CHAPTER XXI - VOYAGES OF CAPTAIN WICKHAM, FITZROY, AND STOKES, IN THE BEAGLE, ROUND THE AUSTRALIAN COASTS, FROM 1837 TO 1843  pp. 332-349

VOYAGES OF CAPTAIN WICKHAM, FITZROY, AND STOKES, IN THE BEAGLE, ROUND THE AUSTRALIAN COASTS, FROM 1837 TO 1843

By William Howitt

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The Beagle was one of the most famous little ships that ever was employed in the service of science and discovery. In this service, she was employed from the year 1826 to 1843—seventeen years. She was, says Captain Lort Stokes, one of those 10-gun brigs called coffins, but turned out one of the most remarkable vessels in the annals of maritime research. She commenced her famous career by being the first rigged man-of-war that ever passed under London Bridge, which she did to salute at the coronation of Greorge IV. In that same year, she was engaged to attend Captain Philip Parker King in a voyage of scientific inquiry round the world. The Beagle, in her first voyage, left Plymouth on the 22nd of May, 1826, and according to the instructions from the Board of Admiralty, after having, in company with the Adventure, spent the intervening time on the coasts of South America, returned to England in October, 1830. During this voyage, she was commanded by Captain Pringle Stokes, till August, 1828, when in a fit of insanity, brought on by severe exertion in a cruise on the coast of Patagonia, he destroyed himself, at Port Famine, in Magellan's Straits. On arriving at Rio Janeiro, in October of that year, Captain Robert Fitzroy took the command. On arrival in England in October, 1830, the Adventure was paid off and put out of commission; and the Beagle, commanded by Captain Fitzroy, made her second voyage alone.

The History of Discovery in Australia, Tasmania, and New Zealand Volume 2

William Howitt

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Book DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511996887