleksandrovna (b. 1955, Moscow). Poet, lives in Moscow
Nikolskaia, Nikolskaia, “The Contemporary Woman in Early Twentieth-Century Russian Literature,” Irish Slavonic Studies 8 (1987), 107–13
Nikonova, Ry (Reia; Anna Aleksandrovna Tarshis; b. 1942, Eisk). Poet, artist, theorist
Ninov, Ninov, “Real'nost’ geroia,” Zvezda 7 (1967), 192–202
Norton, Barbara T. and Jehanne Gheith, (eds), An Improper Profession: Women, Gender, and Journalism in Late Imperial Russia. Durham, NC, 2001
Odoevtseva, Irina Vladimirovna (pseudonym Zinaida Shekarazina; b. Iraida Gustavovna Geinike, 1901, Riga; d. 1990, Leningrad; married: 1) lawyer Popov-Odoevtsev; 2) poet Georgii Ivanov, 1921; 3) novelist Iakov Gorbov, 1978). Father St. Petersburg lawyer. Protègèe Nikolai Gumilev, member “Poets’ Guild”; noted for ballads; first book vol. of poetry, 1922. Emigrated with Ivanov to Berlin, 1923, then Paris; wrote popular short fiction, several novels; Biarritz during German occupation, returned to Paris; wrote three plays in French and new poetry, early 1950s. After Ivanov's death, 1958, correspondent Russkaia mysl'(Russian Thought)', two vols. of memoirs about prerevolutionary St. Petersburg (1919—22) and èmigrè Paris (1920s—70s). Moved to Leningrad, 1987
Oskotskii, V., “Kak khoroshi, kak svezhi byli rozy …,” Druzhba narodov (Peoples' Friendship) 4 (1977), 272–5
Ovanesian, E., “Tvortsy raspada,” Molodaia gvardiia (The Young Guard) (April 3, 1992), 249—62
Ovsianiko-Kulikovskii, D. N., “Predislovie,” in Olga Shapir, Sobranie sochinenii (Collected works), vol. I. St. Petersburg, 1910
Pachmuss, Temira (ed. and tr.), Women Writers in Russian Modernism. Urbana, IL, 1978
Pachmuss, Temira Russian Literature in the Baltic between the World Wars. Columbus, OH, 1988
Pachmuss, Temira Women Writers in Russian Modernism: An Anthology. Urbana, IL, 1978
Pachmuss, Temira, “Five Women Poets in Early Russian Emigre Literature,” in Zapiski russkoi akademicheskoi gruppy v S. Sh. A. New York, 1967, 187–200
Pachmuss, Temira, (ed.) A Russian Cultural Revival: A Critical Anthology of Emigrè Literature Before 1939. Knoxville, TN, 1981
Pachmuss, Temira, Zinaida Hippius: An Intellectual Profile. Carbondale, IL, 1971
Palei, Marina (b. Spivak, 1955, Leningrad). Writer of prose fiction. Professional training in medicine. Abandoned medicine. Graduated with honors from Gorky Literary Institute, 1991. One of the most talented new writers, Palei's works evoke both nostalgia and the absurd in her renderings of the Soviet everyday
Palei, Palei, “Tvoia nemyslimaia chistota,” Literaturnoe obozrenie (Literary Review) 6 (1987), 1–64
Panaeva, Avdot'ia Iakovlevna (pseudonym N. Stanitskii; b. Brianskaia; 1819/20, d. 1893. name [2nd marriage] Golovacheva). Writer, memoirist, and central figure in the circle around the journal The Contemporary which her husband Ivan Panaev co-edited with the poet and prose writer Nikolai Nekrasov. Daughter (2nd marriage) became an author (Evdokiia Nagrodskaia). Although she is today mainly known for her memoirs, Panaeva was also an accomplished author of fiction
Panova, Vera Fedorovna (b. 1905, Rostov-on-Don; d. 1973, St. Petersburg; married: 1) journalist A. V. Starosel'skii; 2) journalist B. Vakhtin (arrested, 1936, died in camp); 3) writer D. Ya. Dar). From lower middle class (meshchane); left gymnasium during 2nd year, self-educated; journalist, 1920s—30s; started writing late 1930s; member of Union of Soviet Writers, 1946; writer, playwright, screenwriter; Stalin Prizes for Sputniki, 1947; Kruzhilikha, 1948; Iasnyi bereg, 1950
Parkau Aleksandra Petrovna (b. 1889, Novocherkassk; d. 1954, USSR; married Nilus). Poet, satirist. The earliest woman poet in Harbin, she settled there during World War I with her husband, Colonel E. Kh. Nilus, a military lawyer and historian. In the 1920s, Parkau's poetry often appeared in Harbin periodicals, and she held a literary salon. In 1933 in Shanghai she continued to write poetry and participate in literary circles; in the late 1940s, she followed her son and his family to the USSR
Parnok, Sofiia Iakovlevna (pseudonym Andrei Polianin; b. Parnokh, 1885, Taganrog; d. 1933, Karinskoe). Poet, critic, opera librettist, translator
Pavlova, Karolina Karlovna (b. Jaenisch/Ianish, 1807, Moscow; d. 1893, Dresden). Of German, French, English and Russian extraction. Daughter of physics professor; well-educated at home; moved in Moscow literary circles in 1820s; failed romance with Adam Mickiewicz in late 1820s profoundly influenced life and later poetry; married writer Nikolai Pavlov in 1837, by whom she had one son; active as translator in 1820s and 1830s; wrote original Russian poetry from late 1830s until mid-1860s; salon hostess c. 1839—52; endured political and marital troubles from late 1840s onward; separated from husband, went to Dorpat in 1853, and settled in Dresden 1858. Little is known of her life, but from this point on apparently wrote little Russian poetry, although continued literary activities until death
Pereleshin Valerii, “Dva polustanka. Vospominaniia svidetelia i uchastnika literaturnoi zhizni Kharbina i Shangkhia,” published under the title Russian Poetry and Literary Life in Harbin and Shanghai 19301950. The Memoirs of Valerij Perelesin. Amsterdam, 1987
Pereleshin, V. (ed.), Izluchiny. Harbin, 1935
Perova, Natasha (ed.), Women's View, Glas 3 (1992)
Perova, Natasha A Will and a Way, Glas 13 (1996)
Peterson, Nadya L. “Games Women Play,” in Goscilo (ed.), Fruits of Her Plume, 165—83
Peterson, Nadya L., Subversive Imaginations: Fantastic Prose and the End of Soviet Literature, 1970—1990s. Boulder, CO, 1997 (ch. 10 on Petrushevskaia, Sadur, Tolstaia, Narbikova)
Petrovskaia, Nina (b. 1884, d. 1928). Writer of short stories, feuilletons, and reviews
Petrovskaia, Ol'ga. Poet