CHAPTER VI - MATHEMATICAL THEORY OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC CURRENTS  pp. 329-337

MATHEMATICAL THEORY OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC CURRENTS

By James Clerk Maxwell

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On Systems of Linear Conductors

273.] Any conductor may be treated as a linear conductor if it is arranged so that the current must always pass in the same manner between two portions of its surface which are called its electrodes. For instance, a mass of metal of any form the surface of which is entirely covered with insulating material except at two places, at which the exposed surface of the conductor is in metallic contact with electrodes formed of a perfectly conducting material, may be treated as a linear conductor. For if the current be made to enter at one of these electrodes and escape at the other the lines of flow will be determinate, and the relation between electromotive force, current and resistance will be expressed by Ohm's Law, for the current in every part of the mass will be a linear function of E. But if there be more possible electrodes than two, the conductor may have more than one independent current through it, and these may not be conjugate to each other. See Art. 282.

Ohm's Law

274.] Let E be the electromotive force in a linear conductor from the electrode A1 to the electrode A2.

A Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism Volume 2

James Clerk Maxwell

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Book DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511709340